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Cebu House Roof Construction


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thebob

The Laguna White on my roof looks white to me.

 

It does from far away, but when you are painting it you notice it is a kind of battleship grey.

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But I am 100% sure it is still cooler than a dark colored truck! 

Exhaust fans are great, but color makes a HUGE difference--White repels and dark attracts. Touch a dark colored car in the sun and touch a white one. My builder has been in the business for many year

Well as somebody from Florida I know VEry well that light colored or white roofs make the house exponetially cooler. Of course it is also a scientific fact that white repels heat while dark attractsab

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cebubird

It does from far away, but when you are painting it you notice it is a kind of battleship grey.

 

Watched the guys painting mine up close and it looked VERY white to me

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thebob

Interesting. I was actually asked what the paint was as I painted mine, and then I was asked what a "Laguna" was. I replied "Some kind of grey thing!".

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Knowdafish

Interesting. I was actually asked what the paint was as I painted mine, and then I was asked what a "Laguna" was. I replied "Some kind of grey thing!".

Laguna means lagoon in Spanish, or can be roughly translated to lake. Gris is Spanish for grey. 

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tomaw

 

Personally, if I was have another house built in the Philippines, I would go for a BIPV Roof.

 

BIPV - Building Integrated Photo Voltaic

 

Instead of bolting PV Solar Panels to an existing Roof (that might need strengthening, to take the extra weight). why not employ a roofing structure that is designed for PV use?

 

There are several types but basically for normal roof (as opposed to Terrace and Car Port shades), it can be BIPV Standing seam, or BIPV 'Tiles'.

 

englert-sunnet-solar-standing-seam-roof-

 

BIPV_module_solar_roof_tile_55W.jpg

 

bipv1.jpg

 

POWERHOUSE-Solar-Shingle_12.091.jpg

PV 'Shingles'?

 

 

492118570_253.jpg

 

1263861226170_hz_myalibaba_web11_15867.j

 

Whilst looking for images of such BIPV Roofing, found this one that give Solar Electric and Solar Hot Water:-

 

Snack on the Sun with a Solar Sandwich

By archives on Sep. 8, 2011 | Topics: Solar | Comments (10)

Solar-Sandwich-by-Englert-568x375.jpg

New Jersey-based Englert, a company that specializes in metal roofing and gutter systems, recently earned a citation from Architect Magazine for their incredible Solar Sandwichroof system. On the surface, it looks like any other standing-seam metal roof with columns of thin-film photovoltaic solar. Yet below that, to capture the warmth generated from hot metal roofing, there’s a grid of pex-filled purlins with a water and glycol solution for a solar thermal system.

Solar-Sandwich-w-Glycol-568x375.jpg

The system connects with conventional heat transfer and distribution systems for residential and commercial hot water systems, radiant floor heating systems, and swimming pool heaters, according to Englert.

Dawn Solar Systems makes the solar thermal component, while the thin-film PV aspect is similar to what’s provided in the EnergyPeak system with Uni-Solar PV laminates. In this case, it’s the SunNet BIPV system, which uses an Englert metal roof.

Solar-Sandwich-Roof-Installation-568x334

[+] Learn more about the Solar Sandwich from Englert.

http://www.englertinc.com/solar-energy-systems/solar-thermal-energy-systems.html

....... This looks great! But is it available in Cebu? Also can you get the skilled labor to install it in Cebu?
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....... This looks great! But is it available in Cebu? Also can you get the skilled labor to install it in Cebu?

 

No. But it is available in Manila, and they WILL send a crew to Cebu to install it. Or...you can read what I said in the PV thread.

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tomaw

In both California and The Philippines I've seen the rounded Spanish clay tile roofs on more expensive homes. I like the look, they last a long time and help insulate the home. Im just not sure about what goes underneath them or what they cost in Cebu.

Edited by tomaw
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tomaw

 

No. But it is available in Manila, and they WILL send a crew to Cebu to install it. Or...you can read what I said in the PV thread.

.......... Thanks. I'll check it out.
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In both California and The Philippines I've seen the rounded Spanish clay tile roofs on more expensive homes. I like the look, they last a long time and help insulate the home. Im just not sure about what goes underneath them or what they cost in Cebu.

 

I have wondered about the clay tile roofs. You actually seldom see them in the Philippines, but they are here. I have to believe that the only reason you see them at all here is the Spanish influence from colonial days. Clay tile roofs are very good at keeping out a little rain, they are easy to replace (single tiles) if they break, and they generally last a very long time under normal conditions. They also ventilate very well in sunny conditions, because there is no underlayment layer beneath them and air can escape through thousands of holes in the roof. Essentially, each tile has gaps around it where it interacts with other imperfect tiles. with a good breeze that will keep the roof well ventilated and cool, but therein lies the rub. In Typhoon conditions, rain will be pushed between tiles and will end up inside the home because a tile roof doesn't repel horizontal rain very well. If you are lucky, the wind won't be strong enough to lift tiles on the windward side...because if it is...the wind can literally explode a tile roof. Because of this, most roofs you see here in the Philippines that look like tile are actually metal roofs manufactured to give a tile look. If you look at the picture I posted previously in this topic, you will see what I am talking about by metal roofing made to look like tile.

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smokey

vent.jpg

 

I'm looking to install a couple of these to vent the roof, when i get round to building, wind powered, turbo extactors,

 

Maybe fit one to vent the roof space and make a piped central extractor to vent bedrooms with a vent in each ceiling

 

i asked my wife about these for our house and she said NO ... because the house will look like a bodega 

Edited by Headshot
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Knowdafish

It does from far away, but when you are painting it you notice it is a kind of battleship grey.

I saw a sample of it painted on a white background today at the local Handyman Hardware store here in Dumaguete. Compared to the white background it IS a light grey! 

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tomaw

 

Personally, if I was have another house built in the Philippines, I would go for a BIPV Roof.

 

BIPV - Building Integrated Photo Voltaic

 

Instead of bolting PV Solar Panels to an existing Roof (that might need strengthening, to take the extra weight). why not employ a roofing structure that is designed for PV use?

 

There are several types but basically for normal roof (as opposed to Terrace and Car Port shades), it can be BIPV Standing seam, or BIPV 'Tiles'.

 

englert-sunnet-solar-standing-seam-roof-

 

BIPV_module_solar_roof_tile_55W.jpg

 

bipv1.jpg

 

POWERHOUSE-Solar-Shingle_12.091.jpg

PV 'Shingles'?

 

 

492118570_253.jpg

 

1263861226170_hz_myalibaba_web11_15867.j

 

Whilst looking for images of such BIPV Roofing, found this one that give Solar Electric and Solar Hot Water:-

 

Snack on the Sun with a Solar Sandwich

By archives on Sep. 8, 2011 | Topics: Solar | Comments (10)

Solar-Sandwich-by-Englert-568x375.jpg

New Jersey-based Englert, a company that specializes in metal roofing and gutter systems, recently earned a citation from Architect Magazine for their incredible Solar Sandwichroof system. On the surface, it looks like any other standing-seam metal roof with columns of thin-film photovoltaic solar. Yet below that, to capture the warmth generated from hot metal roofing, there’s a grid of pex-filled purlins with a water and glycol solution for a solar thermal system.

Solar-Sandwich-w-Glycol-568x375.jpg

The system connects with conventional heat transfer and distribution systems for residential and commercial hot water systems, radiant floor heating systems, and swimming pool heaters, according to Englert.

Dawn Solar Systems makes the solar thermal component, while the thin-film PV aspect is similar to what’s provided in the EnergyPeak system with Uni-Solar PV laminates. In this case, it’s the SunNet BIPV system, which uses an Englert metal roof.

Solar-Sandwich-Roof-Installation-568x334

[+] Learn more about the Solar Sandwich from Englert.

http://www.englertinc.com/solar-energy-systems/solar-thermal-energy-systems.html

.......... I like this idea a lot in that it kills two birds with one stone providing a roof and solar energy at the same time. However I need to know about getting both the parts and the skilled labor in Cebu. Is either available anywhere near Cebu? My only other concern is what looks like a black color of the roof. This may defeat the cooling of the house. Edited by tomaw
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  • 2 weeks later...
jojogumabew

I have wondered about the clay tile roofs. You actually seldom see them in the Philippines, but they are here

I have a clay tile roof on our house in Manila and was planning on putting painted cement roof tiles (called tegula here) on a metal roof on a house we ended up selling instead. 

 

The clay roof tiles in most houses I have seen, use sheet metal underneath. It's really expensive (P2-3+k per sqm just for the tiles), plus the sheet metal, plus the additional structure to carry a much heavier roof. I've not seen a clay roof without steel in Ph (i have seen it in other countries). Tegula is supposed to last just as long as clay, but are 40-50% cheaper. You still need the metal  and I believe it is slightly heavier than clay.

 

They are cooler and quieter than an uninsulated steel roof. This is not what our US trained architect tells us (clay/cement are heat sinks and will absorb and continue to radiate heat after the sun has set). Maybe the steel sheet reflects back the heat.

 

For our new house, clay/tegula was just too expensive - Maybe 3x what we wanted to spend. We are using steel, with the bubble foil insulation and 3 inches of fire retardant white styrofoam underneath (inserted between the 6 inch purlins). Then closed off with a fiber-cement ceiling. The roof is prepainted galvalume, with hidden clips so there are no exposed screws. THeoretically we should have less corrosion and leaks (we are by the sea)

 

We have a lot of natural ventilation planned.

 

Our roof is almost completely installed and we are starting on the styro insulation. I hope this all works. We are building the house ourselves without a general contractor.

Edited by jojogumabew
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Headshot

Do you have pictures of your house project? I'm sure everyone would love to see them...especially what you're doing with the roof.

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  • 2 weeks later...
jojogumabew

I was reluctant to post pix because our house crosses the boundary into over the top. But I've gotten a lot of help from this forum so I decided to share.

 

Anyway, our house is a dream house for my wife and I. It's really a great location in Batangas, on a low cliff with a path to the beach and beside a park. We've decided to have a nice house on the beach rather than a nice house in Manila.

 

We have what our archi calls a floating roof (i.e. it is held up by wooden stands and there will be glass in between the roof and the beams and will look like it's floating at night). We are right in the path of the habagat, so our roof is over engineered (60 cm between purlins, 1.5mm thick galvanized purlins, etc).

 

The insulation seems to work well. I touched the hardiflex ceiling at around 1pm the other day (granted it was not such a hot day) and the ceiling was cool. Actually just the bubble foil insulation ( we are using double bubble) is a big help. The ceiling underneath the eaves (no styro) was closer to ambient temp, but not hot either.

 

I'm showing pics of the insulation, the close up of the clip from the sample roof from the supplier, and some pics of the location. 

 

 

 

Do you have pictures of your house project? I'm sure everyone would love to see them...especially what you're doing with the roo

post-13504-0-33075100-1371291058_thumb.jpg

post-13504-0-96874100-1371291094_thumb.jpg

post-13504-0-56984800-1371291123_thumb.jpg

post-13504-0-39488500-1371291196_thumb.jpg

post-13504-0-11035700-1371291593_thumb.jpg

post-13504-0-37996600-1371291773_thumb.jpg

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