Jump to content

Using a Bicycle - convenient, useful. or not worth the bother?


David_LivinginTalisay

Recommended Posts

David_LivinginTalisay

Riding a Bicycle is a low cost of transportation, and gets you from A to B, quicker than walking, I am sure many will agree,

But what do you do with the bicycle when not riding it?

There is the risk it might get stolen.

 

What if you are travelling further, by Bus, or Train, or even by aeroplane?  


What can you do with the bicyle, before or after these longer distance and even quicker forms of transport?

 

Could the answer be a folding, transportable bicycle?

 

Most 'folding bicycles', avilable until fairly recently, were still heavy an inconvenient, albeit they took up less space, but not exactly 'conveneient' to lug around, unless being carried int he boot/trunk of a car.

Sir Clive Sinclair, may be considered a 'wacky' inventor, but his genious was the inventiveness of his ideas, rather than the practical delivery to market, along with good production designs that were marketable, reliable and importantly successful sales.

 

 

laun.jpg
Sir Clive Sinclair with his latest invention, the A-bike

I received an e-mail from Groupon Philippines 

I wont give the details in case it construed as 'Advertising'.  

I will say that with a Voucher, it can be bought, in the Philippines, for Php3,499


1367551671343.jpg
 

1367551671758.jpg

 

Instead I will give details of what I descovered about this design of a folding bicycle by Sir Clive Sinclair
and the partnership with 
 'Daka Designs' of HKG

Do a 'Google' search on 'A-Bike' or 'A-Bicycle'

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A-bike

http://www.gizmag.com/urbantransport/

 

 

 

 

 
 
World's smallest and lightest foldable bicycle

By Mike Hanlon

June 25, 2006

5789_260606115037.jpg

World's smallest and lightest foldable bicycle

5789_260606114749.jpg
 

5789_260606114809.jpg

5789_260606115037.jpg

June 26, 2006 Fold-up bikes are certainly not new though none to date have deserved the moniker "portable". Most use the same heavy chain sets and bulky 16 to 20 inch wheels and traditional materials and are at best luggable. The A-Bike is a folding pushbike that is claimed to be small enough so that you can take it on public transport with a no-bicycles policy. The US$300 A-bike utilises automotive grade, engineering polymers for its structural components, saddle and handlebars and has a level of stiffness, fatigue and impact resistance comparable with aero-grade aluminium. By using these new materials, the A-bike's weight has been reduced to just 5.5 kg (12 lbs), which is manageable for even slightly-built individuals. Whatsmore, it can be folded inside 10 seconds into a compact 26" x 12" x 6" (66 x 30 x 15 cm) package and has pneumatic tyres, so riding it will not dislodge the fillings in your teeth. In our opinion, the A-Bike looks to be the first viable foldable bike for those who wish to mix modes of transport and we see it as invaluable for yachts and motorhomes and campers where a simple vehicle for short-distances is a boon but storage space is limited.

The A-Bike offers many advantages over existing folding bicycles, the key being true portability. With or without its carrier case, the A-Bike can be hand-carried anywhere – on public transport, taken into stores or stored in school lockers. It is also easily stowed on boats and yachts, fits into standard luggage and takes up minimal room in a car trunk. A glance will tell you it was designed inside a computer, and it truly is an innovative design that uses high strength engineering polymers fused with aero grade aluminium to achieve its weight goals without sacrificing strength and durability. Accordingly, we rate the A-Bike a genuine breakthrough product.

Targeted at the urban consumer and weighing only 5.5 kg (12 lbs) the A-Bike folds into a compact volume of less than 0.03 cubic meters (1.1 cubic feet) and takes a mere ten seconds to unfold or fold. Importantly, the design of the A-Bike is such that it adjusts to fits all riders. There's even a compatible high capacity lighting system available that doesn't compromise the folding.

It also has a highly efficient, two-stage chain transmission that incorporates a high quality freewheel and is totally enclosed to protect clothing from grease. It also has very small pneumatic tires which, based on recent valve developments, offer an extremely comfortable ride. The tire's inner tubes can be removed and repaired in the same way as a larger bicycle tire.

Jointly developed by legendary English inventor Sir Clive Sinclair (Sinclair Research Ltd ) and Hong Kong-based Group Daka Designs, the A-bike is due for release in the UK and Japan in the next month.

Daka has been working together with Sinclair Research since 1999, when it obtained a world-wide exclusive license for Sinclair patents relating to motor-drive technology. Since then, the companies have jointly taken to market products like the wheelchair drive unit and the sea scooter.

Dimensions

Unfolded:

Height: 37 inches / 94 cm Length: 35 inches / 89 cm Width: 16.5 inches / 42 cm

Folded:

Height: 26 inches / 66 cm Length: 12 inches / 30 cm Width: 6 inches /15 cm

Volume:

Unfolded: 12.5 cu ft / 0.35 cubic meters Folded: 1.1 cu ft / 0.03 cubic meters

 

 

 

That Wikipedia entry on A-bike is what got me thinking, one could carry it in a rucksack, on a bus, or a train, or even a plane?

 

The A-bike is a type of folding bicycle invented by Sir Clive Sinclair in the United Kingdom and released on 12 July 2006. It weighs 5.5 kilograms (12 lb) and folds to 67×30×16 cm, small enough to fit in a rucksack.

 

One is allowed up to 7Kg as carry-on for a plane I believe?

http://www.sinclairzx.com/spec-a-bike.html   Lists the 'A-Bike' as GBP299

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/magazine/5173612.stm

 

Expert's handle

The seat and handlebars would have to change, says bike shop worker Lance Foster. They're not comfortable enough and too narrow to get maximum speed going on London's streets.

Despite feeling "unstable on the turn" he says he can see the advantages of it as a "folder".

 

 

The Price via Groupon Philippines @ Php3499 instead of Php7,500 makes it look attractive,, but is it 'practical'?

 

A price for 1 off via http://www.made-in-china.com (for minummum of 20) is US $ 64.5/ Piece is Php2,700

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Half Baked

How in the world are Filipinos gonna attach a sidecar to that thing? :ROFLMAO:

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
Canuck Joe

perfect for the mall or big airports

Link to post
Share on other sites
udonthani

at least you'd be able to save on the 200 pesos or so it costs to get stand up pedal cycles on ferries, when motorbikes cost like 700. Some places, pedal cycles are not bad. Bantayan is OK for pedal cycles. I used to have one there for just going around Santa Fe, where it was not much different to having a motorbike really except not so easy to go two's up on one. There are no hills at all and the island is not large. However it is of course just as hot as anywhere else which makes cycling not as much fun, as when it is cooler.  You are guranteed to stink much more whenever you arrive anywhere on a pedal cycle than you will on a motorbike.

Link to post
Share on other sites
David_LivinginTalisay

It not a long distance alternative to conventional bicycles with gears.

 

When I worked in London (seconded to Mercury Communications with Cable & Wireless), I was initially commuting from Mudeford, Christchurch.  I bought a used Honda C70 with windshiled and lackable 'Craven' Top Box that would easily take my full face crash helmet and waterproofs.  Parking at Hinton Admiral Station (or Christchurch) was free,

At the other end - Waterloo Station, it meant taking 1 or 2 tube lines and walking from either High Holborn or Chancery Lane (or Russel Square)Tube as the MCL Office was in John St. off Theobalds Rd. (not far from the 'Yorkshire Grey' pub, and Charles Darwin House).  Buses were sometimes better, and walking took too long as it was far too long a 'commute', as it was.  


I took to staying @ Cable & Wireless 'Exiles Club', Meadowbank, Richmond, Mon through Thur nights, as it was under an hour on the District Line to Waterloo Station, compared to over 2.5 hours by train, from Christchurch .  It was a longish walk into Richmond Station also.

Such a compact, foldable bike, that can fit in a rucksack and weighing on 5 kilos, would have been perfect to get to and fro from the stations in London.

 

I eventually sold the nice house in Christchurch and bought in Woking.  Only good things about Woking was the landing spot for 'War of the Worlds', and 6 trains to London at peak gours, non-stop (25 moinutes).  

 

I still used my Honda C70, to get to Woking Station (also Free Parking pfr Motorcyles).  But having that compact, small ;ightweight folding bike for, Waterloo to/from the Office would have been great.  On fine days, could have left the C70 at home!

Last #13 Bus from Mianyang City, back to the School, is 21:30! 

A foldable bike, is a lot cheaper than a Taxi (and finding one willing to go there, is almost impossible, unless you agree to pay the Fare back also!).

 

Edited by David_LivinginTalisay
Link to post
Share on other sites
Knowdafish

They sell different variations of folding bikes here in Dumaguete. Ones with larger wheels handle rough surfaces better than ones with small wheels. The one the op posted is cool and practical in limited situations, but unfortunately the Philippines does not have many of those "situations". One decent sized rock or pot hole would send bike and rider to the ground. 

Edited by Knowdafish
Link to post
Share on other sites
KID

No Thanks,

I would be 1 rock away from having more piercings than the kids at the Music Store :)

 

Wouldn't a scooter be more beneficial at that size?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Sven
They sell different variations of folding bikes here in Dumaguete. Ones with larger wheels handle rough surfaces better than ones with small wheels..

 

Yes the size of the wheels means a lot more than gears, etc.

With those tiny wheels, the vehicle would be suitable only for indoors use, I think. Maybe good for airports.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Thelandofku-an

An ad in the Sun-Star Cebu offers ex-Japan secondhand folding bicycles...

Link to post
Share on other sites
SkyMan

 

but unfortunately the Philippines does not have many of those "situations". One decent sized rock or pot hole would send bike and rider to the ground.

Not just to the ground but on your face.
Link to post
Share on other sites
KennyF

A buddy of mine on Camiguin island has both a 600 Honda and a mountain bike.

He has never had an accident on the Honda but has has two on the pushbike.

 

He puts it down to people not hearing that you're there.

 

KonGC

Link to post
Share on other sites
Thelandofku-an

They sell different variations of folding bikes here in Dumaguete. Ones with larger wheels handle rough surfaces better than ones with small wheels. The one the op posted is cool and practical in limited situations, but unfortunately the Philippines does not have many of those "situations". One decent sized rock or pot hole would send bike and rider to the ground. 

Perhaps a "Pennyfarthing" would best cope with the Valencia road, folding would be of little use with it?

Link to post
Share on other sites
spritsail

The most comfortable bike is the dutch Gazelle ladies bike, 28inch wheels, back pedal brakes,. You see thousands of dutch ladies (and a few gents) riding them along the cobbled street of Amsterdam and Delft. Best bike ever made and wish many times I could ship mine here. Lots of cyclists here now in Camiguin, although many just for sports and not everyday shopping trips.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The most comfortable bike is the dutch Gazelle ladies bike, 28inch wheels, back pedal brakes,. You see thousands of dutch ladies (and a few gents) riding them along the cobbled street of Amsterdam and Delft. Best bike ever made and wish many times I could ship mine here. Lots of cyclists here now in Camiguin, although many just for sports and not everyday shopping trips.  

 

 

Coming from the netherlands i can't do anything but relate to that..

Somehow we Dutchies have sturdy freaking bikes that will with minimal effort of maintance hold on for a good 10 years, even driving them to shit (basically offroading them)

Comparing that to chinese or japanese bikes i find here. Most of them don't seem very sturdy let alone seem to survive the tell tale of time.

 

 

 

On driving a paddle bike/push bike/ Lets just call it a bicycle.

It truly depends on where you live and what you need to do on it.

In the city i wouldn't risk my life trying to converge through traffic and the heat (even though I easily manage on a motorbike)

But in the province for like a little ride going to the market or sari-sari store that's a little further i love it. But you do have shade their most of the time so the heat doesn't kill you.

 

The cute little folding bike you show (david_talisay), definitely wouldn't like to have one like that in the PH. Maybe if you live in a good upscale subdivision with nice roads other then that i reckon it will be dumped behind your house or in a shed not being used.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..

Capture.JPG

I Understand...