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Taking GF to US for Family Visit


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USMC-Retired

Yes and I added to it with the specific section they'd be denied under for anyone curious since the letter said nothing about 214b or an appeals process if available.

 

The fourth line of the letter references 214b it also states the appeals process near the bottom.  You must not have read it or just posted before reading it.  

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That's quite correct, Filipinos can thank their fellow countrymen and women for their denials not only in the US but elsewhere. China is getting hard to get visas now for Filipinos as well because the

Get tickets to Mexico. Pay someone to sneak the both of you across the border and she can stay as long as she wants. When caught, they will be happy to fly her back to the RP, compliments of the US ta

Here is the what the website says.       This is what the official word from a Senior US Senator written to me about getting a tourist visa.     Click Here

USMC-Retired

No one can force a counselor to approve or deny a visa application   However you do have the right to reconsideration at no cost for 1 year following the denial.  

 

Request for Reconsideration
While consular decisions are non-reviewable, it is important to remember that all consular officers do not think alike. After a careful review of the facts and circumstances surrounding a visa refusal, a request for reconsideration of the visa refusal may be appropriate. If so, the refused applicant is permitted one year from the date of the denial or refusal in which to request reconsideration without the need for the filing of a new application or fee. Motions to Reconsider before the consular officers should be professionally presented, and include all relevant legal explanation and documentary evidence.

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Headshot

I know.  Two of the interviews or his brother he got  in and left within 20 seconds because they already knew him and knew it would be a denial, this is with houses in his name, he owned 3 successful (by local standards) businesses and his father is ill and not expected to live more then a couple years, but they still say not enough ties to the country. 

 

As long as there is no appeals process nothing will change, they have no reason to be fair and impartial, if they don't like your attitude, denied.  Having a bad day? Denied.  Does it happen alot?  Maybe not but the point is there is zero accountability or recourse, even senators or the president can only inquire as to the status but can't influence or direct them to approve it anyway.

 

It doesn't matter to the consular officer whether they or you are having a good or bad day. They are following US State Department policy to deny almost all tourist visa applications in the Philippines. Until that policy changes (don't hold your breath), they will continue to deny 99% of all applications.

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They are following US State Department policy to deny almost all tourist visa applications in the Philippines.

 

I never said this case was regarding the Philippines so i'm not sure how that policy, which I'd love to see in writing, would affect it.

 

They deny 99% of applicants because those applicants come from poor families and are presumed to be seeking work and illegal immigration to the US.  I doubt there's an official policy  beyond 214b which is quite clear in stating the immigration presumption.

 

 

The fourth line of the letter references 214b it also states the appeals process near the bottom.  You must not have read it or just posted before reading it.  

 

 

I didn't notice the click here so no I didn't read it.  Regardless I was only adding my .02, sorry if it bothered you as you seem to have taken offense.

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USMC-Retired

Yes and I added to it with the specific section they'd be denied under for anyone curious since the letter said nothing about 214b or an appeals process if available.

 

I didn't notice the click here so no I didn't read it.  Regardless I was only adding my .02, sorry if it bothered you as you seem to have taken offense.

Actually what you said does not bother me.  It is  that you state that the letter was lacking.  When you did not even read it.   Which it was not and covered your post.

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SkyMan

 

I never said this case was regarding the Philippines so i'm not sure how that policy, which I'd love to see in writing, would affect it.

Might be coming to a wikileaks near you.  It's probably not in writing though.  The RP has 2 strikes against it.  A past record of overstaying and a large pinoy community in the US making it rather easy to hide.
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Monsoon

Might be coming to a wikileaks near you.  It's probably not in writing though.  The RP has 2 strikes against it.  A past record of overstaying and a large pinoy community in the US making it rather easy to hide.

 

That's quite correct, Filipinos can thank their fellow countrymen and women for their denials not only in the US but elsewhere. China is getting hard to get visas now for Filipinos as well because they over stay. I read today that 40% of illegal immigrants in the US arrived by plane and overstayed. The other disadvantage a lot of Filipinos have in this process is so many of them have family in the US. That is a big indicator of immigration risk. The consulate then assumes they have a much easier means to immigrate. The first question they ask is always, "What is the purpose of your travel?" and for so many of them the answer is, "Going to visit my (sister/aunt/uncle/cousin) in ________. "

 

I wouldn't go so far as to say its next to impossible. My wife is married to an American, and she doesn't own any property, and is not employed (although she was previously employed). She was approved first time through for a 10 year B1/B2. She did present her self well at the embassy, dressed professionally and did have a stack of documents she could show, although they only asked to see our marriage license. She was also 100% honest with everything asked, and she also knew why they were asking certain questions so she could provide a response that appropriately conveys evidence to the interviewer about her ties here.

 

The OP's GF probably has as decent a shot as anyone. That shot would probably increase if they were engaged or married and long term residing in the Philippines especially since he is not an American. Further, I know a Filipina who has an English partner who was granted a US tourist visa. She brought with her a lot of supporting evidence to substantiate their relationship.

 

Also to the OP - you will have a much easier time getting a UK visa for your GF. I have many friends who have gotten them first time through.

 

Also Schengen visas are pretty straightforward and rather easy to get. Just tick the boxes.

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tripsigg

My understanding is that if a Filipina is married to a US citizen and they are living in the Philippines, it is almost impossible for her to get a tourist visa to the US... It's in a way absurd that he could not take his wife to visit his own country...

 

 

If she is married to a UK (or French, German, etc.) citizen, I wonder if it would be easier for his Filipina wife to get a tourist visa to the US?

 

Not true...I'm calling BS on this. My wife got a 10 year multi entry visa to the US just a few months ago. She was up front that she had no ties at all to the Philippines and just wanted to visit the US. 

 

It was easy and straightforward. If you look at the stats on the web, visa refusal rates for Manila are less than 30%, that means 70% of the apps get approved. 

 

Like Monsoon's experience, ours was similar. She dressed modestly and plain, long skirt and plain blouse without makeup. She smiled through the interview and answered every question truthfully. The interview took a few minutes and she was approved. 

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If you look at the stats on the web, visa refusal rates for Manila are less than 30%, that means 70% of the apps get approved. 

 

I suppose these were the stats you were referring to.

 

http://travel.state.gov/pdf/refusalratelanguage.pdf

 

It would be nice if they would break it out to show refusal rates for spouses of US citizens vs. other classes of non-immigrant visa applicants. Included in these statistics are crews of ships, who are almost always granted a visa along with businessmen, politicians and their families, celebrities, whatever. Frankly, from what I have seen personally, the statistics do not reflect reality for the legal spouses of American citizens...not even close.

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JackJohnson

That's quite correct, Filipinos can thank their fellow countrymen and women for their denials not only in the US but elsewhere. China is getting hard to get visas now for Filipinos as well because they over stay. I read today that 40% of illegal immigrants in the US arrived by plane and overstayed. The other disadvantage a lot of Filipinos have in this process is so many of them have family in the US. That is a big indicator of immigration risk. The consulate then assumes they have a much easier means to immigrate. The first question they ask is always, "What is the purpose of your travel?" and for so many of them the answer is, "Going to visit my (sister/aunt/uncle/cousin) in ________. "

 

I wouldn't go so far as to say its next to impossible. My wife is married to an American, and she doesn't own any property, and is not employed (although she was previously employed). She was approved first time through for a 10 year B1/B2. She did present her self well at the embassy, dressed professionally and did have a stack of documents she could show, although they only asked to see our marriage license. She was also 100% honest with everything asked, and she also knew why they were asking certain questions so she could provide a response that appropriately conveys evidence to the interviewer about her ties here.

 

The OP's GF probably has as decent a shot as anyone. That shot would probably increase if they were engaged or married and long term residing in the Philippines especially since he is not an American. Further, I know a Filipina who has an English partner who was granted a US tourist visa. She brought with her a lot of supporting evidence to substantiate their relationship.

 

Also to the OP - you will have a much easier time getting a UK visa for your GF. I have many friends who have gotten them first time through.

 

Also Schengen visas are pretty straightforward and rather easy to get. Just tick the boxes.

 

No way have "40%" of the illegals arrived by plane! HAHA! The ran over the southern border, most of them, I'll bet 98%.

It's a damn shame an American citizen has such a hard time getting a visa for a wife or GF, when MILLIONS of mexicans just amble

into this country and get free everything. I can't make sense of it.

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Monsoon

No way have "40%" of the illegals arrived by plane! HAHA! The ran over the southern border, most of them, I'll bet 98%.

It's a damn shame an American citizen has such a hard time getting a visa for a wife or GF, when MILLIONS of mexicans just amble

into this country and get free everything. I can't make sense of it.

 

Yea, that's where 60% come from... I was talking about the other 40%. They arrive from elsewhere, typically by plane. There aren't many illegals taking repositioning cruise to enter and overstay in America.

 

 

http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2013/04/08/Illegal-immigration-overstay-visas

Roughly 40%  of the 11 million undocumented workers in the United States are foreigners who came legally mostly through visas but have overstayed the length of the visas or overstayed their legal residence here, the Wall Street Journal reported on Monday. These immigrants did not cross the U.S. border with stealth but rather obeyed the laws when they arrived. The scant hard evidence about this group indicates that they are better educated than non-visa illegal immigrants, and often speak English with greater fluency. They also tend to emigrate from Europe, Asia and Africa,  rather than Central and South America. In many cases, they used tourist visas to enter the U.S.

 

Sen. Jeff Flake (R., Ariz.), who is working on the Senate immigration bill, “Whenever I use that statistic, people seem completely surprised. They assume that, yeah, some people overstay—but 40% of the illegal population here?" Flake commented that a sizable group of the overstayers exceeded the time limit on H-1B visas, which apply to highly skilled workers

 

 

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/3012385/posts?page=17

 

Today, some 11 million "undocumented workers" live in the shadows in the United States. Sixty percent of them crossed the Mexican border or the Canadian border without government approval and 40% arrived by plane and overstayed their visas.

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Monsoon

I suppose these were the stats you were referring to.

 

http://travel.state.gov/pdf/refusalratelanguage.pdf

 

It would be nice if they would break it out to show refusal rates for spouses of US citizens vs. other classes of non-immigrant visa applicants. Included in these statistics are crews of ships, who are almost always granted a visa along with businessmen, politicians and their families, celebrities, whatever. Frankly, from what I have seen personally, the statistics do not reflect reality for the legal spouses of American citizens...not even close.

 

I'd speculate that they didn't wake up one day and decide, "Let's deny the vast majority of American citizen spouses."

 

I will bet this 'policy' is data driven.

 

I was in a US Embassy in Asia (not the Philippines) for 40 minutes waiting for pages to be added to my passport once about 3 years ago. This embassy is much smaller than the Manila embassy and I could basically hear everybody's business being transacted at the window. In my short time there I listened to 4 men talk about how they had met a girl for the first time after chatting on the internet and swore they loved her and she loved him. I can tell you none of these guys where Brad Pitt doppelgangers. And the culture in this particular country is that where marriages and courtship take a year minimum. But they all swore there was no marriage fraud about to take place. Even when the consulate asked one man if he was aware that his 'sweetheart" had been the subject of 5 prior fiancé visa applications. Man, that was only a 40 minute snapshot. Imagine what they get day in and day out...

 

Another very unscientific snapshot of statistics for me is I have a long time acquaintance who met his illegally overstayed wife in the US. She is Asian. He married her. She got deported and he spent the next 3 years trying to get her back to the US legally. She originally went to the states on a fiancé visa. He later learned that she was flagged in the consular database as a perpetrator of marriage fraud. Even after all of that, she was eventually granted a permanent residency. So, they even let the documented 'bad ones' in....

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I'd speculate that they didn't wake up one day and decide, "Let's deny the vast majority of American citizen spouses."

 

I will bet this 'policy' is data driven.

 

I was in a US Embassy in Asia (not the Philippines) for 40 minutes waiting for pages to be added to my passport once about 3 years ago. This embassy is much smaller than the Manila embassy and I could basically hear everybody's business being transacted at the window. In my short time there I listened to 4 men talk about how they had met a girl for the first time after chatting on the internet and swore they loved her and she loved him. I can tell you none of these guys where Brad Pitt doppelgangers. And the culture in this particular country is that where marriages and courtship take a year minimum. But they all swore there was no marriage fraud about to take place. Even when the consulate asked one man if he was aware that his 'sweetheart" had been the subject of 5 prior fiancé visa applications. Man, that was only a 40 minute snapshot. Imagine what they get day in and day out...

 

Another very unscientific snapshot of statistics for me is I have a long time acquaintance who met his illegally overstayed wife in the US. She is Asian. He married her. She got deported and he spent the next 3 years trying to get her back to the US legally. She originally went to the states on a fiancé visa. He later learned that she was flagged in the consular database as a perpetrator of marriage fraud. Even after all of that, she was eventually granted a permanent residency. So, they even let the documented 'bad ones' in....

 

Immigrant visas and non-immigrant visa are two completely different things. If a man wants to take his fiance or spouse to the US, It is almost a certainty that she will get the visa (provided they can meet the visa requirements...which aren't that tough to meet..and provided she hasn't been red-flagged for some reason). Why then, with it so easy to get an immigrant visa, would anybody take their spouse to the US on a non-immigrant visa (which has much less chance of success if they are married)? That makes no sense to me, and the only thing that does make sense to me is that they are harrassing American men who choose to marry and live in the Philippines, rather than take their spouse to the US.

 

Very few of the approximately 300,000 illegal Filipinos in the US were married to a US citizen (living in the Philippines) and got to the US on a tourist visa. Most overstayed a work or school visa, went on a fiance visa and never got married but also didn't leave, or went on a tourist visa to visit friends or relatives living in the US. It is very rare when a Filipina married to a US citizen and living with him in the Philippines fails to return to the Philippines before her tourist visa runs out. Sorry, but there is a lot more to this than simple statistics saying that wives of US citizens are bad risks. If that was the case, they wouldn't be given immigrant visas either.

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tripsigg

I suppose these were the stats you were referring to.

 

http://travel.state.gov/pdf/refusalratelanguage.pdf

 

It would be nice if they would break it out to show refusal rates for spouses of US citizens vs. other classes of non-immigrant visa applicants. Included in these statistics are crews of ships, who are almost always granted a visa along with businessmen, politicians and their families, celebrities, whatever. Frankly, from what I have seen personally, the statistics do not reflect reality for the legal spouses of American citizens...not even close.

 

That would be nice, but there are at least 3 members on this board that have gotten their wives tourist visas WITHOUT having employment and property owned. That shows that it's not impossible. 

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dc3driver

Immigrant visas and non-immigrant visa are two completely different things. If a man wants to take his fiance or spouse to the US, It is almost a certainty that she will get the visa (provided they can meet the visa requirements...which aren't that tough to meet..and provided she hasn't been red-flagged for some reason). Why then, with it so easy to get an immigrant visa, would anybody take their spouse to the US on a non-immigrant visa (which has much less chance of success if they are married)? That makes no sense to me, and the only thing that does make sense to me is that they are harrassing American men who choose to marry and live in the Philippines, rather than take their spouse to the US.

 

Very few of the approximately 300,000 illegal Filipinos in the US were married to a US citizen (living in the Philippines) and got to the US on a tourist visa. Most overstayed a work or school visa, went on a fiance visa and never got married but also didn't leave, or went on a tourist visa to visit friends or relatives living in the US. It is very rare when a Filipina married to a US citizen and living with him in the Philippines fails to return to the Philippines before her tourist visa runs out. Sorry, but there is a lot more to this than simple statistics saying that wives of US citizens are bad risks. If that was the case, they wouldn't be given immigrant visas either.

A fiancée visa to the USA is considered a non-immigrant visa.....

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