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Foreign money exchange: torn, marked bills accepted for pesos?


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questsea73

When traveling to Thailand I would, in long ago past, be sure to bring the cleanest, brightest, untorn, unmarked $100 bills my bank could scrounge up to be sure the banks would accept them when I needed baht for the local economy expenditures

 

I'll be into this visit the bank here in USA this week for same deal but for P.I..  Should I be doing the same thing....avoiding any bills with obvious cosmetic defects?

 

Ken

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BossHog

Any very damaged USD bills I save up and spend at the US embassy for passports, notary, etc.

 

They can't turn down any bill now matter how torn and frayed as long as it's 51% intact.

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You would be wise to bring the cleanest notes possible.  I have had trouble in the past changing dirty/damaged notes.

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HeyMike

If things are the same when I came here 5 years ago, then bring clean bills. Try to make sure there are no rubber stamp marks on them for any reason, and any writing on the bills may cause problems.

 

Things may have gotten better, but if you can, bring clean bills.

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johnboy999

It's too late when you get here and find they won't accept any bills, so it's much better to make your life easier here and just bring clean, undamaged bills. Last time I changed up some foreign currency here, they checked every one for damage, but I made sure I brought nice crisp fresh notes

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smokey

1996 is hard to change seems that is a common date used on the fakes of yesteryear 

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USMC-Retired

Any very damaged USD bills I save up and spend at the US embassy for passports, notary, etc.

 

They can't turn down any bill now matter how torn and frayed as long as it's 51% intact.

Not totally true.  You must have the serial number displayed on both sides.  If it is missing the serial number on either side it must go to the federal reserve for replacement.  

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udonthani

they are not actually all that fussy in the Philippines about used bills. A bit, but they are not totally nuts about it. I think this one can be overstressed. Although seeing as you have the choice, far better to ensure that the bills are in good condition. I always do ask the forex place in the UK to come up with new bills. I tell them that they don't have to be mint, but that they do have to be quite new. I had one $100 refused once that having looked it over and saw it was not in great nick, had thought that it might be - and it was. But that was only one exchanger. The next place was not so fussy as the first place I asked, and they accepted it five minutes later.

 

also they are only seem to be fussy about US bills, and seem to be not that bothered about others. I've turned up at Manila with dog-eared fivers I just took off the street of a council estate in Yorkshire the day before, and they accepted them without comment.

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Skywalker

I bring brand new GBP50 notes, as the money changers will often give a better rate of exchange, specially in Thailand, but I have noticed in many other Countries in the region. I usually use Chinese money changers since they give the best rates, will often negotiate rates, and are used to foreign notes. The Banks are pretty much always the worst rates.

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Thalcoozyo

Agree with most of what is said here.   Clean, non-marked, non-stamped, non-heavily-creased, non-torn bills are definitely best to have.  However, brand new clean crisp bills "just off the press" have (for me) caused as much problems as old, torn, dirty bills.  I go to my bank and explain what is needed and they can always accommodate me in providing "gently worn" bills. My info & experience is less than 12 months old.

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udonthani

it's OK to fold them in half if you want to save space in your pouch. That does not crease them hardly at all. But it is not OK, as I found out years ago in an overzealous bid to save space, to roll them up in like a cylinder and then tie it up with with elastic bands. That might save space but it makes the money look bad when you unroll the wad.

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RogerDat

Greetings! I have not been to US in 7 years, are they still using the brightly colored notes that North Korea is counterfitting? I had trouble changing thoes here in Cebu. Only my bank would take them as the counterfit ones are almost undetectable, only the seriasl # is the give away, so if mine turned out bad, they knew where they came from. Also, I have not seen any of the new notes here in several years.

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