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13a Permanent status is not really a visa. You have life time Immigrant status in the Philippines. Just like green card holders do not need a visa to live in America. Life-time is life-time. In the US it's 2 years of marriage/residence in America. In the Philippines it's one year residence(with no checks to physical presence, ahem).

Only on Provisional Status. Permanent is permanent. Once you Immigrate, no one can take that away from you!

 

To be qualified to hold a 13A visa, you must be...

 

The wife or the husband or the unmarried child under twenty-one. years of age of a Philippine citizen.

 

If you get a divorce, you are no longer qualified to hold a 13A visa. When it comes to foreigners in the Philippines, NOTHING is permanent (even though your ACR-I card says it is). If you think it is, then you are just fooling yourself.  In addition to staying married, you have to renew your ACR-I card every five years, and you have to attend the annual report every year. If you fail to do so, you can lose your 13A visa even if you are still married. The 13A visa IS a visa. A green card in the US allows you to work toward citizenship. There is no way to use a 13A to gain Philippine citizenship. There is no comparison between the 13A visa in the Philippines and a green card in the US. You are making a mistake if you think Philippine law has ANYTHING in common with US law.

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USMC-Retired

You are given an ACR-I card with a 13a with ICR number.  There is only one type of card. The numbers differ yet the card remains the same.  Yet a 13a holder is not given an ACR number but an ICR number.  What ever difference that makes in life.  It gives your status on the card also as a 13a holder.

Edited by USMC-Retired
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Woolf

can someone translate "sarap ang aso", tagalog or bisaya/cebuano ?

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SkyMan

Sarap is tagalog. 

"Bisaya" is not really a language. Just a region

Technically true the language is Bisayan/Visayan, not Bisaya/Visaya.

 

He thinks dogs are delicious.

Edited by SkyMan
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Jim Sibbick

Please keep on topic and discuss languages in another topic.

 

In case you are unaware, going off topic or posting unrelated information in a thread is now a banning offence

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The difference is an "alien" is a guest, who can be removed anytime, for anything. An "immigrant" has lifetime, permanent status. 

 

In most cases of the law that applies to an "alien", such does not apply to the immigrant. The immigrant generally falls under the same laws as the Filipino. For example, the immigrant cannot hold public office, nor purchase land. However, an  immigrant can hold any job in the Philippines  with equal hiring preference as a Filipino, can own 100% of his own business, can attend any school at the normal tuition, can possess firearms, vote in provincial elections, and many other rights. 

 

Most "aliens" here have almost zero rights. This is one of the severe problems with the "expat" phenomenon that gets propagated online. Being an immigrant is a very high honor. Just under being a Filipino, which you say in your other post is "a joke"...

Do you have any link confirming that?

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Monsoon

WHoever said that the 13A visa (or any Visa granted by the Philippine government for that matter) is irrevocable is INCORRECT. And does not know what they are talking about.

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WHoever said that the 13A visa (or any Visa granted by the Philippine government for that matter) is irrevocable is INCORRECT. And does not know what they are talking about.

ANY government have the right to do so, if you break there laws...but if not..Is there any example of this has happened ´cos of a "mad" wife, as mentioned in OP?

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Monsoon

ANY government have the right to do so, if you break there laws...but if not..Is there any example of this has happened ´cos of a "mad" wife, as mentioned in OP?

 

One wouldn't even have to break 'their' laws...

 

Example #1 - Lose your passport for any reason, lose your Philippine visa, automatically.

 

As for 'mad wife' if on probationary status, absolutely... Permanent, I'm don't know anyone who has been through that so can't attest and won't waste my time asking anyone who can tell me...

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