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500 PHP Forgeries


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SkyMan

Coins?  Who would bother faking a 5 or 10 peso coin?  Aside from the fact it would be very difficult to do, it wouldn't be worth the trouble.

Never seen fake p5s but p10s yes. You take a p1 and cut the right size hole to jam a c25 into it. rub it so it looks old and it probably wouldn't be noticed. It is a lot of work but you profit p8.75 woohoo. Easy to do a coupole dozen a day. Good money. Edited by SkyMan
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pay your next traffic bribe with it....roll it up with a one Hundred. Salamat Noy.....Vroooooom!

PHP001.jpg   The note above is fake.  It is printed on slightly thinner paper.  Note also the smudging and fading of the ink, particularly the numerics in the bottom right-hand corner.   PHP002.jp

I got one out of an ATM machine a few weeks ago. Saving it for a taxi driver who refuses to turn on the meter.

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Monsoon

I've just had a snoop around the internet and there are a few, very few, cases of ATMs giving out fakes but they all seem to be older style notes/ATMs.

A couple of reports in India and Africa.

Nothing at all for Australia, Canada or USA.

But Jim, I guess it is possible in some countries.

 

KonGC

Most modern bill counters used by banks have built in counterfit detection. Not ATMs (except the automated bill receiver type of deposit kiosks). I dealt with one of the worlds leaders in this for years. They also produce a lot of inks used in bill printing. They even print currency for several countries. They were at one time part of the London FTSE index. Cool technology.

 

 

Here in the Philippines bills pass through a counter and are manually counted before going into an ATM.

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liquido

A few years back I got stung while sitting in Chow King Gaisano Mactan having a conversation with a ladyfriend..This well dressed guy came up to our table having a 1000p note in hand asking for change..I said sure and handed him two 500p notes..He then took out another 1000p and asked if I could change another and for some reason I said no I do not have, but I did the change.He then thanked me and left...About 20 seconds later the hairs on my neck went up and I promptly looked at the 1000p note and found that it ripped easily.The guy was long gone..By asking for change a second time is what slowly triggered my mind into thinking oh shit..Stupid me I tryed to pass it in manila airport for the terminal fee .The lady right away saying this is fake and where did i get it.I told her from an ATM..She promptly wrote fake on it with a black marker.Im thinking if that would have happened in the states I would have been taken in the back room with a treasury agent grilling me..haha.Needless to say I NEVER give change anymore...

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udonthani

fake 10 peso coins are common. Being rich themselves a lot of foreigners don't seem to realise that 10 pesos is quite a lot of money in the Philippines. It's roughly equivalent to a UK £1 coin, in earning power and not far off it in spending power either. A jeepney fare of 8 pesos is only a similar service you get on a UK bus ride, which is almost never less than £1 these days.  And the UK is flooded with fake £1 coins.

 

the well dressed stranger coming up to you and asking you, the benign foreigner, to change them a fake 1000 is commonly reported in the Philippines. Just tell them to piss off just like you would at home. If somebody came up to you and asked you to change them US$100 or UK£50. You'd just say 'of course not. What the hell do you think I am, a bank or something?' But of course you may not behave like you normally would when the mercury gets above 30 in a foreign country. The scammers know this.

 

another common scam is when you hand over a genuine 1000 or 500 and then they switch it under the counter, and say 'sorry sir, the note is a forgery'. Never let the note out of your sight. I never experienced this in the Philippines, but in Cambodia, scams in restaurants switching bills, used to be common. So whenever I handed over a $50 to pay a bill, I made a note of the number before I handed it in and made sure the wait staff saw me doing it.

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liquido

fake 10 peso coins are common. Being rich themselves a lot of foreigners don't seem to realise that 10 pesos is quite a lot of money in the Philippines. It's roughly equivalent to a UK £1 coin, in earning power and not far off it in spending power either. A jeepney fare of 8 pesos is only a similar service you get on a UK bus ride, which is almost never less than £1 these days.  And the UK is flooded with fake £1 coins.

 

the well dressed stranger coming up to you and asking you, the benign foreigner, to change them a fake 1000 is commonly reported in the Philippines. Just tell them to piss off just like you would at home. If somebody came up to you and asked you to change them US$100 or UK£50. You'd just say 'of course not. What the hell do you think I am, a bank or something?' But of course you may not behave like you normally would when the mercury gets above 30 in a foreign country. The scammers know this.

 

another common scam is when you hand over a genuine 1000 or 500 and then they switch it under the counter, and say 'sorry sir, the note is a forgery'. Never let the note out of your sight. I never experienced this in the Philippines, but in Cambodia, scams in restaurants switching bills, used to be common. So whenever I handed over a $50 to pay a bill, I made a note of the number before I handed it in and made sure the wait staff saw me doing it.

If I remember at the time I was having an intense conversation with the ladyfriend which lowered my resistance to the scam..Anyways it cost me 1000p for the education I got.

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udonthani

it's true though. At home, if somebody approached you and asked you to change you $100 into $20s, there is no way you would do it if you didn't know them, even if you had the change. I often get people coming to my UK shop and asking me if I have change, when it's a £10 or £20 I will do it, after carefully scrutinising the bill. But if it's a £50 I wouldn't do it. I won't even accept a £50 note in payment for goods unless they show me ID. It's very rare they offer a £50 but when they do they won't be able to buy anything with it unless 1) they are an adult and 2) if they have ID on them. Fake £1 coins turn up all the time. They are like the 10 peso fake coins. When you get one of them as one of like 4 coins, and you look at the 4 coins in your hand, the fake one stands out a mile. But when it's just a single coin, the chances are good a vendor will just assume it is real, and pop it into the till without looking at it properly. I've taken quite a few fake £1 coins and never had any trouble spending them on. It is thought that the fake coin business accounts for quite a lot of cash floating around the UK economy, millions of pounds at any given moment. Unlike fake notes, which are not spent too many times before they are spotted and withdrawn, the fake coins keep sloshing around.

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liquido

it's true though. At home, if somebody approached you and asked you to change you $100 into $20s, there is no way you would do it if you didn't know them, even if you had the change. I often get people coming to my UK shop and asking me if I have change, when it's a £10 or £20 I will do it, after carefully scrutinising the bill. But if it's a £50 I wouldn't do it. I won't even accept a £50 note in payment for goods unless they show me ID. It's very rare they offer a £50 but when they do they won't be able to buy anything with it unless 1) they are an adult and 2) if they have ID on them. Fake £1 coins turn up all the time. They are like the 10 peso fake coins. When you get one of them as one of like 4 coins, and you look at the 4 coins in your hand, the fake one stands out a mile. But when it's just a single coin, the chances are good a vendor will just assume it is real, and pop it into the till without looking at it properly. I've taken quite a few fake £1 coins and never had any trouble spending them on. It is thought that the fake coin business accounts for quite a lot of cash floating around the UK economy, millions of pounds at any given moment. Unlike fake notes, which are not spent too many times before they are spotted and withdrawn, the fake coins keep sloshing around.

Here in the USA nobody asks for change anymore because everyone uses  plastic...Been back here in Chicago a week and have used plastic for all my spending..

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udonthani

the US $1 bill is the lowest amount of money any developed first world country uses, which is not a coin. Anything lower than 5 Euros or 5 pounds, you have to use a coin, if you are spending it in cash. Despite what you have just said, cash is obviously still used a hell of a lot in the US. Just because you are using plastic for everything right now, doesn't mean that 'everyone' does. If 'everyone' did, they wopuld abolish it there would not be any cash money in circulation at all.

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I have used just only plastic for last 15 years here in Europe. Only use paper money when visit Philippines. Check never seen in my life before Philippines. Not used for like 30 years anymore here.

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udonthani

I only take cash money in my shop and I have succeeded in going to the tropics, almost every year for the past 25 years.

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smokey

I only take cash money in my shop and I have succeeded in going to the tropics, almost every year for the past 25 years.

 

 

I only take cash money in my shop and I have succeeded in going to the tropics, almost every year for the past 25 years.

well not everyone is part of the underground  ice cream mafia 

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Canuck Joe

well not everyone is part of the underground  ice cream mafia 

hahahaha

 

sorry whippy but you have to admit that was funny.....

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Jim Sibbick

Humans don't count money in Oz Jim, it's all done with machines.

Several times at the bank and at least once, but normally twice, in the ATM.

And among other things, if the metallic thread is not sensed the fake note gets peeled off.

 

When I had all the machines in the prototype Time Zone way back in the 70s, even well made slugs in the 10 cent machines were rejected.

 

But I can accept that perhaps RP ATM machines are not quite up to date, maybe even other countries trade ins..

 

KonGC

It will soon be 10 years since I left Westpac but I am pretty sure that a lot of money is still hand counted.

 

Every time a teller was out a large amount, all the money in the branch got counted and I was regularly required to help count all the money in the branch. 

 

Counting machines can only count un banded money. After cash is received at the branch, it is all banded in groups of 10 notes then they are banded together in groups of 100 notes then they are banded together in groups of 500 notes. Much simpler to count by hand with just a few elastic bands removed.

 

All the bands get removed for the ATM machines though, then counted by a machine before it goes in the canister.

 

I have never personally seen a note counting machine that was made to detect metal threads. Of course, they are not required in Australia with plastic money which has a hologram for security.

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broden

all the money in the branch got counted and I was regularly required to help count all the money in the branch. 

 

counting large sums of cash is a filthy job just cruddy

 

 

not so bad though when it's your own

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questsea73

In the USA some cashiers use a marking pen to mark the bill to detect or try to detect if it is a counterfeit.  I noticed these pens are available to the general public in an office supply store.

 

Is such a device used in the P.I. for a similar purpose or is it all eyeball analysis?

 

Ken

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