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Filipina robbed by online scammer


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My wifes aunt had an online chatmate who said he was going to send her a gift, she got a semi official looking invoice in the mail that said she owed custom 130000 pesos for the release of the goods, listed items included a laptop, gold and diamond jewelry, gold watches and a fairly large amount of dollars.

 

I don't know if she was going to actually send the money to "customs" (she was instructed to use western union to transfer the fee) but I told her in no uncertain terms it was a scam.

 

Scammers target any and everyone, certainly not localized to the US.

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If I didn't talk to those in my wife's family who ripped us off, there wouldn't be too many to talk to.

She wasn't robbed, she gave it away. I do feel sorry for the Mother for raising such a dumbbell of a daughter, but she is equally dumb for trusting her.

Hear it often happen the other way around, this my first time to learn of this happening to Filipina, many times in Australia and other countries thou the guy has lost the lot for a girls from here.

Contango

Hear it often happen the other way around, this my first time to learn of this happening to Filipina, many times in Australia and other countries thou the guy has lost the lot for a girls from here. The revenge of the foreigner!

Filipinos getting scammed is very common, as a group of people looking to work overseas they are very vulnerable and susceptible to employment scams in particular, one girl i talked to years ago told be about getting offered a nanny job from someone in London, all that was need was for her to pay her British work visa application fee which the new boss was happy to help her with, just western union the 70 Pounds to me...etc etc.

 

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That one was not even in Nigeria, but in Malaysia, probably KL. Sending texts from Malaysian cellphones overseas, is much cheaper than it is from the Philippines, and even desperadoes like that can afford it.

Due to Malaysia's open visa system, there's a couple of thousand Ghanaian's and Nigerians living in KL trying to eke out a living any way they can, and scamming is a living for them. Edited by Contango
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udonthani

Scammers target any and everyone, certainly not localized to the US.

yes, but they may need to take it to an extra level where they gain your confidence and start texting and calling you. It may not just stay confined, to your email inbox. They can persuade somebody to get on a plane and go to wherever they are to clinch this once-in-a-lifetime business deal that is supposed to make the mark feel like they are a big shot.

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SkyMan

she withdraws the mothers 200K from the bank and wires it to Malaysia to get him out of jail. And of course- never hears from him again.

Maybe he's not out of jail yet. :paul:

 

Probably the most shocking thing about this story is that the father was able to save up p200K.

Edited by SkyMan
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The father dies and leaves 200,000 to the mother [out in the province], so the mother sends the money to the daughter who lives in Davao to put in an account for the mother.

 

The daughter who  is holding the mothers money is 53 and lives with her sister in the same  upscale subdivision  as my gf . The sister is married to a foreigner. 

 

So the daughter is online looking for a guy and meets a guy who says he is Australian - who  posts a pic of some decent looking white guy . The Ozzie tells her that he loves her and is coming to Davao and will bring a shit load of money for the 2 of them.

 

Then she gets an urgent call that he is on his way [ supposedly with all the money] but has been detained in  jail in Malaysia and needs 200K to get out.  So w/o asking the mother, or the sister, she withdraws the mothers 200K from the bank and wires it to Malaysia to get him out of jail.  And of course- never hears from him again.  

The mother visits the 2 daughters, is told about the families only monies being lost, and immediately collapses.

The sister kicks the daughter out of her house, and no one in the family will even talk to the daughter now 

 

 

I'd like to note that this has been happing to women all over the world, not only in the Philippines, in Asia I think Singapore has also been a very lucrative market for these scammers. The women trust the guy, who they supposedly think is an Australian, but who probably is a Nigerian living in Malaysia. Nigerians operate these scams on the internet, they will target anyone who they think has money, mostly females because they are men and they will call the women on the phone sometimes to create a virtual relationship that seems very genuine, although it's not. Most of the time they'll target women from rich countries such as Singapore, Japan, UK, Australia and such but often they will contact women from other countries. This has also been happening in Thailand, and it might actually be a good territory for them to target their scams on. It's their own greed and maybe desperation for love that tricks them into this, because the guy acts like he will bring alot of money with him and would probably return the money immediately. PHP 200K is still a relatively low amount of money, although it represents quite alot to most Filipinos, these scammers have tricked some women to send them well over 50,000$ in less than a few weeks after starting the virtual relationship that they probably thought would lead to love, marriage and some huge investments by the guy, but ended up being a scam.

Edited by Stone
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If she sent the money Western Union and sent it to Australia.  Then it was released to somebody in Africa, I would think that Western Union should be responsible for refunding the money.

 

The guy probably said he was travelling from Australia to Malaysia then to the Philippines as many people don't always fly directly to the country where they are going but have a stopover somewhere, so she probably sent the money to Malaysia knowing he was in Malaysia at that time when she sent the money, although she believed that he was in Australia just a few days before that.

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Headshot

The guy probably said he was travelling from Australia to Malaysia then to the Philippines as many people don't always fly directly to the country where they are going but have a stopover somewhere, so she probably sent the money to Malaysia knowing he was in Malaysia at that time when she sent the money, although she believed that he was in Australia just a few days before that.

 

What does any of that have to do with money being picked up in Africa?  :scratch_head:

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What does any of that have to do with money being picked up in Africa?

 

Having dealt with moneygram and western union for many years, when you tell the cashier where the money is going its locked into that destination, you can't send money to someone in Canada and then pick it up in Mexico without first calling the company and getting them to change it, and that has to be done by the sender at the original location with ID.

 

Maybe theres a way around that but I've had cops called on me because the original sender wouldn't come back in to talk to Moneygram so the receiver couldn't pick it up, not sure what s cam they were trying to run but the guy threatening me and calling the cops ended up getting picked up on outstanding warrants.  Not the brightest crayon in the box I guess.

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What does any of that have to do with money being picked up in Africa?  :scratch_head:

 

Oh I read that wrong, my fault. But in this case (post #1)  the scenario I described is probably spot on. She sent the money to Malaysia knowing that he was there although she thought he was in Australia before. 

Edited by Stone
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and yes you can't just send money to someone and pick it up somewhere on the other side of the world. The destination is locked to that, if she sent the money to the USA then someone in the USA should have picked it up, i'm sure some people are stupid enough to even send a Western Union payment to a scammer in Africa, but in this case the OP described that the women sent the money to Malaysia, although she thought he was an Australian, so what probably happened is that the guy told her he had a stopover in Malaysia but was put into custody so that's why she sent the money there. 

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DogHasItsDay

The most common scam where I am (U.A.E) targetting filipino's here is a text/sms saying 'you have won xxxx dollars (usually to the tune of about 1 million), recharge your phone and send the recharged amount to such and such a cell/mobile phone number in order to claim your prize, the recherged amount is in payment of processing fees. Sadly Many Many people are caught out with this scam and actually argue vehemently with you when you tell them that its a scam. So, if you know of any filipino's headding this way for a job, give them a heads up on this scam that they are all the more wiser to it before it happens to them.

 

In a nation that gives away prize's constantly, the UAE is a scammers paradise.

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Here is a video based on what is probably a true story of a Singaporean women that was cheated by one of these Nigerians for 200,000$, although this method seems to be slightly different than the one described here by the OP. In the video, the scammers pretend to be the bank who is asking them large sums of money to release a payment that is being sent to her, by the guy, who she thinks is a rich businessman who will come and visit her soon to get married and invest his money.

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Alan S

I feel sorry for anyone who has been scammed, but one of the problems with Filipinos / Filipinas is that the majority have little experience with money, and dont realise all the possible pitfalls and ways that others will try to take it from them..

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broden

cons prey on the stupid weak and or greedy

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Dragonladies.org

The West African scammers have been increasingly hitting Asian ladies for a few years.    You may be surprised at the amount of savings a FEW Asian ladies have, and lose, to these pigs.

I know of one Pinay OFW who lost $20,000 US, and talked to some middleaged chinese ladies who lost $1-10,000 US.

 

Yes, there is a serious pocket of West African scammers in Malaysia.   They get there via fake or real student visas, and occasionally get rounded up.  (Not often enough)    

 

  When the money is asked to be sent to Africa, or Malaysia, it's usually going right to the scammer, but often the West African scammers will also use 'check mules', who are people they recruit for 'work at home jobs' who will pick up the WU or Moneygram money, deposit it, keep ten percent, then forward it to the actual scammer via WU,  MG, or bank wire.   Some of these 'helpers' know what they are doing,  or figure it out, eventually, but like the income, and keep at it.

They can be anywhere, US, UK...anywhere.  They also sometimes get stuck with counterfeit checks or money orders sent by the scammer, and some get prosecuted.

 

It's funny, the story these scammers use is the fake man is a world traveler and businessman, well off, or rich, but he can't figure out how to replace a stolen or lost plane ticket, passport, or wallet,  when his plane makes an unexpected stop in goatsylvania, and needs help from a stranger.    :)

 

These scams are very easy to avoid.  The scammer can't show 'that' face on webcam, or if he can, it's a short recording he'll loop over and over or show only briefly.      (They use the same story with fake ladies, guys, so don't snicker too much)

 

With the 'traveling' romeo, it's also easy to see he is not sending the emails from the places he claims to be.

 

With this scammer from Malaysia, if the victim had checked the IP in the email headers from the first emails, when he claimed he was home in AUS, she would see the emails were coming from Malaysia.

 

No face on cam, don't talk to them.

 

If they won't email you, (which lets you check an IP) but only want to chat, use the phone, or use internal messaging on a site, dump them.  No way to verify where they are.

 

More and more nigerian scammers are sticking to modes of communication it's hard to track where they are.

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