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RogerDuMond

Raise hybrid meat goats if you have the land.

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Here is one, all ready to buy. Click Here   He thought he could come here and make a fortune, ending up losing what he had, and now has to return home to Australia. He has, quite literally, ended up

Hi Lauie,     My wife is from Leyte too and she bought her family a used Japanese surplus Isuzu 10 wheeler truck last year for hauling sugar cane from the fields in the mountains to the staging are

The expats who are successful here are VERY secretive about what they do and how they do it. Most of them export goods to the west, be it high end or cheap. They work their ASSES off and stay under th

JohnSurrey

In around about way I've been thinking about this question myself for over a year now and I'm still reluctant to put my hand in my pocket...

 

I guess what you're after is a business that would enable your family to become self-sufficient...

 

My initial thoughts were to invest in some sort of capital asset(s):

 

Property - for rental market... bedspacers or budget expat places etc - depends on your market

Laundry Equipment

Bakery Equipment

Printing Equipment

etc..

Combination - Sari2x + Small Internet Cafe + Caranderia + Some Bedspacers...

 

All of which might be profitable... it just depends on your appetite for risk - if you've plenty of cash or don't mind losing what you have - jump in.

 

I'm still sitting on the fence... and I think the major reason I'm still sitting on the fence is because some of my wife's family have enough money to fund all those businesses but they're not doing it... so I'm sort of still wondering why not - This might be pride of family shyness to be fair...

 

If I was in a position where I had plenty of revenue coming in - I might just take a chance but for the moment I'm going to sit tight.

 

The other problem foreigners have to watch is the cost of being legal - some people (usually from the mountain) are working here (leyte) for 50-100p a day plus food and board... starting at 5am and finishing at 9pm... I suspect most of us foreigners cannot compete with that because we're too conditioned to be "fair" etc...

 

The more I find out... the more reluctant I am to jump in...

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austwin

Mostly, when one starts talking about starting a business in PI, one of the first ideas that come to mind is internet cafe. But other than that, what small business would you suggest/want/wish to do in the Philippines? Why do you think it is/would be profitable? 

 

I am not sure an internet cafe would be a great move. I set up an internet cafe up around 5 years ago and it is still running till now. I never did it for personal gain but rather to help a family that I was close to and have known for many years have an income. In the the beginning it was quite a good . However as years passed it went from 4 or 5 cafes in the area to 10 plus and from 25 p per h to 10-15 p per hour. The primary recipient of the profits was a widow with 2 teen age sons, but oft times in the first couple of years there was enough funds to help her extended family as well.

Perhaps if you would like to ask her advice direct regarding internet cafe as a business I can PM you her name and email address . Actually like youself she is LDS and I am sure so she would try to advise you well.

From a personal view an internet cafe might work OK for your family for an income of sorts .....However pinoys are great coppiers in all things and if somebody will see you making an income before you know it, somebody else will set up across the road doing the same thing ..... Thats not negativity thats reality.

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Guy60417

 

Any business you start that could be in competition with locals will only bring you grief.

 

If I were starting a business here, I'd be more worried about being a big success than being a big failure. If I fail, all I would lose is my money.

 

But of course, the OP has made it clear she's looking for a business for her family, not herself. It's a great idea, using the old "if you give a man a fish ..." concept.

 

I wish I had a good proposal for you, but it seems to me the best bet might be to talk your sister out of nursing school. From all I hear/read/observe that's really a dead-end profession in this country.

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austwin

I wish I had a good proposal for you, but it seems to me the best bet might be to talk your sister out of nursing school. From all I hear/read/observe that's really a dead-end profession in this country.

 

Nursing is not great for within the P i ...but thats the case with most gradute courses there... However if they can Luck it to get out and get into a non third world country they can do well... I know many here in my home city in OZ that have come out here as nurses ......They did have to study again here and it was expensive. But they made their great escape via their nusing profession.

In fact I have a filipina nusing student here sharing in my home ..... $6,500.oo per semester so it is a tough slog... but doooABLE if your driven to succeed. 

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Jawny

I am not a business man in the sense of having a skill set for setting up and operating a business.  However, we have had a successful bakery business for several years.  By successful, I measure that by the number of people who are employed and the fact that the weekly balance sheet usually ends up in the black. 

 

We have a provincial bakery with six bakers and three helpers along with a part time manager/supervisor.  We spend no time in the bakery ourselves.

 

The problem for any local is the same as for us.  Initial capital was needed for the equipment, supplies and location.  As well, there are various inspections and licenses needed to be sure the bakery doesn't become successful only to be shut down due to some red tape.  Crab mentality is live and well here.

 

During the years of operation, there has been a return of profits to more equipment and building improvements.  Added back up generators, extra machinery and such as that is a luxury many here can't manage.

 

There were employment rules set up.  Not strict, but clear.  If you quit, the job is passed along to another.  If you fail to give notice of absences many times, you are dismissed.  No debts, no pay advances.  All sales are cash only, no debt....this is bread, not rice!

 

Workers get periodic bonuses as wages.  End of year bonuses are generous, including parties, hams, tshirts that sort of stuff. 

 

The real money is made by the sellers who work on a 20% commission, much higher than any nearby competitors.  The sellers are included in the end of year bonuses.  

 

We have had very little turn over in staff.  Some sleep in small rooms we have nearby and return for time with their families on weekends and when work is slow.

 

This sort of devotion to the work has helped us succeed.

 

A small bakery opened near us around a year ago.  There was an open spirit of competition, but it bordered on nastiness when they tried steal some regular customers (some who buy large quantities).  We never deviated from our straight forward business practices and remained unaffected by the new bakery.  Unfortunately for them, starting with little capital has created strains on their ability to deliver on time.  They started giving their sellers 25% plus some of the day old bread.  This changed to 20%, then 15% and now is 10%.  We know this since these same delivery guys want to buy our bread and sell it and pass along their tales.

 

So, a bakery is doable, at least in the province.

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Guy60417

Nursing is not great for within the P i ...but thats the case with most gradute courses there... However if they can Luck it to get out and get into a non third world country they can do well...

 

Yeah, I did think about nursing as a means to get out of the country -- which might very well be what the sister is planning to do. Though I don't think that's as good an escape hatch as it used to be, at least as far as the US is concerned.

 

In any case, it seemed the OP was looking for an in-country solution.

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asiawolfie

Sadly I would say that the Phils are the worst of all places where a foreigner can be successful with a business, even worse than Thailand....

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DogHasItsDay

Nursing is not great for within the P i ...but thats the case with most gradute courses there... However if they can Luck it to get out and get into a non third world country they can do well... I know many here in my home city in OZ that have come out here as nurses ......They did have to study again here and it was expensive. But they made their great escape via their nusing profession.

In fact I have a filipina nusing student here sharing in my home ..... $6,500.oo per semester so it is a tough slog... but doooABLE if your driven to succeed. 

 

 

If I were starting a business here, I'd be more worried about being a big success than being a big failure. If I fail, all I would lose is my money.

 

But of course, the OP has made it clear she's looking for a business for her family, not herself. It's a great idea, using the old "if you give a man a fish ..." concept.

 

I wish I had a good proposal for you, but it seems to me the best bet might be to talk your sister out of nursing school. From all I hear/read/observe that's really a dead-end profession in this country.

 

Agreed, if they make it out to a different country, the UAE is full of Filipina nurses that do a damn fine job

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alexccms

I think the U.S. demand for nurses is going to bounce back over the next 3-5 years.  Just how old are baby boomers anyway?  They start hitting the nuring homes in large numbers and we'll be hiring again.  The challenge for todays students is to pass their licensure exams and maintain their skills during the hiring slump.

 

 

I've always understood that if you get a Filipino/a or family started in a business what happens is they see the total amount of money taken in during a day or week as their take home pay.  Without business training how are they to know how much needs to be saved to replenish the shelves, get the oil changed, buy new tires, etc.  So what happens is the person who got them started in the business becomes responsible for keeping them in business.  That is, you'll be stocking the SariSari or paying for the jeepney repairs.  That's why it's sometimes better just to send them the money.  

 

Good luck to you tough.

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Mostly, when one starts talking about starting a business in PI, one of the first ideas that come to mind is internet cafe. But other than that, what small business would you suggest/want/wish to do in the Philippines? Why do you think it is/would be profitable? 

 

I have found a business concept that requires minimal investment and work but can provide millions in profits monthly.

I also sold the concept to 5 people and they are happy, it's actually no problem if we are many who are doing this here in the Philippines.

 

 

The concept I have called:

 

 

 

 

PLU2

 

 

or

 

 

 

 

Play LOTTO U2

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alexccms

what about a boarding house,

for single ladies ;)

 

I've always liked that idea... but my wife doesn't seem to keen on it.

 

Talk about eating the profits!

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smokey

one of the new business to be in i think will be CARE HOME ASSISTED... cost in the us for such a place is at the low end 2,000 a month and the high 4,500 a month...  THE trick and it would take some work is to get the insurance companies to accept and pay say 1,200 a month for the same care in the Philippines,,, that would open a huge market from japan , usa , etc etc etc many would come to the Philippines but they are stuck in their countries because insurance pays the fee  ,,, Now its possible to get a self pay program but i am sure it will be for the most part Fil am who had no insurance and self pay in cebu is a lot better then self pay in the usa 

 

 

for those thinking of nursing this year the usa gave out 80,000 B type working visa units they were snapped up in days .... Also the cost of the host is getting higher and higher its time to stop thinking of ways to escape the Philippines to offering a service that is needed and lower cost  just like call centers are in cebu ??????    save money so its a great business model for the person who spearheads the assisted living care home then they franchise it like a jolly be 

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mikejwoodnz

one of the new business to be in i think will be CARE HOME ASSISTED... cost in the us for such a place is at the low end 2,000 a month and the high 4,500 a month...  THE trick and it would take some work is to get the insurance companies to accept and pay say 1,200 a month for the same care in the Philippines,,, that would open a huge market from japan , usa , etc etc etc many would come to the Philippines but they are stuck in their countries because insurance pays the fee  ,,, Now its possible to get a self pay program but i am sure it will be for the most part Fil am who had no insurance and self pay in cebu is a lot better then self pay in the usa 

 

 

for those thinking of nursing this year the usa gave out 80,000 B type working visa units they were snapped up in days .... Also the cost of the host is getting higher and higher its time to stop thinking of ways to escape the Philippines to offering a service that is needed and lower cost  just like call centers are in cebu ??????    save money so its a great business model for the person who spearheads the assisted living care home then they franchise it like a jolly be 

 

Better yet buy a row of Decca houses, fit them out and employ for each a live-in husband & wife as caregivers/housekeepers then lease each unit to a retired kano who then has benefit of serviced home. Set up a "boss" house in the middle of each row and employ a supervisor for each row. The Kano can get retired residency and his "security' can be reinvested in more rows of Decca style housing for the retired - many cash rich retired to market offshore to - multi national. PM if interested.

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