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sjp

Free Hot Water

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sjp

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Woolf

Free hot water ??  

That depends how much you have to pay for the wood that you burn

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sjp

compare it to using electricity and it will feel like it is free. The poor in the Philippines only use wood to cook so its very cheap and sometimes free

Edited by sjp
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jtmwatchbiz

compare it to using electricity and it will feel like it is free. The poor in the Philippines only use wood to cook so its very cheap and sometimes free

 

 

good point, but most locals here don't want or need hot water :)

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KID

http://www.motherearthnews.com/

 

check this site out for your "Off the Grid" info needs----- its a great magazine and has been around forever !!

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udonthani

compare it to using electricity and it will feel like it is free. The poor in the Philippines only use wood to cook so its very cheap and sometimes free

wood is not that cheap to buy. I guess it varies around the country but it's 20 pesos per kilo in Lanao del Norte and a kilo only lasts a family one day. May not seem like a lot to rich foreigners, but to them it's like an hours earnings to buy a kilo of firewood. In other words it's like an American spending about eight dollars a day i.e. the minimum wage, on fuel just for cooking their meals.

Edited by udonthani

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Ozepete

I hope this 'engineer' guy has a good insurance policy and health cover!!  :scratch_head:

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broden

if you move next door to a pre-existing tire fire you can do this totally for free

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SkyMan

wood is not that cheap to buy. I guess it varies around the country but it's 20 pesos per kilo in Lanao del Norte and a kilo only lasts a family one day. May not seem like a lot to rich foreigners, but to them it's like an hours earnings to buy a kilo of firewood. In other words it's like an American spending about eight dollars a day i.e. the minimum wage, on fuel just for cooking their meals.

One of bundles of dried sticks is about p6 and about a kilo.

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Paul

http://www.motherearthnews.com/

 

check this site out for your "Off the Grid" info needs----- its a great magazine and has been around forever !!

 

I have a Mother Earth RSS  feed importing news into threads on the Cambodia forum.

http://www.livingincambodiaforums.com/ipb/forum/51-self-sustainable-resources/

 

 

Free hot water ??  

That depends how much you have to pay for the wood that you burn

 

During the time I lived in provincial Cebu, Vivian's family paid for very little wood.

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USMC-Retired

Wow the cheapness people will go to.  just plug the water heater in and use it.   Wood is a pain in the ass and starting a fire to take a hot shower.  Rather just take it cold.  But hey if you live with a ton of wood around go for it

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udonthani

as stated few Filipinos even want a hot shower anyway. The big majority of girls do not take a hot shower when there is a choice. You can tell this when you use the bathroom after they do, as it is still set to cold. Or they try it hot like one time, don't like it, and switch back to cold.

 

some of them do realise that it is better to heat water to do laundry by hand once you have shown them how easy it can be. One realised that the element I had to heat a bucket of water up very quickly to handwash clothes was a good thing to have and used it.

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Runian

minimum investment cheap hot water device for the tropics that I used for shower water last year 

 

Garden_hose.jpg

 

 

Step one : connect to water source 

 

step two : coil it up on your lawn 

 

step tree : attach a fancy end thingy with shower function 

 

step Four : open water source

 

step five : have a 5 minute brake from all the work, undress and shower. ( do not take too long a brake cos the water will become scolding hot ) 

 

A 60 feet length of garden hose will give u a modest shower 120 feet will make u think u had a water heater on...

 

I advice u to turn off the source tap and let the presure out of the hose when don to increase hose life span 

 

Your welcome 

Rune :) 

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miles-high

Just connect/weld pipes or tanks and paint them black, after the installation, the hot water is completely free, nada… It’s so easy to DIY… :) and… needless to add, it’s always sunny here (well, almost ;))


http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=solar+water+heater&qpvt=solar+water+heater&FORM=IGRE



 

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sjp

as stated few Filipinos even want a hot shower anyway. The big majority of girls do not take a hot shower when there is a choice. You can tell this when you use the bathroom after they do, as it is still set to cold. Or they try it hot like one time, don't like it, and switch back to cold.

 

some of them do realise that it is better to heat water to do laundry by hand once you have shown them how easy it can be. One realised that the element I had to heat a bucket of water up very quickly to handwash clothes was a good thing to have and used it.

Well I take a different view. When I installed a hot water heater for my wifes family ( 34 people ) every one of them loved it. The only person that did not like it was me, I pay the electric bill.

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