Jump to content

Omni 3-way Switch Wiring Diagram.


Recommended Posts

Greetings! Here is your edited picture. How did you upload it with only 14 post?

I had to have 50 before I could post pictures.

 

attachicon.gifcorection1.png

 

I have done it simply with 'COPY' and 'CTRL V''

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 51
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • RogerDat

    7

  • Headshot

    7

  • Woolf

    6

  • GoHuk

    5

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Brilliant example of how to go off-topic in two posts. It can't be done any faster than that. 

Greetings! Forums are ment to be a place to have a casual conversation between intrested members discusing what we are doing with our time, and are not allways toeing the party line. Cave men, flying

Greetings! The "KEY" is "Three-ways are fairly easy to implement provided you have the right switches and you can follow the diagram." That is why I posted the diagram. Yes I do have dry wall, with

Posted Images

SkyMan

Greetings! Here is your edited picture. How did you upload it with only 14 post?

I had to have 50 before I could post pictures.

 

attachicon.gifcorection1.png

Except, and I may be wrong, that the X on the light in the diagram signifies the light is off in which case the original was correct.  If that's not the way explanation then I believe that since no numbers were used in the diagram, the switches were drawn as mirrors of each other to keep from crossing the wires and making the schematic neater. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

Truthfully, it doesn't matter which terminal is hooked to which (between terminal 1 and terminal 3 on the two switches). Either way will work as long as you don't hook either end of one of these wires to terminal 0 on either switch. It has to be either 1 to 1 and 3 to 3 or 1 to 3 and 3 to 1. One terminal 0 gets hooked to the source and the other terminal 0 gets hooked to the light(s). Neither switch is grounded (only the light fixture is).

Edited by Headshot
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

phooey.  by now i was hoping for at least a little discussion of giggling girls.

 

all this reminds me of the house i grew up in.  we had a switch at the top and bottom of the stairs and a third switch at the end of the upstairs hall, all meant to contol the upstairs hall lights.  during construction my dad specified a three way switch setup because he figured there were 3 switches.  of course, it should have been a 4 way setup, and ever since it has been a case where one of the 3 switches (typically the one nearest you) won't work at a given time because of the positions of the other 2 switches.  over 50 years now of people muttering "good job dad!". 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

if you want more than two switches the easiest thing  to do is install a push button which go to a relay in your circuit board

 

i also dont think it matters which way round you intsall the cables that run bewteen the two switches.

 

ive installed loads of them but nver paid attntion to them

Link to post
Share on other sites

For the PH they are all a little messed up since any leakage to ground can cause the light to flicker when off. To do it "right" one would need to either have a US style circuit with a grounded current carrying neutral (which goes to the fixture as shown in the German diagram) or use double pole switching or something. 

 

This PH thing of using US style switches designed for use in grounded neutral systems in a floating system is unsafe and unreliable. 

Edited by Cipro
Link to post
Share on other sites

if you want more than two switches the easiest thing  to do is install a push button which go to a relay in your circuit board

 

i also dont think it matters which way round you intsall the cables that run bewteen the two switches.

 

ive installed loads of them but nver paid attntion to them

 

I use 2-way (I'm British) crossover switches for introducing more than twp switches in the run.  They're hard to find here in the PH especially as hardware store salesmen seem to make up their own terminology.  Actually I'm surprised Omni bother to make a three-terminal version since a crossover (four-terminal) switch may be used instead as long as you jump the supply/feed across two terminals.

 

They way the cables are installed between intermediate switches matters not.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For the PH they are all a little messed up since any leakage to ground can cause the light to flicker when off. To do it "right" one would need to either have a US style circuit with a grounded current carrying neutral (which goes to the fixture as shown in the German diagram) or use double pole switching or something. 

 

This PH thing of using US style switches designed for use in grounded neutral systems in a floating system is unsafe and unreliable. 

 

Yes! using single pole switches in a split phase (dual phase) system will turn off the light but remember

that you still have one hot (110/120 v) at the lamp fixture.

Whenever working on any electrical wiring in PH make sure to turn off the circuit breaker at the distribution panel.

 

What do you mean by "floating system" ?

Link to post
Share on other sites
SkyMan

all this reminds me of the house i grew up in. we had a switch at the top and bottom of the stairs and a third switch at the end of the upstairs hall, all meant to contol the upstairs hall lights. during construction my dad specified a three way switch setup because he figured there were 3 switches. of course, it should have been a 4 way setup, and ever since it has been a case where one of the 3 switches (typically the one nearest you) won't work at a given time because of the positions of the other 2 switches. over 50 years now of people muttering "good job dad!".

I think within 50 years (actually within 6 months) of hearing that I'd have rewired it even if that meant fishing another conductor through the wall.  I was getting a tour of the last house I bought in the US from previous owner and I noticed no GFI socket in the master bath that had a double sink with outlets on both sides.  He said, "Yeah, it's in the basement." "Huh?"  We went down the two flights of stairs to the basement and there on the wall was a GFI outlet.  He said If there was a short in the MB upstairs it trips down here.  Then he said, "It took me a long tim eto figure that one out."  Which meant it had been that way the whole time he'd lived there.  I asked him, "You've lived here how long and haven't just taken it out and put it upstairs?.  I think he'd lived there 15 years and the wildest thing, he worked as a HS shop teacher.

Edited by SkyMan
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

For the PH they are all a little messed up since any leakage to ground can cause the light to flicker when off. To do it "right" one would need to either have a US style circuit with a grounded current carrying neutral (which goes to the fixture as shown in the German diagram) or use double pole switching or something. 

 

This PH thing of using US style switches designed for use in grounded neutral systems in a floating system is unsafe and unreliable. 

 

Yes! using single pole switches in a split phase (dual phase) system will turn off the light but remember

that you still have one hot (110/120 v) at the lamp fixture.

Whenever working on any electrical wiring in PH make sure to turn off the circuit breaker at the distribution panel.

 

What do you mean by "floating system" ?

No grounded current carrying conductors. AKA no neutral. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Thelandofku-an

Clarification:

UK calls "switch ways" by their function (one way, two way, three way).

Philippines calls "switch ways" by the number of terminals on the switch (respectively two way, three way, four way).

Link to post
Share on other sites
Thelandofku-an

 

 

 

For the PH they are all a little messed up since any leakage to ground can cause the light to flicker when off. To do it "right" one would need to either have a US style circuit with a grounded current carrying neutral (which goes to the fixture as shown in the German diagram) or use double pole switching or something. 

 

This PH thing of using US style switches designed for use in grounded neutral systems in a floating system is unsafe and unreliable. 

 

 

Yes! using single pole switches in a split phase (dual phase) system will turn off the light but remember

that you still have one hot (110/120 v) at the lamp fixture.

Whenever working on any electrical wiring in PH make sure to turn off the circuit breaker at the distribution panel.

 

What do you mean by "floating system" ?

No grounded current carrying conductors. AKA no neutral. 

Have you noticed that many "neutrals" have been purposely grounded by the provider on the consumer side of the meter during installation?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Thelandofku-an

For those requiring more than two switches in a lighting circuit

A three terminal switch is required at each end of the switching circuit, almost any number of four terminal switches can be installed to the common pair of wires between them, they are simply crossing over the common pair to complete the circuit.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I think within 50 years (actually within 6 months) of hearing that I'd have rewired it even if that meant fishing another conductor through the wall.

 

well, given my dad's expertise (which i seem to have inherited) i think it was quietly agreed that the inconvenience was more tolerable than having some faulty wiring burn the house down or something.  and hiring a knowledgeable person to do it would be sort of like stopping to ask for directions when lost...  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..