Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Stranded Shipscook

The vast Majority of expat Children become expats themselves !

Recommended Posts

Stranded Shipscook

Thsi isalso anobservation i have made opver the past decades. The kids of the expats become expats themselves. Now there was a study by St.John's Schools which manifested my observation/suspicion.

 

I like this blog also for some of its (highlighted by me) contents. This is also what is all about. 

 

http://blog.stjohns.be/2013/01/09/expat-children-become-expats-themselves-as-adults-poll-shows/?goback=.gde_1056387_member_202730821

 

A recent poll conducted by St. John’s among adults who grew up as expat children shows that the large majority of them actually become expats themselves.

Despite the transient nature of expat life and the associated difficulties for children, the poll shows that 46.2% of respondents have themselves become an expat, that 11.5% of expat children married an expat, while 38.5% are looking to become an expat in the future.

As one expat put it: “The life of an expat kid is the life I would like to provide to my future children. I loved the lifestyle, learning about different cultures, meeting lovely people, and growing up with the best experiences in life.”

Most expat kids are third culture kids (TCK): kids who build relationships to several cultures while not having full ownership of any. It is often assumed that these kids would be looking for a sense of belonging and a fixed location to call home as adults. However, only 9.6% made a conscious decision not to become an expat. One of the respondents explains “Growing up is hard enough without moving around.”

The results of this poll show that the benefits of expat life seem to far outweigh the challenges: “I think it is an incredible experience in life and I would want my children to have the same opportunity to soak in culture, diversity and travel.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A_Simple_Man
“I think it is an incredible experience in life and I would want my children to have the same opportunity to soak in culture, diversity and travel.”

I agree but, to me, that's stating the obvious so it must have been a slow news day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
spooks

I am a child of an expat in armed forces which is why i probably appreciate the expat life and the cultural experiences.  I was only discussing yesterday with the asawa about home tuition for them both up to age 7 then looking at something more suited to schooling in terms of location. In the meantime take them both on an incredible journey.  So 'on the road tuition' in the 3 Rs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For Real

Expats have more options and are far less afraid to use them. I have a predisposition to limit the changes in children's enviornment but a lot of expat parent friends think differently. Even teenagers i know can easily adapt back to the home country easier than adults.

 

Is the reverse true when adult expats agree to a 2 year posting but stay for 16+ years   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

I grew up an Air Force brat, so most of my friends spent time overseas at some point while they were growing up (I suppose that would make them expat children), but I only know of one other than myself that became an expat as an adult. Even most of those who went into the military after high school didn't end up overseas any more than they were required to. Maybe this study is talking more about kids who spend most of their childhood overseas (which military brats seldom do). Military dependents (at least when I was growing up) could expect to be overseas from three to five years of their childhood (although none of us knew it at the time). It's a lot less now because there aren't nearly as many overseas bases anymore. I suppose if you spent the majority of your childhood overseas, and your family moved around between countries in the process, it would change your outlook dramatically.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
spooks

we were moving every two/three years

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
broden

maybe it's just cause most expats kids want to get as far away from their weird parents as possible

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

we were moving every two/three years

So did we...but it was mostly inside the US.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tomaw

I would think the civilian expat kids that stay put in a forign country would have a much different experience than the kids in militay familys that are constantly moving around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
spooks

I would think the civilian expat kids that stay put in a forign country would have a much different experience than the kids in militay familys that are constantly moving around.

Not sure why. expats on civilian terms are usually contracted 2/3 years, similar to military tours etc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stranded Shipscook

I wiould guess the main differences of Civilian Families and Military families is that the latter (when there are larger bases as in the Philippines,Japan,Korea,Gemany etc. ) are usually living in a kind military communities with schools, housing, shops etc. provided by the Nation of Origin. So the contacts and social surrounding is primary with their "own" nationals.

 

While civilian families are more mingling with the locals. It may be that the company pays the bills, but the choice of school, house etc. is up to them.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

I wiould guess the main differences of Civilian Families and Military families is that the latter (when there are larger bases as in the Philippines,Japan,Korea,Gemany etc. ) are usually living in a kind military communities with schools, housing, shops etc. provided by the Nation of Origin. So the contacts and social surrounding is primary with their "own" nationals.

 

While civilian families are more mingling with the locals. It may be that the company pays the bills, but the choice of school, house etc. is up to them.

Not necessarily. I don't know of a single US military base in the world where there is enough housing on-base for all of the families. So...while a lot of the kids will experience what you described, others will be immersed in the local culture just like the kids of civilians. The US military pays for it either way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
broden

 

I wiould guess the main differences of Civilian Families and Military families is that the latter (when there are larger bases as in the Philippines,Japan,Korea,Gemany etc. ) are usually living in a kind military communities with schools, housing, shops etc. provided by the Nation of Origin. So the contacts and social surrounding is primary with their "own" nationals.

 

While civilian families are more mingling with the locals. It may be that the company pays the bills, but the choice of school, house etc. is up to them.

Not necessarily. I don't know of a single US military base in the world where there is enough housing on-base for all of the families. So...while a lot of the kids will experience what you described, others will be immersed in the local culture just like the kids of civilians. The US military pays for it either way.

yeah most of the subdivisions around here have a large percentage of military families and every single one of them uses their closeness to one or move of the bases here as a selling point

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tomaw

I wiould guess the main differences of Civilian Families and Military families is that the latter (when there are larger bases as in the Philippines,Japan,Korea,Gemany etc. ) are usually living in a kind military communities with schools, housing, shops etc. provided by the Nation of Origin. So the contacts and social surrounding is primary with their "own" nationals.

 

While civilian families are more mingling with the locals. It may be that the company pays the bills, but the choice of school, house etc. is up to them.

.......... Thanks,that's what I thought.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..