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Is this true, new requirements for 13a visa


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Yeah, you soft spoken guys never get anything done.

Its amazing how naturally foreigners in the Philippines talk about getting deported - as if it were a sword constantly hanging over each and every foreigners head - ready to be used for the slightest

When u initially apply for your 13 a visa the requirement are for Home police clearance, valid for 6 months from date of issue. used for the permanent visa range including SRRV. Nothing new here. Once

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A_Simple_Man

 

i have written to manila when i get an answer i will post

 

So you're saying you don't believe James?  Or you think he does not know how to ask the questions right?  Or who to ask?  I figured he already got the answers but I'm sure we will all be completely satisfied once you do it.

 

 

 

They specifically stated I needed a authenticated FBI background check.

 

 

So they singled you out?  Or did they specifically state that everyone needs it?  Or just Americans?  Still clear as mud.

OK I will type slower just for you... :biggrin_01:  They stated that all those who are now applying for a 13a Visa will be required to include a national background check from their home country. In the USA that is a FBI background check. The Davao Immigration officer told me they needed a FBI background check from me. This I did question as I do not know of another US law enforcement agency that performs a national level background checks on request of US citizens? To the best of my knowledge I do not think the US FBI does national background checks for citizens of other countries, but somehow I doubt it. I would assume most countries have their own version of the FBI to assist them in obtaining this document.

 

The Davao Immigration officer did give us this number in case we had any further questions 826-8263.

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i have written to manila when i get an answer i will post

 

So you're saying you don't believe James?  Or you think he does not know how to ask the questions right?  Or who to ask?  I figured he already got the answers but I'm sure we will all be completely satisfied once you do it.

 

>> 

 

They specifically stated I needed a authenticated FBI background check.

 

 

So they singled you out?  Or did they specifically state that everyone needs it?  Or just Americans?  Still clear as mud.

OK I will type slower just for you... :biggrin_01:  They stated that all those who are now applying for a 13a Visa will be required to include a national background check from their home country. In the USA that is a FBI background check. The Davao Immigration officer told me they needed a FBI background check from me. This I did question as I do not know of another US law enforcement agency that performs a national level background checks on request of US citizens? To the best of my knowledge I do not think the US FBI does national background checks for citizens of other countries, but somehow I doubt it. I would assume most countries have their own version of the FBI to assist them in obtaining this document.

 

The Davao Immigration officer did give us this number in case we had any further questions 826-8263.

 

Mr simple, like James did for another member, i will type this ever so slow just for you, Lynyard skynyard thumping ur personal anthem out in the back ground, just to make sure you feel at home.  There was more than just the issue of national police clearance which was also covered alongside sanity tests etc. There was also the suggestion that ALL previous OR need to be presented.The last one is not yet covered with any certainty, unless of course you are certain it has been. :db::itsokay:

 

My aim is to to bring complete satisfaction as already identified by you. :db:

 

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trthebees

Receipts from previous years annual check in. Was told their was an announcement from the BOI about it last week.

  Cheers for the note, and as I'll do mine in the next day or two I'll take last years receipt...the only one I can find.

 

Looking at the BOI site, they say ACR-1 and Certificate of Residence. I've never had one, and don't know what it is, and never been asked for it. Does anyone know?

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Monsoon

Well guys I did a bit of checking. They are requiring a national police clearance from the applicant's home country now for the 13A. This should be no surprise or big deal as its required by nearly any country for almost any kind of working or residency visa. In fact, it was required of everyone who did their 13A from their home country for some time now. I have no problem with the background check requirement - my problem is how to jump through the right hoops for them, and hopefully they don't request something that is impossible to fulfill. For example - the Philippine marriage law requires a "Legal capacity to marry" document from the foreign grooms home country. Well, guess what, my country (USA) does not issue such a document. Why? Because they have no national marriage register in America. So anyway, the American embassy issues an affidavit in lieu of Legal Capacity or Marry or something like that. Well guess what? There are municipalities in the Philippines that will not accept this document! So, the big concern here for me, as should be for all Americans (and possibly for other nationalities) is - How exactly do we tick the box?

 

So during my research on getting an FBI background check (which isnt a background check) while living abroad I stumbled across English teachers living in Korea who have been given the same requirement recently. Some of them are saying it takes 3 months to get it. Then they have to have it apostilled. In some cases, notorized first and then apostilled.

 

For Americans,  how do you pass an FBI background check? Well, this is not an FBI background check at all. I've been through an FBI background check, that requires special agents visiting your house, the school you went to, meet with people you grew up with, teachers, classmates, neighbors, past employers etc. and far more complicated and beyond the scope of what this document does.

 

This is simply a request for your FBI criminal file. The FBI only issues a report of what they have on file. This is based on the fingerprints they have on file for you in NICS as a result of an AFIS search. If you've never been arrested for anything, never been in the military or had a job or license that required fingerprint background checks, then you won't have a record in AFIS and unless you have been the subject of any FBI investigation, you will have no FBI file at all. In that case it will return "No record". If you have at any time had your fingerprints taken and submitted to the FBI when your card is run, it will produce a hit or hits. The clerk at the FBI will then review the purpose of those hits and if it is not for criminal conviction then you will receive a report that says "No criminal record -FBI".

 

If you got for example arrested for drunk driving 10 years ago, and assuming the cop who booked you did a good job taking your prints, you will have a hit in the system, and it will report that when you request your FBI file.

 

FYI - Some of the English teachers I read about were talking about being deported from their 5 year teaching job for a 10 year old drunk driving case.

 

How to tick the box - that's question here. And I assure you there will be thread after thread about this one. Lets hope they don't ask us to put a round peg in a square hole.

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JamesMusslewhite

i have written to manila when i get an answer i will post

I am writing the main office of the Philippine Immigration office in Manila to see if these new requirements also are required for the 13b,13c,13d,13e,13f, and 13g Visas as well I will post if they ever give a response... I will file a 13g instead of the 13a because my wife is a naturalized US citizen who has repatriated and is now a duel citizen. The 13q does not have the 1 year probationary period. One approved it is a 5 year visa. Somehow I have the feeling these new rules will be required for most if not all resident Visa. Work visas, and retirement Visas.

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i have written to manila when i get an answer i will post

I am writing the main office of the Philippine Immigration office in Manila to see if these new requirements also are required for the 13b,13c,13d,13e,13f, and 13g Visas as well I will post if they ever give a response... I will file a 13g instead of the 13a because my wife is a naturalized US citizen who has repatriated and is now a duel citizen. The 13q does not have the 1 year probationary period. One approved it is a 5 year visa. Somehow I have the feeling these new rules will be required for most if not all resident Visa. Work visas, and retirement Visas.

Retirement visa is already well covered and is enforced, well it was many years ago when I applied for it and was accepted.  The problem is that they do not; 'grandfather' a conversion from that permanent resident visa to the 13a permanent resident visa, it is treated as an entirely new process

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i have written to manila when i get an answer i will post

I am writing the main office of the Philippine Immigration office in Manila to see if these new requirements also are required for the 13b,13c,13d,13e,13f, and 13g Visas as well I will post if they ever give a response... I will file a 13g instead of the 13a because my wife is a naturalized US citizen who has repatriated and is now a duel citizen. The 13q does not have the 1 year probationary period. One approved it is a 5 year visa. Somehow I have the feeling these new rules will be required for most if not all resident Visa. Work visas, and retirement Visas.

 

You need to check it out again. Once you have been granted the permanent 13A visa, it is NOT a five-year visa as you state. It is a permanent visa. It is only the ACR-I card that has to be updated every five years. The visa is good until you either don't participate in the annual report (for whatever reason) or they deport you for other reasons. I think you are missing the concept here. The temporary visa that you get at first is NOT the same as the permanent visa.

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Davaoeno

 

The visa is good until you either don't participate in the annual report (for whatever reason) or they deport you for other reasons

 

 

Its amazing how naturally foreigners in the Philippines talk about getting deported - as if it were a sword constantly hanging over each and every foreigners head - ready to be used for the slightest reason .!!  Wife's family wants your house ?  wife gets upset at you ? someone owes you money and doesnt want to pay ?  your pinoy business partner wants to take over the whole business ?  you upset some arrogant connected local ?

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JamesMusslewhite

 

 

i have written to manila when i get an answer i will post

I am writing the main office of the Philippine Immigration office in Manila to see if these new requirements also are required for the 13b,13c,13d,13e,13f, and 13g Visas as well I will post if they ever give a response... I will file a 13g instead of the 13a because my wife is a naturalized US citizen who has repatriated and is now a duel citizen. The 13q does not have the 1 year probationary period. One approved it is a 5 year visa. Somehow I have the feeling these new rules will be required for most if not all resident Visa. Work visas, and retirement Visas.

 

You need to check it out again. Once you have been granted the permanent 13A visa, it is NOT a five-year visa as you state. It is a permanent visa. It is only the ACR-I card that has to be updated every five years. The visa is good until you either don't participate in the annual report (for whatever reason) or they deport you for other reasons. I think you are missing the concept here. The temporary visa that you get at first is NOT the same as the permanent visa.

Then let me stand corrected. When applying for their 13a Visa there is first the issuing of the probationary 1 year ACR-I card, and then after the required reapplication process 1 year later you are then issued the 5 year ACR-I card. But when one is filing a 13g, you are simply issued the 5 year ACR-I card as there is no probational 1 year reapplication requirement.

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SkyMan

Monsoon, on 25 Jan 2013 - 03:41, said:

This is simply a request for your FBI criminal file. The FBI only issues a report of what they have on file. This is based on the fingerprints they have on file for you in NICS as a result of an AFIS search. If you've never been arrested for anything, never been in the military or had a job or license that required fingerprint background checks, then you won't have a record in AFIS and unless you have been the subject of any FBI investigation, you will have no FBI file at all. In that case it will return "No record". If you have at any time had your fingerprints taken and submitted to the FBI when your card is run, it will produce a hit or hits. The clerk at the FBI will then review the purpose of those hits and if it is not for criminal conviction then you will receive a report that says "No criminal record -FBI".

Interesting. Any idea what the cost is for this? (Looks like $18) Might be interesting to see what they have on me.

 

And yes, some countries are extremely strict on DUIs and other crimes. Some have a permanent ban on driving for any DUI offense anywhere. And apparently some consider a DUI at any time anywhere a deportable offense.

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Monsoon

Monsoon, on 25 Jan 2013 - 03:41, said:

This is simply a request for your FBI criminal file. The FBI only issues a report of what they have on file. This is based on the fingerprints they have on file for you in NICS as a result of an AFIS search. If you've never been arrested for anything, never been in the military or had a job or license that required fingerprint background checks, then you won't have a record in AFIS and unless you have been the subject of any FBI investigation, you will have no FBI file at all. In that case it will return "No record". If you have at any time had your fingerprints taken and submitted to the FBI when your card is run, it will produce a hit or hits. The clerk at the FBI will then review the purpose of those hits and if it is not for criminal conviction then you will receive a report that says "No criminal record -FBI".

Interesting. Any idea what the cost is for this? (Looks like $18) Might be interesting to see what they have on me.

And yes, some countries are extremely strict on DUIs and other crimes. Some have a permanent ban on driving for any DUI offense anywhere. And apparently some consider a DUI at any time anywhere a deportable offense.

Plus the cost of you getting it authenticated by the Philippine consulate, plus getting it in your hands to give to immigration.

 

Yes, its actually cause to deny you entry to Canada as well, even for a weekend visit or a 2 hour meeting. Have a friend who has a lake house in Canada and caused him a big problem after he got a DUI years ago. Couldn't go to his vacation house.

 

It should be noted that you won't get all the information that they can see on their end. You'll only get feedback on criminal stuff. A complex background check would also include every single instance where police have contact with you and run your name through NCIC. Every time they do so a record is stored as to what agency did the check and they have coding to give reasons. But that info is only available to LE. For example I remember being interviewed and they asked me, "You were interviewed by such and such police department on such and such date. What for?" I had to think for a while and then was like, "Oh yea, the only time I've ever been there was to get a handgun purchase permit." Bingo.

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i have written to manila when i get an answer i will post

I am writing the main office of the Philippine Immigration office in Manila to see if these new requirements also are required for the 13b,13c,13d,13e,13f, and 13g Visas as well I will post if they ever give a response... I will file a 13g instead of the 13a because my wife is a naturalized US citizen who has repatriated and is now a duel citizen. The 13q does not have the 1 year probationary period. One approved it is a 5 year visa. Somehow I have the feeling these new rules will be required for most if not all resident Visa. Work visas, and retirement Visas.

 

You need to check it out again. Once you have been granted the permanent 13A visa, it is NOT a five-year visa as you state. It is a permanent visa. It is only the ACR-I card that has to be updated every five years. The visa is good until you either don't participate in the annual report (for whatever reason) or they deport you for other reasons. I think you are missing the concept here. The temporary visa that you get at first is NOT the same as the permanent visa.

Then let me stand corrected. When applying for their 13a Visa there is first the issuing of the probationary 1 year ACR-I card, and then after the required reapplication process 1 year later you are then issued the 5 year ACR-I card. But when one is filing a 13g, you are simply issued the 5 year ACR-I card as there is no probational 1 year reapplication requirement.

Yeah...I have no idea what the rules are for a 13G visa.

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I believe there is an FBI representative at the US Embassy in Manila. If you need a clearance, I would suppose they have the capability to pull a file (electronically), print it and certify it. If so, there wouldn't be much point in sending an FBI clearance through a Philippine Consulate after you get it. 

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JamesMusslewhite

I believe there is an FBI representative at the US Embassy in Manila. If you need a clearance, I would suppose they have the capability to pull a file (electronically), print it and certify it. If so, there wouldn't be much point in sending an FBI clearance through a Philippine Consulate after you get it. 

Except it is required to authenticate the document by the Immigration office...

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