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CHB Walls-Blocks In Line Or Staggered?


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Structural integrity for what purpose? They are simply a rebar reinforced space filler. End of story.

 

That's what I've always thought as well. CHB's here are Filipino drywall.

 

We used 8 inch CHB on our house in Bohol, but only because we wanted the aesthetic of thick walls.

 

Supposedly in Manila they use a heavy duty 8 chb in some single story projects and those chb's are structural and if fact there's no need for the rebar beams and columns that normally provide strength.

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CMU's Concrete Masonry Units, are quite different to "Hollow Blocks"!     I can't understand why you would hire an engineer and then not follow his advise.     cebubird, I understand that buil

It would seem that the engineer's reasoning on strength would be correct with normal Philippine CHB (which has no structural strength on its own anyway). Normal Philippine CHB is used for nothing more

Never seen a block wall made like the here in Austraila before,, my thinking is that there is only morter holding the columns to eachother and they could move independent of eachother and crack along

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Structural integrity for what purpose? ...

 

it's important to have something to put the paint on.

 

...

Anybody have any thoughts on this?

 

others have pretty much covered it, except: get a new engineer and new masons.

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thebob

In Japan, which is an earthquake prone zone, blocks are never staggered. As long as your foundation is designed properly, those walls are only ever going to hold a compressive load. In compression those walls, once skimmed will be extremely strong.

 

30 x 6 inch blocks per sack are nowhere near as strong as the concrete inside them, and the skim on the outside. It is just a waste of material making such brittle blocks.

 

 

others have pretty much covered it, except: get a new engineer and new masons.

 

I would suggest that you just leave the engineer and contractor to get on with their job. If you question their every move you will only make them angry.

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Stranded Shipscook

The engineer talks crap.

 

Do it with domino or lego and you see whats stronger.

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Stranded Shipscook

The engineer talks crap.

 

Do it with domino or lego and you see whats stronger.Let

 

him pile CHB blocks without cement and see how high he get with his straight technique in comparis to the staggered version.

 

But beware, after you demonstrated that, he lost his face and you need a new builder.

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it's important to have something to put the paint on.

 

Yeah..It sticks to something called sand and cement render like shit to a blanket .. End of story (again!)..

Edited by fred42
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The engineer talks crap. Do it with domino or lego and you see whats stronger.Let him pile CHB blocks without cement and see how high he get with his straight technique in comparis to the staggered version.

 

Perhaps you are forgetting about those things that ties them all together.. The important bits..Structural Posts, Beams, Lots of rebar going horizontally and vertically from these posts and beams through the middle of the blocks,tied with galvanized wire and then filled with concrete.

Next time you see a wall like that with a tough render finish and two coats of paint,give it a good kick..

Test your Lego theory!!..lol.

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thebob

The engineer talks crap.

 

Do it with domino or lego and you see whats stronger.

 

That isn't a valid experiment. Stacked dry blocks are only relying on friction. That isn't the case with a finished wall.

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SkyMan

Well I see all 3 of you agreed with me.I think it is probably easier for the maso since my blocks don't break easy. I have full 6" blocks made 30 per bag so they are heavy and strong.Drove around this morning to see if I might find any other walls laid in line and didn't find one.

Since you have good blocks I would have them staggered. I also wonder why your engineer plans to fill the holes with cement? The whole point of using hollow block is to save materials. If you're going to fill them with cement then don't use block at all and just pour the walls solid. Big waste of time to use block. As for inline blocks, I've only seen them used once here. The new mall in Lapu Lapu. Scary huh?
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Since you have good blocks I would have them staggered. I also wonder why your engineer plans to fill the holes with cement? The whole point of using hollow block is to save materials. If you're going to fill them with cement then don't use block at all and just pour the walls solid. Big waste of time to use block. As for inline blocks, I've only seen them used once here. The new mall in Lapu Lapu. Scary huh?

 

Hollow blocks are ALWAYS filled with concrete,no matter the size.. The whole point in using hollow blocks for a space filler is that its the cheapest method.. Far cheaper then shuttering and a concrete pour of the same wall thickness.

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shadow

Hollow blocks are ALWAYS filled with concrete,no matter the size..

 

In the Philippines this is true, but it is not true in other parts of the world where hollow blocks are made to a much higher standard.

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cebubird

In Japan, which is an earthquake prone zone, blocks are never staggered. As long as your foundation is designed properly, those walls are only ever going to hold a compressive load. In compression those walls, once skimmed will be extremely strong.

 

30 x 6 inch blocks per sack are nowhere near as strong as the concrete inside them, and the skim on the outside. It is just a waste of material making such brittle blocks.

 

 

 

I would suggest that you just leave the engineer and contractor to get on with their job. If you question their every move you will only make them angry.

 

Yep!!! Exactly what happened few minutes ago. He got all bent out of shape saying I was "questioning his integrity" and that they would just finish this phase and then I could get somebody else to finish the house. Thing is these two brothers have an OUTSTANDING reputation for honesty.

He did tell me that I "ask too many questions". HUH!!! First of all it is our house and secon I am not a millionaire, and we are putting every peso we have into this, and I think as the customer, I should have the right to question how things are being done.

We ran into an early issue when I questioned about using 10mm rebar in something versus 12mm rebar. He agreed and switched, but didn't like it.

Thanks ev erybody for all your replies.

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shadow

Yep!!! Exactly what happened few minutes ago. He got all bent out of shape saying I was "questioning his integrity" and that they would just finish this phase and then I could get somebody else to finish the house. Thing is these two brothers have an OUTSTANDING reputation for honesty.

He did tell me that I "ask too many questions". HUH!!! First of all it is our house and secon I am not a millionaire, and we are putting every peso we have into this, and I think as the customer, I should have the right to question how things are being done.

We ran into an early issue when I questioned about using 10mm rebar in something versus 12mm rebar. He agreed and switched, but didn't like it.

Thanks ev erybody for all your replies.

 

Sounds like it was inevitable from the start. Yes, you have the right to know how your house is built, and have it your way. Many Filipinos have problems in working for foreigners, as a Filipino will not question them, but the foreigner does.

 

Honesty and openness go hand in hand, it's easy to be honest if you say nothing!

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Davaoeno

Yep!!! Exactly what happened few minutes ago. He got all bent out of shape saying I was "questioning his integrity" and that they would just finish this phase and then I could get somebody else to finish the house. Thing is these two brothers have an OUTSTANDING reputation for honesty.

He did tell me that I "ask too many questions". HUH!!! First of all it is our house and secon I am not a millionaire, and we are putting every peso we have into this, and I think as the customer, I should have the right to question how things are being done.

We ran into an early issue when I questioned about using 10mm rebar in something versus 12mm rebar. He agreed and switched, but didn't like it.

Thanks ev erybody for all your replies.

 

I have been through this exact same thing last year. Usually I build and then find a buyer, but last year a guy asked me to custom build him a house . The buyer entered into an agreement for me to build the house, then was onsite all day every day and wanted to interfere at every single step. If you have questions or stipulations do it BEFORE you sign the agreement, not afterwards. You want it done a certain way ? thats fine- just make sure that that is what you stipulate up front - not during the building process ! You want 12mm - then put it in the agreement! You want chb made at 40 per bag?- then put it in the agreement . This buyer drove me nuts by constantly changing his mind - or asking for things that had not been agreed on .

 

I think its best for both you and the builder that you find someone else to finish the house. Expect your cost to increase considerably .

 

I just finished these 2 houses last month:

post-8045-0-71434000-1357867895_thumb.jpg

post-8045-0-32812200-1357868048_thumb.jpg

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