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Social Security Proof of Life Forms

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cebubird

Therein lies the problem. Tricare has sent me mail at my physical address that has taken over 90 days to reach me. If there is anyway to have the SSA send your correspondence to you through RAO, that would be the way to go. Average time for mail to get here through the FPO system in two to three weeks. Provided you check your mail periodically at RAO, that should give you ample time to return the questionaire to them. Of course, that option is only available to those who qualify for membership in RAO (retired military and disabled veterans).

 

I ALWAYS-repeat-ALWAYS received it at my RAO box.

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RogerDuMond

I am wondering if this is something for those who have an overseas address? I have been collecting Social Security for nine years and have never had to submit proof of life, but then my mailing address and direct deposit bank account are in the US.

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colemanlee

I am wondering if this is something for those who have an overseas address? I have been collecting Social Security for nine years and have never had to submit proof of life, but then my mailing address and direct deposit bank account are in the US.

As have I, but all my stuff goes through a US address and bank....IMHO the very best way to do it.....

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RogerDat

I have a post office box and received a second notice last month, no idea where the first went.

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delancey

I am wondering if this is something for those who have an overseas address? I have been collecting Social Security for nine years and have never had to submit proof of life, but then my mailing address and direct deposit bank account are in the US.

You got it!

 

In practice what triggers 7162 is your mailing address out of country.

 

SSA communication via U.S. mail yields no 7162, and that is while also truthfully reporting a foreign physical address. A foreign physical address being the mailing address is what triggers the form.

 

US SSA has a bigger budget then some entire countries so their will always be confusion and changes. For instance, in practice they don't appear to apply this either:

 

https://secure.ssa.gov/poms.nsf/lnx/0900703302

 

(Direct deposit in a U.S. bank is obviously normal now even as a long term expat.)

 

There are now simple methods in place to report mailing address and physical address. You just keep the U.S. mailing address and report the foreign physical address.

 

Gov't is never consistant so YMMV. PM if questions.

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Headshot

You got it!

 

In practice what triggers 7162 is your mailing address out of country.

 

Nice try. I have a US mailing address and my benefits are direct-deposited in my US credit union, but I had to fill out 7162's for both myself and my daughter this year. It was a pain in the butt since I was in the US at the time but my wife and daughter were in Cebu.

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RogerDuMond

Nice try. I have a US mailing address and my benefits are direct-deposited in my US credit union, but I had to fill out 7162's for both myself and my daughter this year. It was a pain in the butt since I was in the US at the time but my wife and daughter were in Cebu.

 

 

Maybe the dependent was the trigger in your case.

 

My mother died three years ago at 93 and she never received one either.

Edited by RogerDuMond

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delancey

Nice try. I have a US mailing address and my benefits are direct-deposited in my US credit union, but I had to fill out 7162's for both myself and my daughter this year. It was a pain in the butt since I was in the US at the time but my wife and daughter were in Cebu.

See that, your milage did vary. Where did SSA mail them U.S. or here?

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Headshot

See that, your milage did vary. Where did SSA mail them U.S. or here?

 

They were mailed to my US address.

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Headshot

Maybe the dependent was the trigger in your case.

 

My mother died three years ago at 93 and she never received one either.

 

I went into the Social Security Office in the US, and they said who gets the forms is purely the luck of the draw. There may be various "triggers" that increase your chances for having a form mailed to you, but never consider yourself safe just because you haven't received one of these forms in the past. The people at the SSA office didn't know of any triggers, but that doesn't mean there aren't. I seriously doubt that it is so simple as just not having a US mailing address. That said, using a Philippine mailing address wil significantly increase the chance that you won't receive the forms when they are sent, and if that happens, you will be digging yourself out of a hole when they cut off your benefits.

Edited by Headshot

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Skywalker

If I were in this position, I'm not because I am many many years away from a state pension, I wouldn't really have an issue of sending in a form once a year regardless of notice.

 

It's hardly an ordeal. At least it removes the uncertainty. Is it a viable suggestion?

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delancey

They were mailed to my US address.

So although you got the 7162's the driving issue/biggest problem of delivery reliability was solved. Good deal.

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Headshot

If I were in this position, I'm not because I am many many years away from a state pension, I wouldn't really have an issue of sending in a form once a year regardless of notice.

 

It's hardly an ordeal. At least it removes the uncertainty. Is it a viable suggestion?

 

No. You don't have the form unless they send it to you. It is pre-printed in your name and sent with a return envelope. You are right that it wouldn't normally be an inconvenience, but since both I and my wife had to sign the forms before they were sent back, the logistics of getting them around to the other side of the world were what presented the problem. That was why I visited the SSA office ... so I could ask them what I should do. They gave me a simple solution, and I followed their instructions. There were no problems.

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batman2525

 

 

I am wondering if this is something for those who have an overseas address?

 

I receive my SS in the UK.......I did receive a note from the SS saying I would be getting one of those forms.

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Salty Dog

For those of you who are permanent residents using a USA mailing address to make the SSA think you live in the USA, or if you feel you don't have to tell the SSA because you claim you're only a tourist in the Philippines. Both require you to notify the SSA.
 

Reporting Changes is Your Responsibility
 
If you receive benefits from Social Security, you have a legal obligation to report changes, which could affect your eligibility for disability, retirement, and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. You must report any changes that may affect your benefits immediately, and no later than 10 days after the end of the month in which the change occurred.
 
Changes you need to report range from a change of address to traveling outside the United States for 30 consecutive days. To get a list of reporting responsibilities under disability, please read our publication What You Need to Know When You get Social Security Disability Benefits, and for SSI, read What You Need to Know When You Get Supplemental Security Income. If you’re receiving retirement benefits, What You Need to Know When You Get Retirement or Survivors Benefits is also helpful.
 

Life changes can affect your benefits. You may be due additional payments, or you may be overpaid and have to pay us back because you didn’t report the overpayment in a timely manner. The SSI program may apply a penalty that will reduce your benefits if you fail to report a change, or if you reported the change later than 10 days after the end of the month in which the change occurred. If you fail to report changes in a timely way, or if you intentionally make a false statement, we may stop your SSI, disability, and retirement benefits. We may also impose a sanction against your payments. The first sanction is a loss of payments for six months. Subsequent sanctions are for 12 and 24 months.
 
You can report your change online at www.socialsecurity.gov, or by calling toll free at 1-800-772-1213. If you’re deaf or hearing-impaired call TTY 1-800-325-0778. Mail the information to your local Social Security office or in person if you prefer. If you receive SSI, you should ask about our options to use the automated toll-free SSI Telephone Wage Reporting Service or the free SSI Mobile Wage Reporting Smartphone app.
 
If you receive benefits and need to change your address or direct deposit, you can conveniently do so by creating a my Social Security account at www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount.
 
Get the right check, in the right amount, at the right time, by reporting changes right away!
 
http://blog.ssa.gov/reporting-changes-is-your-responsibility/

Edited by Salty Dog

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