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littlejohn

Herbal Dengue Fever Treatments

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Tawa-Tawa.

 

Mangagaw is what they call that plant here on Cebu.

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thebob

At least those of us that have had are supposed to be immune for some time. Its debated whether it is permanent or not but we should have a few years at least.

 

Personal opinion: I think if you have had it once and live around it anytime you get bit by a contaminated mosquito you get an immune booster. That is why they don't know how long your immune.

 

I don't know where you are getting your information, but once you have contracted dengue, it inoculates you to that type, but makes you far more susceptible to complications from the remaining types.

 

As has been stated, many "herbal remedies" such as aspirin are later identified as medicinal drugs. A large amount of "herbal medicines" and derivatives, like aspirin are "non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs" (NSAIDs), it is exactly these compounds which should be avoided when you have dengue.

 

The danger that the mystery concoction of "herbs" contains NSAID's can't be avoided. I would never recommend , supplementing known pharmaceuticals with herbal remedies because, a) it hides if a particular course of treatment is successful, and B) the unknown active drug in the herbal remedy may be counter indicative in combination.

 

Mangagaw which is also known as Tawi tawi is known scientifically as Euphorbia Hirata. In clinical trials the claim that it can increase platelet count is unsubstantiated.

 

Camotes tops, Mulungai and Papaya leaves also show no clinical difference from placebo.

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Maybe Next Yr

There are also 3 strains of it. So you could have one and get two and three later.

 

The Physician in the ER said she got it 2 times!

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I would never recommend supplementing known pharmaceuticals with herbal remedies

Well Bob, neither would I...if there were any "known pharmaceuticals" shown to successfully treat Dengue Fever. Unfortunately, there are none. If you go to the hospital with Dengue Fever, they will give you an IV to keep you hydrated and check you periodically to see how the disease is progressing. They just let the disease run its course.

 

Now, I think that going to the hospital to be under constant medical care and rehydration is important with Dengue, but in the absence of any "known pharmaceuticals" to actually treat the disease, I would have no problem also (along with hospital care) trying a herbal remedy that the locals have used for generations to treat the disease. Certainly you aren't suggesting that every (or even most) herbal remedies contain NSAIDS. That would really be silly.

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thebob
Certainly you aren't suggesting that every (or even most) herbal remedies contain NSAIDS. That would really be silly.

 

I'm not suggesting that at all. If herbal remedies have an effect, then they contain drugs, and if your condition deteriorates then the doctor will use drugs to stop you going into shock, or to restart your heart or whatever. These drugs may be counter indicative to the herbs.

 

The Philippines has extremely well researched flora. If there were any merit in these herbal remedies, then dengue mortality rates would show it, in comparison to other dengue endemic areas with differing flora. The data does not support the claims.

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The Philippines has extremely well researched flora. If there were any merit in these herbal remedies, then dengue mortality rates would show it, in comparison to other dengue endemic areas with differing flora. The data does not support the claims.

 

Interesting...but maybe not completely accurate.

 

Philippine Council for Health Research and Development

Tawa-tawa contains active ingredients that may help dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) patients – study

 

Published on Monday, 10 September 2012 16:48

Written by Edmon B. Agron

 

Tawa-tawa (Euphorbia hirta), also known as “gatas-gatas,” is a hairy herb grown in open grasslands, roadsides and pathways. This indigenous plant is considered as one of the most popular folkloric treatment for dengue in the Philippines.

 

Intent on finding out the truth behind tawa-tawa’s curative properties, students of the University of Sto Tomas (UST) – Faculty of Pharmacy conducted a study entitled “Investigation of the anti-thrombocytopenic property of euphorbia hirta linn (Tawa-Tawa) decoction in rat models. The study aimed to verify the effects of tawa-tawa decoction to a dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) patient showing a symptom of thrombocytopenia (low platelet count due to excessive bleeding).

 

In the study, the students used chloramphenicol, ethanol and heparin to induce thrombocytopenia on rat models, mimicking dengue hemorrhagic fever. They administered tawa-tawa decoction to the sample groups and collected blood samples to check for platelet count, bleeding time (duration of bleeding), and blood clotting times in several stages of the experiment.

 

Results showed that platelet count increased to 47% depending on the drug used to induce thrombocytopenia. Bleeding time was reduced up to 62% while blood clotting time decreased to 58% compared to the control groups.

 

Based on the results, students concluded that administering tawa-tawa decoction to animal models help improve their healing mechanism. Tawa-tawa was able to promote cell production, and prevents platelet destruction. Likewise, the improvement in the cell bleeding time and clotting time provided evidence that the indigenous plant can preserve and promote the hemostatic function of platelets.

 

The students also discovered phenolic compounds in tawa-tawa, active ingredients suspected to be responsible in the increased platelet counts of tested animals. In an interview, Mr. Ryan Justin Raynes, one of the student researchers said that through a phenolic determination assay, they were able to identify ‘minute’ phenolic compound in tawa-tawa samples. “Although there were small amount of phenolic compound in tawa-tawa, this was sufficient to exert effect promoting quality and quantity of platelets,” Mr. Raynes said.

 

Because of the study’s significant findings, it won the first prize in the PCHRD – Gruppo Medica Award held during the 6th Philippine National Health Research System (PNHRS) Week held at Sofitel Manila last 10 August 2012. PCHRD – Gruppo Medica Award is given to undergraduate students engaged in herbal medicine research that have potential for practical or commercial applications.

http://www.pchrd.dost.gov.ph/index.php/2012-05-23-07-46-36/2012-05-24-00-01-32/5296-tawa-tawa-contains-active-ingredients-that-may-help-dengue-hemorrhagic-fever-dhf-patients-study

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Then there is this...

 

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Clinical Summary

 

Papaya tree is commonly found in tropical areas around the world. The fruits are consumed as food and as medicine; dried and powdered stem and leaves are used to prepare medicinal teas against infections and to improve digestion. Papaya leaves and their extracts are also marketed as dietary supplements to enhance the immune system, to improve platelet function, and to prevent chemotherapy-related adverse effects.

 

An in vitro study showed that papaya leaves exhibit anti-tumor and immunomodulatory effects (1). Papaya leaf extracts also contain antibacterial compounds that inhibit the growth of a wide variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (4).

 

In mice, a powdered suspension of papaya leaves increased thrombocyte count (2) and a water extract reduced alcohol-induced stomach damage (5).

 

According to a case report, a water extract of papaya leaves was shown to increase the platelet count of a patient with Dengue fever (3).

 

Papaya leaf extract showed low toxicity (6) in an animal model, but it has not been studied in humans. An international patent has been filed for its use in increasing low platelet counts (7).

 

Of course, they did protect themselves from being sued with this disclaimer...

 

Papaya leaf extracts should not be used as a treatment for cancer or for low platelet count until more is known about its efficacy and adverse effects in humans.

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thebob

Your first article seems to be contradicted by this...

 

http://www.biotecharticles.com/Bioinformatics-Article/Herbal-Remedy-of-Dengue-Fever-Euphorbia-Hirta-Plant-Mangagaw-plant-578.html

 

I'd like to point out the last paragraph.

 

Your second quote appears to rely on one case report.

 

I'd also like to point out that single studies, conducted on mice, by students, have a long way to go before being accepted as acceptable treatment for humans.

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NM1938

Simple and fast acting cures for dengue fever. (Newbie's 1st post)

  • Papaya/neem leaf extraxct-- combination leaf extract (NPLX) or (PLX) without neem, been scientifically endorsed. You need to read the British Medical Journal, The Times Of India, medical professional journals, and the findings and endorsement of medicine and prevention research institutions to confirm this.  This information dates back to 2008.  It's not new and has not been refuted. 
     
  • Tawa tawa-- a powerhouse weed that needs to be used in moderation and caution.  It is definitely a grandma powerhouse special and get the results as fast acting as the others I mention.
     
  • Camote tea-- camote/sweet potato, same thing.  Boiling the leaves for just 5/minutes with a few 1/inch cuts of lemon grass, I don't think we'll see dengue fever in our household.

Personal experience: Fortunately, in early 2012 I read in the Inquirer, the national paper in the Philippines, about a man experencing long term hospitalization because his platelet counts would never restore to normal levels.  A family member talk him into drinking-- camote tea!  In just a few days he walk, not crawled out to the hospital and the billings ceased on that date.  Reading this, for myself, it stuck in my alternative, DIY, mind.

 

Kim, my wife's teen son, living in Leyte with relatives, of his own choosing, since I insisted he had to go to school and not internet cafes during school hours, contracted dengue fever.  Immediately, in response to my prompting, Alicia sent word to the doctor let Kim drink camote tea.  The doctor expressed one reservation, do not use the leaves with the red coloring, they will intefere  with lab tests.  He drank the tea and in 3/days he was ready for discharge.  The hospital kept him two additional 5/days until we were able to wire transfer payment in full.

 

Regardless of naysayer postings regardless of who they are, up to the WHO & CDC, NPLX, tawa tawa, or the simplist and easiest to prepare and enjoy-- camote teas, these plant sources speedy raise platelet and white blood cell counts within the first 24/hr

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NM1938

I wasn't finished.  Continued:

raises blood and white blood cell counts within the first 24/hours.  All this can be read online, Google searching the British Medical Journal, The Times Of India, and  a host of other resources, not the WHO & CDC bulletins of couse.

 

48 postings to go before I can include links.  It is my hope in 2013 we will reduce the lenght of days of suffering, weeks or months of young children and infants, some who never got a chance to be a naysyer to natural speedy cures that work and are ignored by those who endorse outdated treatments for dengue fever.

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alexccms

Thrombogenic means it increases the likelihood that you will form blood clots.  It does NOT mean that it increases platelet count (those second year medical students need to hit their books a little harder).  If you're hemorrhaging then a thrombogenic agent might be a good thing (not to mention blood, platelet, and clotting factor/plasma transfusions).  If you have a low platelet count but aren't bleeding, then developing clots is just going to consume what few platelets you have.

 

Being bedridden increases your risk of developing DVTs and PEs; if you're not bleeding then why take a thrombogenic agent?  While drinking the concoction may be in line with encouraging oral hydration, the herb may be of little use or even detrimental.  

 

recommended treatment may vary depending on the specific presentation of dengue.

Edited by alexccms
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jme

I think I had this fever last year when I was living near a tropical beach. I was in the city for a few days and we had a buffet style breakfast at the hotel as it was part of the deal. When then took the long trip back by bus first and on the bus I started feeling not so good and some stomach discomfort. Now here is the interesting part. .. Normally I eat a good few pieces of tropical fruit each day as I firmly believe they help you with natural protection against these tropical sicknesses and this article is especially interesting since it is also using parts of the tropical fruit tree. But since we had been staying in the city and at a hotel for 4-5 days I was not eating my normal tropical fruit. So I think that is one of the reasons I got sick.

 

When I got home I started feeling weak and then over the next week or two I got really terrible headaches. I never usually get headaches so this was surprising to me. Anyway we tried a few things, natural and from the drug store but nothing worked. Since I had not been aware that this could be this fever then I had no idea what I had but I manged to get out for a walk and some sun each day and eventually got better but I lost a lot of weight as I never enjoyed food with this fever. It took over a month before I felt normal again and was eating and looking healthy. So it definitely can be a big holiday stopper so you need to be careful of this fever. Oh, the only thing that really helped was some strong pain killers as the normal ones would hardly do anything for the throbbing headaches. Some of the headaches were so intense I would compare it to someone holding your head in a vice and then smashing it with a sledgehammer, yeah that's how bad it can get so avoid this fever big time! EAT YOUR TROPICAL FRUIT DAILY and Buko juice etc...

Edited by jme

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alexccms

You don't get dengue from breakfast buffets.  Food poisoning and dehydration maybe.

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goldote

Occasional minor food poisoning is a great colon cleanse. 

I'm careful. I screen all windows plus my bed is covered with a mosquito net. 

I don't like Deet, but it never hurts to put some on your hat and shoes.

I've seen mosquitoes greet people at the airport. 

I eat some garlic everyday and it seems to slow down insects.

You can kill them while they're scratching around looking for a tastier spot to bite.

Way to many bugs will follow us under the net if there's any opening, in spite of the nightly fire.  

Many folks think we're crazy for screening out the great outdoors. 

Eating local plants is never trendy, but I choose to enjoy them. 

Local folks stay pretty healthy considering what they're drinking and breathing. 

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NM1938

  • 2008 in the Sri Lanka Family Physician Journal Doctor Sanath Hettige published his findings which have since become know as a papaya leaf extract cure (PLXC).

     

  • 2011 in the British Medical Journal, Dr. Hettige revealed his findings of papaya leaf extract (PLX) being used as a home cure, under his supervision who had refused hospital treatment-- all those who followed what he had revealed to the world, recovered.  No treatment center involved.  His published findings remain unchallenged to this day.

     

  • 2012, 2013 The Times Of India has been reporting Neem/papaya leaf extract (NPLXC) is a home cure for dengue fever, and now endorsed by several medicine and research institutions.  It's all in the news.

     

  • Camote tea when searched on Google Wikipedia you will see what wonders this plant is capable of. 

     

  • Tawa tawa is the weed referred to by Littlejohn.  It needs to be used with caution and moderation-- its powerful.

Long before patented medicines took over and induced fear into the hearts of the 'world public', these things were better known by our grandparents or great grandparents may be more exact.  Research institutions are now saying publicly, they are rediscovering the wonders of herbal medicine long forgotten by modern teachings and practices. /NM

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