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InternetTough

Did You Know About This Philippine Law?

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InternetTough

Apparently the new anti-cybersex law also makes libeling someone online to be an offence potentially punishable by 12 years in prison without the possibility of parole.

 

From a BBC article:

 

Free press threat?

Although the law talks specifically about cybercrime, Philippine media organisations have expressed concerns that it may also be used to curb press freedom because it lists internet libel as cybercrime.

According to the act, someone found guilty of libellous comments online, including comments made on social networks and blogs, could be jailed for up to 12 years with no possibility of parole.

The Centre for Media Freedom and Responsibility said the act showed "how restrictive rather than expansive is the mindset of the country's legislators and of Aquino himself" in promoting transparency, press freedom, and free expression.

 

The whole article can be found:

http://www.bbc.co.uk...nology-19659801

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InternetTough

Well, that didn't work out! I don't know why the quoted material is so small. I ask a moderator to please fix it, if possible.

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Woolf

Free press threat?

Although the law talks specifically about cybercrime, Philippine media organisations have expressed concerns that it may also be used to curb press freedom because it lists internet libel as cybercrime.

According to the act, someone found guilty of libellous comments online, including comments made on social networks and blogs, could be jailed for up to 12 years with no possibility of parole.

The Centre for Media Freedom and Responsibility said the act showed "how restrictive rather than expansive is the mindset of the country's legislators and of Aquino himself" in promoting transparency, press freedom, and free expression.

 

The whole article can be found:

http://www.bbc.co.uk...nology-19659801

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SkyMan

To my knowledge libel has always been illegal here. Online or otherwise.

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tom_shor

Grave Oral Defimation. It's not as fun as it sounds.

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broden

Grave Oral Defimation. It's not as fun as it sounds.

 

was a great movie though

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InternetTough

"Three times longer imprisonment," said Harry Roque, a professor of constitutional law at the University of Philippines to ABC News. "Conviction for e-libel now comes with a definite prison term."

 

 

Here is another article: http://www.cbc.ca/news/yourcommunity/2012/09/cybersex-and-online-libel-criminalized-in-the-philippines.html

 

Cybersex and online libel criminalized in the Philippines

by Lauren O'Neil Posted: September 20, 2012 8:06 PM Last Updated: September 20, 2012 8:26 PM Read 0 comments0

Categories: Science & Technology, World

(iStock)A law has been passed in the Philippines criminalizing cybersex and explicit webcam chats, regardless of whether or not participants are consenting adults or professional sex workers.

 

The Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012, signed by President Beningo Aquino III Tuesday, defines cybersex as "The willful engagement, maintenance, control, or operation, directly or indirectly, of any lascivious exhibition of sexual organs or sexual activity, with the aid of a computer system, for favour or consideration".

 

One of the law's authors, senator Edgardo Angara, said that the act is intended to help authorities "detect, investigate and suppress cybercrime such as hacking, cybersex, identity theft, spamming, and child p*ornography online," according to the BBC.

 

Police in the Philippines told the BBC in 2011 that an estimated thousands of young women are forced to work in illegal, backroom cybersex dens by human traffickers in the country.

 

While many are crying foul over the cybersex provision's broad language and harsh penalties (six months to 10 years in prison and fines of up to $25,000,) digital activists are more concerned with the act's anti-libel provision.

 

A person found guilty of posting libelous comments on Twitter, Facebook, blogs or elsewhere on the internet could now spend up to 12 years in prison under the new act, with no possibility of parole.

 

"Three times longer imprisonment," said Harry Roque, a professor of constitutional law at the University of the Philippines to ABC News. "Conviction for e-libel now comes with a definite prison term."

 

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is a US non-profit organization that works to protect human rights online. The organization is calling the act "a troubling development for free expression."

 

"EFF is gravely concerned about the implications of the libel provision in the Cybercrime Act and supports local journalists and free expression advocates in opposing it," reads a Sept. 18 blog post on the organization's website.

 

The International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) has also joined the National Union of Journalists of the Philippines (NUJP) to weigh in on the matter.

 

"[We are] greatly concerned that the inclusion of online content in the act could be used to curtail freedom of expression online," reads the IFJ's blog. "The NUJP believe that the Act is a threat not only to the media but to any member of the public with access to the Internet."

 

What are your thoughts on the legislation? Are human rights being violated, or are the government's actions justified?

 

Tags: POV

Edited by Paul
sorted hyperlink

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spooks

Ask Evan the pedo, he may if he ever does return be taking a very keen interest in this Act especially its pointy end!!

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Skywalker

But if somebody expresses a libellous statement here, is it that person who is prosecuted, or is it the site owner, or both?

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Mr.T

GREAT! I love this law.

 

Now all the lame guys who only insult and talk bad about other people ONLINE will start thinking twice, hopefully.

Edited by Mr.T
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spooks

assuming they can think...ooops there goes 10 years in the slammer :frantic:

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RogerDuMond

But if somebody expresses a libellous statement here, is it that person who is prosecuted, or is it the site owner, or both?

 

All of the above and the moderators. This is one reason we ask that potentially libelous statements about the government, the laws and people not be written in the public part of the forum and why some posts are removed.

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poby

Many don't realize it but we are living in the internet golden age. But it won't last. Governments are gradually legislating under the guise of "protecting the children" or fighting a "war on terrorism" etc, laws that chip away at the freedom so speak your mind. Time will come when there will be nothing offensive or illegal or naughty or controversial online. No sex, no piracy - and no dissenting voices to question the status quo. Control the media and you control the people. Even underground channels like the silk road will be shut down as will any attempt deemed to be politically incorrect or at odds with what some government thinks is politically correct.

 

It's already begun but it's happening so slowly that people won't realize what they have lost until it's gone and maybe not even then. The result will be intellectual and cultural stagnation and decline. The greatest failing of western democracy is the ease with which lines of cultural communication can be manipulated without seeming to do so.

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InternetTough

But if somebody expresses a libellous statement here, is it that person who is prosecuted, or is it the site owner, or both?

 

The poster can be held to account, according to the new law. One does not need to be a site owner.

 

It is not only Facebook, but all of its users in the Philippines that have to be careful.

 

So much for the electronic bathroom wall, out of reach of the authorities---and more.

 

It is a good thing and a bad thing, in my opinion.

 

It is a little like the introduction of stricter drunk-driving laws. One has to approach an activity with more deliberation that one should always have been careful about before,anyways. But with the law involved, bigger personal fiascoes are possible.

 

In my opinion, this site doesn't have much personal gossip, anyhow, but the wire has been lifted somewhat higher---in case of failure.

Edited by InternetTough

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broden

the servers for the forum are not in the RP and the owner is in Cambodia.

 

as to what the authorities might try to do to a poster who is in country is anybody's guess

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