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chimellie

Bisaya grammer

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chimellie

There's a post " Bisaya word for the day", I really enjoy that and I was wondering if anyone could start a new post : "Bisaya grammar for the day "

 

Thanks in advance

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the_nanny

this is really quite difficult cuz cebuanos are not really much particular with cebuano grammar

 

its funny to say but there's no school here that teaches cebuano language nor grammar

 

but if u like to ask me something i probably can help :D

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Bet_Busta

Maybe we can start with sentence structure:

 

Subject..............predicate

 

Subject.......verb.....object of the verb

 

Akong gitalhan ang lapis.

I sharpen the pencil.

 

 

Or the passive tense:

 

The pencil was sharpen by me.

Ang lapis akong gitalhan.

 

While the passive English sentence sounds awkward, the Cebuano version is frequently use.

 

Nanny, am I helping or am I further confusing our students?

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Ginamos

Busta, personally I think your questions can be asked in the "Word for the day" thread, rather than having a separate thread.

 

Too "the_nanny" good luck finding your "lucky guy" :D

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chimellie
Maybe we can start with sentence structure:

 

Subject..............predicate

 

Subject.......verb.....object of the verb

 

Akong gitalhan ang lapis.

I sharpen the pencil.

Or the passive tense:

 

The pencil was sharpen by me.

Ang lapis akong gitalhan.

 

While the passive English sentence sounds awkward, the Cebuano version is frequently use.

 

Nanny, am I helping or am I further confusing our students?

 

Thanks Bet and Nanny. When do you use the word "akong" as I and "ako" or "ko" as I ? for example : " Mingaw ko nimo" means I miss you . But you can't say " mingaw akong nimo" . Is it because mingaw is an adjetive therefore akong becomes ko ??????

 

Thanks again

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the_nanny
Thanks Bet and Nanny. When do you use the word "akong" as I and "ako" or "ko" as I ? for example : " Mingaw ko nimo" means I miss you . But you can't say " mingaw akong nimo" . Is it because mingaw is an adjetive therefore akong becomes ko ??????

 

Thanks again

 

chimellie if you really want to learn about bisaya i can give u tutorials.

 

just see my post under classified ads. i'l be happy to response! :D

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Paul
its funny to say but there's no school here that teaches cebuano language nor grammar

 

 

And, out of all the newspapers in Cebu ... how many are in Cebuano?

 

One.

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the_nanny
And, out of all the newspapers in Cebu ... how many are in Cebuano?

 

One.

 

actually there are a number of newpaper in cebuano language, though, only one is really popular which superbalita. its probably because other cebuano newspapers publishes obsence articles and some articles that are not really important for most people. take for example the newspaper BANAT. i dont know if they are still circulating but they have section there that describe a scene with sex and everybody in here knows that sex is still a big taboo in the cebuano or rather the filipino soceity.

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Bet_Busta
Thanks Bet and Nanny. When do you use the word "akong" as I and "ako" or "ko" as I ? for example : " Mingaw ko nimo" means I miss you . But you can't say " mingaw akong nimo" . Is it because mingaw is an adjetive therefore akong becomes ko ??????

 

Thanks again

 

"Akong" is a shortcut of 2 words, "ako" and "nga" a connecting word.

"Akong gikuha ang lapis" with "gi" as a prefix.

I took the pencil.

 

Most of the Chinese here are not particular with connecting words or prefix/suffix or article

"Ako kuha lapis" and still are understood.

 

 

 

"Mingaw ko nimo" is a shortcut of

"Gimingaw ako nimo" or "Gimingaw ako kanimo".

verb subject object of the verb

 

It's another way of saying "Ako gimingaw kanimo"

I miss you.

 

"Mingaw" the root word by itself is either a noun "loneliness".

When you add the prefix "gi" as in "gimingaw" it becomes a verb in the past or present tense.

When you add the suffix "on" as in "mingawon" it becomes a verb in the future tense.

"Mingawon ko nimo kon wala ka na."

"I will miss you when you are gone."

 

Removing the connecting words like "mingaw ko nimo" tends to connote somebody who just

learnt speaking and therefore "child-like" ..... more passionate than the puritan "gimingaw ako kanimo."

 

You need not speak puritan Cebuano to be understood. Just like there in US, you still understand

when a Texan says: "The sun has rizz, the sun has set, and here we izz in Texas yet".

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chimellie
chimellie if you really want to learn about bisaya i can give u tutorials.

 

just see my post under classified ads. i'l be happy to response! :huh:

 

Nanny: Ako wala kwarta. Ako tihick :lol:

Thank you for the lesson Bet_Busta. I really enjoy your post, excellent Bisaya lesson . I think it's harder to learn Bisaya than English.

I know how to speak and write Vietnamese if anyone wants to learn

 

Salamat

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Paul

Wala ko kasabot sa tanang bisaya nga pulong! :huh::lol: Wait .. i meant to say .. I don't understand.... oh never mind. :)

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the_nanny
"Akong" is a shortcut of 2 words, "ako" and "nga" a connecting word.

"Akong gikuha ang lapis" with "gi" as a prefix.

I took the pencil.

 

the Akong word is use either for possesion or the person saying is the doer of the action.

 

Akong is a combination of two words, "ako" and "ang", (bet not "nga").

 

this word is use if the tense of the verb is in past tense only, that's if the sentence is indicating

that the person is doing something. the prefix "gi" indicates the verb is in past tense.

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chimellie

Daghan salamat Nanny.

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Craig H
<snipped> The prefix "gi" indicates the verb is in past tense.

 

What about the prefix "gihi" as in gihigugma? Gihigugma ko nimo or Gihigugma ko ikaw? I am never sure when to use "nimo" versus "ikaw". I wonder if there is one that is more polite and formal, or one that is simply just more commonly used.

 

I am working hard to learn bisaya with the goal of becoming completely fluent.

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the_nanny
What about the prefix "gihi" as in gihigugma? Gihigugma ko nimo or Gihigugma ko ikaw? I am never sure when to use "nimo" versus "ikaw". I wonder if there is one that is more polite and formal, or one that is simply just more commonly used.

 

I am working hard to learn bisaya with the goal of becoming completely fluent.

 

sorry guys i made a mistake over what i said about "gi". its not a prefix that means totally the verb is in past tense but

 

rather the action is done from the past until the time the person is saying the sentence.

 

actually, its gi-higugma. the root word there is the action word higugma meaning the action of loving or simply loving.

 

as for the 1st, if it ends with a period, "Gihigugma ko nimo." means "You're loving me." but if it ends with a question

 

mark "Gihigugma ko nimo?" it means "Do you love me?"

 

as for the second "Gihigugma ko ikaw" , it simply means "i am loving you."

 

as to when to use "nimo" or "ikaw"

 

u use "nimo" if you are making a declarative sentence in which the doer of the action is the one you are talking to. or you

 

could also use it in a question, asking the person you are talking to if he/she is doing the action.

 

u use "ikaw" if you are making a sentence in which the one you are talking to is the receiver of the action.

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