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Is it True -Citizenship, if married to Filipina ?


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My sister-in-law, who is married to an American and living in America for a long time has given me some advice.

 

She believes that if I am married to a Filipino, which I am, I can get a duel citizenship for the Philippines.

 

Is this true, and has anyone done this.

 

I want to be able to own land, and if I retire there, not to have to pay lots & lots for visa extensions.

 

What ya think ??

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I am certainly no expert, but i think your sis in law is wrong. As far as i am aware, you have to renounce your current citizenship to qualify for PH citizenship. Renouncing your home country citize

http://travel.state....s/cis_1753.html   US State Department Services Dual Nationality       The concept of dual nationality means that a person is a citizen of two countries at the sam

Actually, Community involvement isn't even stipulated. Here's from the law regarding community:  "Third. He must be of good moral character and believes in the principles underlying the Philippine C

lazydays

I am certainly no expert, but i think your sis in law is wrong.

As far as i am aware, you have to renounce your current citizenship to qualify for PH citizenship.

Renouncing your home country citizenship could come back to haunt you later e.g Home country Pensions, Benefits, Healthcare etc, etc.

I am led to believe, that to qualify for PH citizenship you must remain permanently in the PH for 5yrs prior, no leaving, travelling overseas etc.

You would certainly need to study all the pros and cons related to this issue.

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Things You'll Need


  • Certified copy of applicant's birth certificate

  • Five passport-sized pictures of the applicant

  • Certified copy of marriage certificate
  • Proof of financial capacity

  • Medical certificate

  • Income tax return for the previous three years

  • School diploma or transcripts if enrolled in or have attended a Philippine school
     

Instructions


    • 1


      Complete five copies of the citizenship application and attach a passport-sized photograph and a thumbprint to each copy of the application. (See Resources below)

    • 2


      Submit the application copies along with a certified copy of your birth certificate, marriage certificate, school transcripts, medical documentation, financial capacity, and income tax returns to the secretariat of the Special Committee on Naturalization.


    •  

    • 3


      Provide the secretariat with your payment of 40,000 pesos for your citizenship application. This fee is a required fee and does not guarantee your citizenship. The Special Committee on Naturalization will review your application within 15 days of submission. If your application is found to be in order and all documentation has been properly provided, the Committee will place an ad in the newspaper which posts portions of your application including your name, the items that qualify you for citizenship, and other personal information. This document will be published once a week for three weeks in a row. Your application will also be posted in the Department of Foreign Affairs and the National Bureau of Investigations buildings for 30 days. These offices will also provide the Committee with any negative information about your personal records.

    • 4


      Wait for your interview notification. You will receive a phone call for an interview within 60 days of your application or the last date that the application was published in the newspaper. You will be notified if any additional forms are required for the interview and you will be provided a date, time and location where the interview will be held.

    • 5


      Wait for your notice of approval. You will be mailed a letter notifying you if your application for citizenship has been approved. When you receive your approval letter you will be required to pay 50,000 pesos for the approval process within 30 days of receiving the letter.

    • 6


      Complete the oath of allegiance to the Republic of the Philippines. You will be provided the location and date that you can complete the oath when you receive your approval letter. You must complete the oath within 60 days of receiving your certificate of naturalization. You must pay 50,000 pesos on the day you complete the oath of allegiance. This payment is the final payment for your certificate of naturalization.

       

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Brucewayne

You will also be informed that you must renounce your citizenship, but if you are a U.S. citizen, that is not true, as you would have to appear in person on U.S. soil, pay a fee of appx. $250.00 and be approved.

The U.S. prefers that you become a dual citizen rather than renouncing your citizenship even though the Philippine officials say that the U.S. will not allow dual citizenship (another lie).

Too many wealthy U.S. citizens have renounced their citizen-ships to avoid taxes and some try to do so when a pending felony charge is likely to be served on them.

It is probably wiser to simply become a permanent resident here then do the 25/25 year lease.

That is the closest you will come to owning property in the Philippines as a foreigner and if you put your wife or child on the lease, it will still be in force after your death, giving your descendants time to live and plan their future before the lease runs out, ie., renewing in their own name, offering to buy the property outright, or simply moving out and starting over.

A 50 year old house might not be so appealing to your children and their spouses anyway if you think about it.

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lifeisgood

Normally, there is a residency period where you need to be in country for a specific amount of time every year for a number of years. Is this not true in Philippines?

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Normally, there is a residency period where you need to be in country for a specific amount of time every year for a number of years. Is this not true in Philippines?

 

I think someone said you have to be there 5 straight years to at least qualify.

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lifeisgood

I think someone said you have to be there 5 straight years to at least qualify.

 

Yep, missed LazyDays post. Most routes to citzenship is set up like that which made me wonder.

Edited by lifeisgood
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The archives here have an excellent requirement list for this subject. The BI web page is also excellent

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Yep, missed LazyDays post. Most routes to citzenship is set up like that which made me wonder.

 

Well, most routes to citizenship require that you stay in the country a certain number of days within a certain time frame. For example Canada requires that a permanent resident must be physically in Canada 1095 days (the equivalent of 3 years) within 5 years (it could be longer, I'm only making that number up). So you can leave, and come back, but the amount of time you leave is deducted from the 1095 days. According to lazydays, (I'm assuming he's right) you must be in the Philippines 5 STRAIGHT years in order to be able to apply for citizenship. Not easy to be able to legally do in the Philippines.

 

With that said, its next to impossible to qualify to be a Filipino citizen. Their are also other rules about being involved in the community and other things that I can't recall off the top of my head that make it difficult. But think of it this way. There are hundreds of expats on this board alone that either live, or stay in the Philippines for extended periods of time. How many of them are, or are considering to become citizens?* I can't think of one, besides Guenther who has toyed with the idea. That tells me that a ) its very difficult to accomplish, and b ) the cons of becoming a citizen out weight the pros.

 

*If I'm wrong about this, I'm sorry, its just that I've never heard one poster here ever say, "Hey, I'm a Filipino citizen, and I wasn't born here, and neither of my parents are Filipinos"

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SkyMan

Smidsy - Your location has you in Oz and from my Google, Oz does allow dual citizenship.

 

The time rule is that you have to have lived in the Phils 10 years, but only 5 under certain circumstances like being married to a filipina. The Law (CA 473) states it as "resided in the Philippines for a continuous period of not less than ten years." (or five) but I have seen no stipulation that the leaving the country at any time negates this process. You can take trips outside the Phils and still 'reside' here.

 

The BI web page is also excellent
If the BI website was working.

That tells me that a ) its very difficult to accomplish, and b ) the cons of becoming a citizen out weight the pros.

Well, it's the Philippines so nothing is easy. But of the requirements, I don't see any particularly difficult. You mentioned community invoolvement, how hard is that? You don't have to build a bridge or donate a school to your town. Being a member of a church is community involvement.

The only cons I see are the costs to get through it. And the pros don't particularly outway that.

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Smidsy - Your location has you in Oz and from my Google, Oz does allow dual citizenship.

 

The time rule is that you have to have lived in the Phils 10 years, but only 5 under certain circumstances like being married to a filipina. The Law (CA 473) states it as "resided in the Philippines for a continuous period of not less than ten years." (or five) but I have seen no stipulation that the leaving the country at any time negates this process. You can take trips outside the Phils and still 'reside' here.

 

If the BI website was working.

Well, it's the Philippines so nothing is easy. But of the requirements, I don't see any particularly difficult. You mentioned community invoolvement, how hard is that? You don't have to build a bridge or donate a school to your town. Being a member of a church is community involvement.

The only cons I see are the costs to get through it. And the pros don't particularly outway that.

 

I don't wish to argue with you, since I don't have my facts, but I believe community involvement might be more than just being involved in a church group, and I believe that the costs are probably less prohibitive than the restrictions. There is a post here that Guenther was involved in that spells it all out. If I find it I will post it here. But as you said, I don't think the pros particularly outweigh the cons regardless of what they are. But I really don't think the cons are cost.

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You will also be informed that you must renounce your citizenship, but if you are a U.S. citizen, that is not true, as you would have to appear in person on U.S. soil, pay a fee of appx. $250.00 and be approved.

The U.S. prefers that you become a dual citizen rather than renouncing your citizenship even though the Philippine officials say that the U.S. will not allow dual citizenship (another lie).

Too many wealthy U.S. citizens have renounced their citizen-ships to avoid taxes and some try to do so when a pending felony charge is likely to be served on them.

 

The USA just doesn't recognize dual citizenship, if you are a US citizen then that's that as far as the US is concerned, with exceptions for proscribing (IIRC) certain foreign citizenships.

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softail

http://travel.state....s/cis_1753.html

 

US State Department Services Dual Nationality

 


  •  

 

The concept of dual nationality means that a person is a citizen of two countries at the same time. Each country has its own citizenship laws based on its own policy.Persons may have dual nationality by automatic operation of different laws rather than by choice. For example, a child born in a foreign country to U.S. citizen parents may be both a U.S. citizen and a citizen of the country of birth.

A U.S. citizen may acquire foreign citizenship by marriage, or a person naturalized as a U.S. citizen may not lose the citizenship of the country of birth.U.S. law does not mention dual nationality or require a person to choose one citizenship or another. Also, a person who is automatically granted another citizenship does not risk losing U.S. citizenship. However, a person who acquires a foreign citizenship by applying for it may lose U.S. citizenship. In order to lose U.S. citizenship, the law requires that the person must apply for the foreign citizenship voluntarily, by free choice, and with the intention to give up U.S. citizenship.

Intent can be shown by the person's statements or conduct.The U.S. Government recognizes that dual nationality exists but does not encourage it as a matter of policy because of the problems it may cause. Claims of other countries on dual national U.S. citizens may conflict with U.S. law, and dual nationality may limit U.S. Government efforts to assist citizens abroad. The country where a dual national is located generally has a stronger claim to that person's allegiance.

However, dual nationals owe allegiance to both the United States and the foreign country. They are required to obey the laws of both countries. Either country has the right to enforce its laws, particularly if the person later travels there.Most U.S. citizens, including dual nationals, must use a U.S. passport to enter and leave the United States. Dual nationals may also be required by the foreign country to use its passport to enter and leave that country. Use of the foreign passport does not endanger U.S. citizenship.Most countries permit a person to renounce or otherwise lose citizenship.

Information on losing foreign citizenship can be obtained from the foreign country's embassy and consulates in the United States. Americans can renounce U.S. citizenship in the proper form at U.S. embassies and consulates abroad.

 

It looks like duel citizenship is allowed but not encouraged.

 

 

Doug

Edited by softail
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RogerDuMond

We have researched this and discussed this at length in the past (check the archives), and you will not lose US citizenship by obtaining Philippine citizenship. Basically the only way to lose US citizenship in a matter like this is to go into the US Embassy and renounce your citizenship and they will try to talk you out of it. Both countries kind of ignore the fact that you are also a citizen of the other country. To me there are no benefits to becoming a citizen of the Philippines that are worth the hassle of the process.

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smokey

We have researched this and discussed this at length in the past (check the archives), and you will not lose US citizenship by obtaining Philippine citizenship. Basically the only way to lose US citizenship in a matter like this is to go into the US Embassy and renounce your citizenship and they will try to talk you out of it. Both countries kind of ignore the fact that you are also a citizen of the other country. To me there are no benefits to becoming a citizen of the Philippines that are worth the hassle of the process.

 

 

 

i wonder if a person comes to the us on a green card and leaves for over 6 months they CAN loose if but in most cases its one year gone ... i wonder if a person with an acr leaves for a year does he loose his acr

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