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royaldude

is it necessary to speak the local language

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tomaw

 

He is not totally wrong. The people in these kind of jobs deal with tourists all day. Of course they have to speak passable English but "everyone" does not speak fluent English.

.........Before my wife met me online she had a job in a factory assembling electronics. Most of her family and friends just have a high school diploma and jobs not dealing with the public if they have a job at all. They all spoke to me in very understandable if not fluent English. As I said, they start learning English in elementary school and all subjects are taught in English in PUBLIC high school.

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AaronTheTiger

.........Before my wife met me online she had a job in a factory assembling electronics. Most of her family and friends just have a high school diploma and jobs not dealing with the public if they have a job at all. They all spoke to me in very understandable if not fluent English. As I said, they start learning English in elementary school and all subjects are taught in English in PUBLIC high school.

 

Ive gone to private schools in cebu, those are english speaking.

 

Most public school speak cebuano and have an english class as well as a tagalog (national language) class. no the entire day is not taught in english.

 

But i agree that most people know english to some degree no matter where they are from, though most people who can speak a lot have had some degree of contact with foreigners in their past.

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Kim_

.........Before my wife met me online she had a job in a factory assembling electronics. Most of her family and friends just have a high school diploma and jobs not dealing with the public if they have a job at all. They all spoke to me in very understandable if not fluent English. As I said, they start learning English in elementary school and all subjects are taught in English in PUBLIC high school.

Also in my country of origin, english is mandatory. Do you think each and everyone knows how to actually use it a few years after school finished? My German was very good during the schooling years, now 30+ years later I can't speak it anymore.

Ich habe alles vergessen ;)

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Skywalker

Many years ago I had a Chinese friend in London, and when I used to correct his English, he would mumble something in Cantonese. When I asked him what he said, he answered that he'd thanked me for putting money in his pocket.

 

At least that is what he told me!

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udonthani

My German was very good during the schooling years, now 30+ years later I can't speak it anymore.

Ich habe alles vergessen ;)

 

mir auch. Wir sind beide dumm :)

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Curby

you got to pronounce each consonant and vowel as a syllable.

 

for example Talisay would be Ta-Lee-Sai.

my name Aaron would be A-A-Ron.

reciept isnt a common word, they use resibo, re-see-bo/re-see-vo

 

like you said it will take some time to get used to it, but if you break it down to each syllable you will have an easier time, break between each individual vowel base.

atta, would be at-ta

tatta, would be tat-ta

taat, would be ta-at

taa, would be ta-a

 

That's really helpful, Aaron! Thank you!

 

Once I'm in Cebu full time, I plan to learn Cebuano. I don't expect to get far, but basic words will help. More importantly for me, knowing more about their language will help me better understand their expectations and predilections for pronunciation and grammar in English.

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Headshot

Why wait. Order Bud Brown's course online and get started learning na!

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tomaw

 

 

Ive gone to private schools in cebu, those are english speaking.

 

Most public school speak cebuano and have an english class as well as a tagalog (national language) class. no the entire day is not taught in english.

 

But i agree that most people know english to some degree no matter where they are from, though most people who can speak a lot have had some degree of contact with foreigners in their past.

............... OK, so you think you know more than my wife who was born and raised in Cebu and went through elementary school and high school there.

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TorJay

My dad is bigger than your dad.

 

My wife knows more than your wife.

 

Let the wars begin.

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tomaw

Also in my country of origin, english is mandatory. Do you think each and everyone knows how to actually use it a few years after school finished? My German was very good during the schooling years, now 30+ years later I can't speak it anymore.

Ich habe alles vergessen ;)

..........Yes, I agree. If you don't use it you loose it. How manny Americans remember everything they learned in U.S. History or algebra. However we do use English and so do a lot of Philippinos that have occassions to use it.

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enoonmai

..........Yes, I agree. If you don't use it you loose it. How manny Americans remember everything they learned in U.S. History or algebra. However we do use English and so do a lot of Philippinos that have occassions to use it.

True, some even have the ability to write it without making spelling and grammar mistakes.

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AaronTheTiger

............... OK, so you think you know more than my wife who was born and raised in Cebu and went through elementary school and high school there.

 

well seeing as i have had a lot of employees over the years, and my interest in the bisayan/cebuano language and that i ask questions of the people who work for me. Most, let me say again, Most PUBLIC school do not teach each subject in english, but have an english class and tagalog class. now in Manila and maybe in cebu city they could be more prevelent to have more classes in english. my employees come from all over. Not a one has had a public high school teach each subject in english, but none have gone to school inside cebu city. though i had one employee from manila, he went to highschool in the 80's said that that was all english. maybe times have changed. but the employees i questioned are all from the late 90's to present.

 

sa based on your wife being one person, and me asking about 15 people. i think its safe to say that i have more substantial evidence.

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AB2000

Just asked my fiance (who is not from Manila or Cebu)...she said all subjects were in english, except history and Filipino. So there's a data point for you.

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AaronTheTiger

Just asked my fiance (who is not from Manila or Cebu)...she said all subjects were in english, except history and Filipino. So there's a data point for you.

 

i see, when i asked my employees again, they didnt understand me. the teachers are suppose to speak english and tagalog. but they said the teacher will almost always explain it over in the local dialect of the area. so i guess the standard is english and tagalog. they also said that english was not as prevalent at tagalog as more people could understand tagalog being spoken to once.

 

i guess when it comes from school to school and area to area maybe things are handled differently, Baleno high school in masbate teaches mostly in tagalog and the masbate visayan, but they said the teachers spoke in english also.

 

my employee from mindanao said it was a mixture of tagalog and visayan, english being the only class english was spoken in.

 

i believe your wife as well, maybe it just depends on the area.

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AB2000

 

i believe your wife as well, maybe it just depends on the area.

Yep, definitely not refuting your experience, and it likely is dependent on the area and/or the school. Also, I don't claim my experience to be typical, it is just my limited experience. My fiance is from a lower class family (farmers in Samar), but most of her acquaintances I would call middle to upper middle class.

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