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royaldude

is it necessary to speak the local language

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Blackpudlian

 

Come to think of it I can't remember the last time a Cebuano thanked me either.

 

Strange...Ive never been thanked by a Filipino

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Guy60417

Royaldude: If I might be so rude as to return to the original topic, I think you have received the answer to your question -- it is not necessary to know Visayan to live here. Though I have seen some argument over why you should learn Spanish to live in Spain, that was not the topic. And there are numerous statements that it is helpful and/or polite to learn Visayan, which is probably true. But no one that I have noticed has yet come up with an argument for why you would NEED Cebuano to get along here.

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SkyMan

is it necessary to speak the local language

If you were an illegal in the US I would say absolutely so it would be hypocritical of me to answer otherwise in the RP.

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Headshot

If you were an illegal in the US I would say absolutely so it would be hypocritical of me to answer otherwise in the RP.

 

Well, if you were coming here to work (like the illegals going to the US are), then I would say it is pretty much mandatory that you gain at least a working knowledge of the language (can carry on a conversation). If you are here to retire...or here as a tourist, and have no intention of working here, then I would say that learning the language is only necessary to the degree that 'not knowing what is being said around you' bothers you. If you are perfectly comfortable with that, then you can probably get by with just speaking and understanding English. If you are less than comfotable not unstanding what others are saying...or you automatically assume they are talking about you...then you should buy Bud's program and learn at least some Cebuano. Even in the US, we don't expect tourists to be able to speak and understand our language perfectly.

Edited by Headshot
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musicman666

I quite often get the jist of a conversation simply because cebauno doesn't have the vocabulary to deal with the modern world....they just pepper it with tons of English words to the point that I can just jump in and comment because I know what they are talking about....it always surprises them when I do that since they don't even realise that they are talking in a dual language.

Edited by musicman666
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AB2000

Is it necessary? No.

 

My experience is this: I can communicate to most of my fiances family, some better than others (surprisingly, her grandmother is very fluent in english).

 

In my fiances circle of friends, they are all good english speakers. My fiance herself is excellent, including idiomatic English expressions...there has been very little that she has not understood of what I have ever said to her.

 

Knowing a little of her dialect (Waray Waray) is very much appreciated and surprises most people when I use it. While over at her friends place, a "learn English" for children DVD was playing in the room with her very young child. The nanny got a kick out of it when I was saying the Waray words for the things that were being presented on the video.

 

Of course out and about in the public, English comprehension varies, but it is generally good enough to get around.

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broden

not necessary but helpful yes

 

there's a lot to what musicman said ..

I quite often get the jist of a conversation simply because cebauno doesn't have the vocabulary to deal with the modern world....they just pepper it with tons of English words to the point that I can just jump in and comment because I know what they are talking about....it always surprises them when I do that since they don't even realise that they are talking in a dual language.

 

 

you will pick up things here and there .. i'm so use to hearing my wife speak even when she doesn't use any english words i generally know what she's talking about .. even have corrected her at times over the years over some point of some story she was relating to someone.. which we don't notice but it surprises other people

 

 

 

 

oh and the more money you are willing to throw around the less knowing the local language will matter :lol:

 

 

 

but really you can get by fine especially if you're just talking vacation even extended

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tomaw

 

 

no it isn't. A tiny tiny number of Filipinos speak English as like an affectation, but these are just a bunch of pretentious prats basically and are seen as such by other well-off Filipinos.

 

Even high class Filipinos that work in the law, and who use English as part of their job (though more in written than spoken form), will almost never use English in their day to day communication. The lingua franca of the Philippines is not English, but Tagalog.

.............. Sorry, but you are totally wrong. I was in the Philippines 3 times. Everywhere we went everyone spoke to me in fluent English: cab drivers, baggage handlers, waiters in fine dinning, fast food, etc. My wife and her two sisters speak fluent English. They are not a rich family and only graduated public high school. The Philippine students start learning English in elementary school. Once in high school all subjects are taught in English.

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stevehann

One of the reasons that I didn't hesitate to move here was that there was no need to speak any language other than English. The Subdivision Guards don't speak much English, but my wife and helpers do, and outside of school hours, my children can translate for me. Prices are generally marked and I do pretty well just on English. Yes, it would be nice to speak a little local dialect, but I see no need for it.

 

Also, Visayan is spoken only around here. If I had retired where the local language was German, French, Spanish, Arabic, or Mandarin, I would spend some time with it. But I can't get excited about local languages.

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iam

I'm an American, I barely speak english! I wouldn't hesitate to mangle someone elses language, with apologies of course, because more than likely it would be hilarious, possibly appreciated that I made an effort, and everyone can use a good laugh now and then.

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Mang Kanor

sometimes you come across aspiring families that want their children to get a solid grounding in English language as part of their education and they might insist on English being spoken in the home, especially at key times like mealtimes.

 

but these can come from almost any social class, not just upper class. They can also come from any other country. I've come across Malaysian families that can speak English at mealtimes, around the table. The idea is, it assists with the education of the kids, to speak in a foreign language, while they're having dinner.

 

but these are very much the exception and to most other people, this is seen as very much an affectation. Maybe a bit commendable and worthy, but rather pretentious.

 

In their private lives Filipinos almost never speak English, however well educated or rich they are, and even if they have a high powered job like judge in a court of law, that involves use of English language in their work.

 

 

honestly not kidding - I've met a number of families who encourage the children, to speak Tagalog in the house, or at least around the dinner table,

 

 

so which is which Mr. Whippy?

 

make up your mind...

 

anyway my take to OP's question is...

 

it is not necessary to learn the language but its helpful when trying to know what people are saying in front of you.

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enoonmai
Sorry, but you are totally wrong. I was in the Philippines 3 times. Everywhere we went everyone spoke to me in fluent English: cab drivers, baggage handlers, waiters in fine dinning, fast food, etc.

He is not totally wrong. The people in these kind of jobs deal with tourists all day. Of course they have to speak passable English but "everyone" does not speak fluent English.

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Davaoeno
I was in the Philippines 3 times. Everywhere we went everyone spoke to me in fluent English:

 

 

I went to the usa several times and everywhere we went many people did not speak fluent English [ only Amurican ]

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udonthani

ok. Here is a list, of people in the Philippines that speak English language every day i.e. on a daily everyday basis.

 

1. work or education related

 

these can be in education, or working as lawyers in court, or possibly working in the media, and broadcasting on English language television or radio. They could be working in tourism and have to converse with the customers using English as a lingua franca. These tourism people, will speak in English with somebody from Hokkaido almost as much, as they will if they're from Hawaii. English has been successful as a language and it is now a lingua franca in Asia. Many Filipinos also work in call centers. But English is not their language. It is just a work language they speak, to make a living.

 

2. Aspirant parents.

 

sometimes parents develop the belief that English should be spoken in the home, as much as possible.

 

3. Affectation.

 

a tiny rich Filipino elite speaks English more than other Filipinos, but this means nothing. It's only like rich Arabs with education in the Middle East, liking and thinking it is desirable, to speak French, which they do. This gives them a toehold on the Mediterreanean, like Filipinos that speak English think it gives them a toehold on the west.

 

4. Filipinos in relationships with foreigners.

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SkyMan
Even in the US, we don't expect tourists to be able to speak and understand our language perfectly.
No but we expect residents to.

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