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royaldude

is it necessary to speak the local language

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ckfm

More important is the attitude, many filipinos are such a sensitive bunch of people, they will appriciate it a lot more if you respect them rather than being arrogant and being able to speak some ( wrong pronounced) words.

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Mr.T

i think your answer is an ignorant and wrong answer.it will definataly be a help if you can understand and speak a bit of the language of the country that you live in .

 

It will be helpful but it's not necessary

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towboat72

It will be helpful but it's not necessary

 

what did i just say ????????

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udonthani

english is the language of the upper class.

 

no it isn't. A tiny tiny number of Filipinos speak English as like an affectation, but these are just a bunch of pretentious prats basically and are seen as such by other well-off Filipinos.

 

Even high class Filipinos that work in the law, and who use English as part of their job (though more in written than spoken form), will almost never use English in their day to day communication. The lingua franca of the Philippines is not English, but Tagalog.

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ckfm

no it isn't. A tiny tiny number of Filipinos speak English as like an affectation, but these are just a bunch of pretentious prats basically and are seen as such by other well-off Filipinos.

 

Even high class Filipinos that work in the law, and who use English as part of their job (though more in written than spoken form), will almost never use English in their day to day communication. The lingua franca of the Philippines is not English, but Tagalog.

 

I am sure you know.

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ckfm

no it isn't. A tiny tiny number of Filipinos speak English as like an affectation, but these are just a bunch of pretentious prats basically and are seen as such by other well-off Filipinos.

 

Even high class Filipinos that work in the law, and who use English as part of their job (though more in written than spoken form), will almost never use English in their day to day communication. The lingua franca of the Philippines is not English, but Tagalog.

 

English is the only language used and allowed in jurisdiction FIY, both written and spoken. In day to day communication a mix is used, also called taglish, a mix of English and Tagalog.

 

 

Honestly, you don't know what you are taking about.

 

The "lingua franca" in the Philippines is Tagalog as you mention because it is taught in school before English and (more important) spoken on TV. It is the first language of the Philippines, a love hate.

Edited by ckfm

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udonthani

sometimes you come across aspiring families that want their children to get a solid grounding in English language as part of their education and they might insist on English being spoken in the home, especially at key times like mealtimes.

 

but these can come from almost any social class, not just upper class. They can also come from any other country. I've come across Malaysian families that can speak English at mealtimes, around the table. The idea is, it assists with the education of the kids, to speak in a foreign language, while they're having dinner.

 

but these are very much the exception and to most other people, this is seen as very much an affectation. Maybe a bit commendable and worthy, but rather pretentious.

 

In their private lives Filipinos almost never speak English, however well educated or rich they are, and even if they have a high powered job like judge in a court of law, that involves use of English language in their work.

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Mr.T

In their private lives Filipinos almost never speak English, however well educated or rich they are, and even if they have a high powered job like judge in a court of law, that involves use of English language in their work.

 

Bullshit. They do speak English in their private lifes. I have yet to come across a Filipino who would refuse to speak English with me.

Edited by Mr.T

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RogerDuMond

English and Tagalog are the 2 official languages of the Philippines, but more people speak one of the Visayan dialects than Tagalog in everyday life.

 

It is not necessary to know the dialect where you are living, but you are living in their country. Any attempt at adaptation is appreciated.

 

Lets also stay away from personal attacks and stay on topic please.

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Stranded Shipscook

Actually and in my observation Mr.T is correct in his statements,that (some) Families often use English purposely.

 

My observations are based upon the upper-middle class guests in my Restaurant, which often talk with their small children and encourage them to use English also. ( and it has nothing to do with me, as they don't see me, i just hear it. )

In some wealthier families the use of English is so widespread, that one hardly hear any local lingo by them, except when communicating with their Household employees.

 

The same observation by Udonthani is also correct that some Families speak exclusively the local lingo,even when they could speak fluent English.It a matter of choice i guess.

 

In poorer families however the families naturally speak only local lingos.

Edited by Stranded Shipscook

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udonthani

They do speak English in their private lifes. I have yet to come across a Filipino who would refuse to speak English with me.

 

Filipinos almost never speak English WITH EACH OTHER.

 

of course they speak English with us, foreigners, as it is the most readily available lingua franca. Even in court, where English is supposed to the the official language, most communication takes place in a Filipino language, usually Tagalog.

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Mr.T

Filipinos almost never speak English WITH EACH OTHER.

 

of course they speak English with us, foreigners, as it is the most readily available lingua franca. Even in court, where English is supposed to the the official language, most communication takes place in a Filipino language, usually Tagalog.

 

They do speak English with eachother, I've heard it many times. Even when they come from a different part of the country, and one refuses to speak Tagalog, they will just speak English.

 

You, who pretends to know everything, should've known that.

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udonthani

In poorer families however the families naturally speak only local lingos.

 

it's not only rich families that encourage their kids to speak English. Plenty of poorer parents do as well, if they can speak English themselves well, i.e. maybe they work in tourism, or they are a teacher and who have better than average command of English.

 

sometimes this influence can be quite strong. I had a Chinese Malaysian girlfriend once, not from a really rich background, just kind of middle class, whose parents were both teachers, and who had good English. They spoke English in the home to the extent that she told me her English was better than any other language she knew, even the Tagalog of Malaysia, Malay. She'd struggled to pass the Malay language exam, that is essential to get your basic high school diploma. English, she just breezed through. And at university. everything was in English. Then after graduation as an adult, she got a job working on an English language publication in KL, where the language in the office was English. But these kind of cases are very rare.

Edited by udonthani

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batman2525
People do appreciate it if you can at least thank them in their language.

 

Strange...Ive never been thanked by a Filipino.

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Blackpudlian

As an english man,(Lancashire) I find it Very difficult to live here, only knowing a few local words, (which is my fault I know) out of my wife's whole family, only her younger sister speaks any basic English, ( so family gatherings aren't much fun for me) I find that most locals that do speak a bit of English can't understand me even if I speak very slow, I have to put on an awful rhotic American accent for them to understand, so to say that there are lots of cebuanos that speak English is over simplyfying it, you should say speak American English ,this was after all Americas only colony. I used to live and work in Batangas and manila and never had a problem with the locals understanding my English, it must be unique to the visayas.

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