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SkyMan

Elevated Water Tank and Tower Design

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miles-high

Why not "kill two birds with one stone" and make it a solar-heated water tank for your hot bath? ;)

 

http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/solar-water-heaters

Edited by miles-high

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Doromaner

You're very welcome. I would use a larger battery though. A 7AH battery won't last long., as a Shurflo pump draws 4 amps an hour at unrestricted flow, and 7 amps with a restricted flow (like when a faucet is opened only partially). A 7AH battery might give you 45 minutes of water pumping time before the voltage drops too low for the pump to effectively work.  I would go for 100 AH battery (12 volts) or something close to it. An electric battery charger can be had locally too. It will keep the battery charged up as long as it's plugged in. This route will keep your costs down, and your reliability factor up.

 

A solar panel would be good too, but a 10 watt panel will not keep a decent sized battery charged as it does not put out a high enough voltage for the most part. A 100 watt panel would be the smallest I would go with if you want to use a solar panel, but this will dramatically increase the price of the system. Up to you which way you want to go. 

Yeah, I new the 7ah would only give an hour maybe during the night, but my thinking was it would be consistently recharging through the day so if you used the bulk of your water during the day it might be ok. Or maybe buy 2 of the 7ah batteries. This would obviously be for a house with very modest water requirements but it I think it could work.

 

The other option of buying a larger battery and a charger that plugs in is also a very smart plan. You could go a few days with no electric and still have plenty of water.

 

Does anybody know if the Shurflo pumps can be found in the Phills?

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Doromaner

 

 

 

 

16 mm rebar is 319.00 Pesos for a 6 meter length..

Average price for cement around 225 a bag.

Gravel and sand about 1.200 Per cubic meter.

 

We will probably need to build our tower 10 meters high.. I`ll let you know the cost when its done.

Yeah, let us know.

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Knowdafish

Yeah, I new the 7ah would only give an hour maybe during the night, but my thinking was it would be consistently recharging through the day so if you used the bulk of your water during the day it might be ok. Or maybe buy 2 of the 7ah batteries. This would obviously be for a house with very modest water requirements but it I think it could work.

 

The other option of buying a larger battery and a charger that plugs in is also a very smart plan. You could go a few days with no electric and still have plenty of water.

 

Does anybody know if the Shurflo pumps can be found in the Phills?

 

It looks as though you might be in luck - http://jismar.yocal.ph/food_equipments/shurflo%C2%AE_premium_plus_pump+metro_manila+quezon_city+philippines-22643.html

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Knowdafish

Awesome! After this thread they will probably sell 10 of them.

I need to ask for a commission!  :lol:

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Headshot

No, but they do make make them so the pump doesn't cycle on and off so much. 

 

http://legacy.shurflo.com/pages/Food_Service/beverage/accumulator_tanks/tanks.html

 

One is not necessary though, as these pumps can even run dry for extended periods of time with no damage. Replacement parts are available too, so they can be rebuilt indefinitely. I've seen these pumps still working great after being 20 years old. 

 

Typical R.V. pump, tank, accumulator, plumbing installation in an R.V. The same would easily work in a house. The switch for the pump could be left on all the time, as the pump will only come on when it's pressure switch tells it too (demand pump). Again, the accumulator/"pressure tank" is unnecessary. Most RV's don't have one. 

 

ShurfloTankPump.jpg

 

If that isn't a pressure tank just downstream from the pump, then what is it? It certainly looks like a pressure tank to me. Even if it isn't absolutely necessary, the manufacturer is obviously recommending it since they included it in their schematic.

Edited by Headshot

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SkyMan

Even though we have a water tower, along with a 750 liter storage tank (stainless steel), the water pressure here is not nearly as good

How tall is the tower you have? Shower head to water level in the tank.

as good as it was at my previous apartment. (There were two 1,500 liter water tanks on the roof of the three story building. They were about 12 meters up.) The pressure there was great.

You were on the first floor, right?

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Paul

How tall is the tower you have? Shower head to water level in the tank.

 

Um, I don't honestly know. It isn't that high, to be honest. Let me go outside and see if I Can estimate it.

 

 

You were on the first floor, right?

 

Yeah, ground level of a three floor building. There are two rooms on the roof. One is for storage; the other made into a bathroom. The water tanks are on top of those two rooms, one on either side of the structure. 1,500 liters each. I assume they are tied in together, the two tanks.

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Paul

The base of the tank is probably 6 meters up. The problem is, this is from the ground, the base of the tower. The home is actually a meter above the ground, and then the shower head, almost two meters above that height. So, my water pressure, at the shower, is based only from a difference of about three meters, I estimate. So, 10 feet is what we are talking here.

 

I guess the best solution for me, since I do not own this home, would be to put a pump inline to give me the pressure I want / need.

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Paul

If that isn't a pressure tank just downstream from the pump, then what is it? It certainly looks like a pressure tank to me. Even if it isn't absolutely necessary, the manufacturer is obviously recommending it since they included it in their schematic.

 

That is a tank, a bladder tank. I didn't have one in my 31' tagalong travel trailer. I only had the pump and storage tank.

 

Oh, Headshot, I stand corrected. That is an accumulator tank. It works similarly to a pressure tank. It has a bladder in it that one would pressurize up to about 30psi.  

Edited by Paul

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Knowdafish

If that isn't a pressure tank just downstream from the pump, then what is it? It certainly looks like a pressure tank to me. Even if it isn't absolutely necessary, the manufacturer is obviously recommending it since they included it in their schematic.

It is, what the manufacturer calls an accumulator, but yes, most people would call it a pressure tank. It is not necessary, and most  R.V.'s don't have one (in excess of 95%!). They are a relatively new item by Shurflo, and another way for them to sell you something and make $$. You can disagree all you like, but I worked on R.V.'s for over 20 years and I think I know what I am talking about. The accumulators main purpose is to smooth out the flow when a faucet is barely cracked open. It keeps the pump from rapidly cycling on and off, that is it's whole purpose. Heck, it only holds 24 ounces / .7 liters! 

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miles-high

The accumulators main purpose is to smooth out the flow when a faucet is barely cracked open.

 

That is also true but the main purpose of the accumulator is to prevent pressure wave (a.k.a. water or fluid hammer) which may destroy the pipelines, particularly if your motorhome (RV) has a washing machine and/or dishwasher installed.

 

The accumulators are also found on airplanes with any fluid systems, in particular, the hydraulic system to prevent pressure wave as well as to assist short burst, high demand on the system, for example, at the onset of the landing gear extension…

Edited by miles-high

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Knowdafish

That is also true but the main purpose of the accumulator is to prevent pressure wave (a.k.a. water or fluid hammer) which may destroy the pipelines, particularly if your motorhome (RV) has a washing machine and/or dishwasher installed.

 

The accumulators are also found on airplanes with any fluid systems, in particular, the hydraulic system to prevent pressure wave as well as to assist short burst, high demand on the system, for example, at the onset of the landing gear extension…

A pressure wave destroying pipelines in an R.V.?

 

#1 - It's never going to happen, as most R.V.'s use polybutylene or polyethylene tubing which is extremely strong. You can freeze either one solid, and the fittings may crack and leak, but the lines don't. I've never seen a copper line, CPVC, or galvanized pipe break either because of water hammering in an R.V. R.V.s aren't jet aircraft, so the comparison is weak.

 

#2 - If you look at the location of the accumulator in the Shurflo diagram, it is after the pump, but before the t fitting for the city water inlet. (The city water inlet isn't even shown) In this location it may prevent water hammering when using the pump, but it will have a negligible effect using city water.

 

#3 - I installed one in my motorhome. The thing I did like about it was that you could get up in the middle of the night, use the toilet (low flow/water saver R.V. toilet), and the pump would not come on if you only flushed once. This was worth it. The noise of the pump, in a completely quiet motorhome would often wake other people up. As far as it reducing "water hammering". It didn't, but I never had any (as most R.V's don't) to begin with. 

 

Sorry for the tangent.

 

Back to elevated water tanks and tower design, for those that wish to go that route. 

Edited by Knowdafish

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Paul

You aren't off topic. The idea of a pressure pump installed, even in the construction of a water tower, can be an important part of the water system.

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