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SkyMan

Elevated Water Tank and Tower Design

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Paul

I just don't like the idea of having no water if the power is out. I can always cook with coal in an emergency, but water is a necessity.

 

You guys should google TREADLE PUMPS. You can buy one out of China or India for around $50. No electricity needed for lots of lift. Particularly useful in the provinces.

 

Well, you still haven't answered my question. Are you sure the water pressure is high enough to fill a tank 5 or 6 meters off the ground? 

 

And, again, a single solar panel, small controller, and one battery, would provide enough power to run a small pump to push the water into the house from an on ground tank. For the money you are considering putting into a tower, you could go that route instead. 

 

If you really wish to be off grid more, all you have to do is expand that idea, and you could power the entire home, if necessary. Then, you could tell mains power to feck off. :)

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Headed that way

Heck, put the tank on a nearby hill if there is one.  Or even better, pump the water out of the ground on  the hill if possible and let gravity do it's thing.

 

Look up a troupe, did I spell that right?  If you have a running stream you can pump water for free.

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Paul

I just don't like the idea of having no water if the power is out. I can always cook with coal in an emergency, but water is a necessity.

 

You guys should google TREADLE PUMPS. You can buy one out of China or India for around $50. No electricity needed for lots of lift. Particularly useful in the provinces.

 

I have done a bit of research on them in the past, treadle pumps. I haven't really thought much, though, about putting them into actual use for pumping water for a dwelling.

 

In most provincial areas, Filipinos will have a community pump, much like the one pictured below:

 

water_pump.jpg

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Doromaner

Well, you still haven't answered my question. Are you sure the water pressure is high enough to fill a tank 5 or 6 meters off the ground? 

 

And, again, a single solar panel, small controller, and one battery, would provide enough power to run a small pump to push the water into the house from an on ground tank. For the money you are considering putting into a tower, you could go that route instead. 

 

If you really wish to be off grid more, all you have to do is expand that idea, and you could power the entire home, if necessary. Then, you could tell mains power to feck off. :)

The water will need a pump to get it to the elevated tank. I will likely use a treadle pump that uses leg power.

 

I am quite knowledgeable on solar and may very well go that way with my entire home, but with the cost of solar and the crappy state of current battery technology if I do go solar I will do it in a very modest way. Pumps happen to be pretty large consumers of power. My home will use less than 2500 Kilo Watt Hours per day. So max I would need would be a 1000 watt array.

 

My original plan was to get the solar system right away, but I still am waiting for the prices to come down a little further. I also think that better battery technology may be available soon. The batteries are the weak link in solar right now.

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Doromaner

I have done a bit of research on them in the past, treadle pumps. I haven't really thought much, though, about putting them into actual use for pumping water for a dwelling.

 

In most provincial areas, Filipinos will have a community pump, much like the one pictured below:

 

attachicon.gifwater_pump.jpg

If a treadle pump was use instead of that hand pump the water could easily be moved great distances with substantial lift capabilities. They are used widely in India, but the Phills have not caught on.

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Paul

Okay. If the tank is going to need a pump to fill it anyway, why not do away with batteries, and make a system (for pumping water) a lot cheaper? 

 

solar-pump-layout.jpg

 

You could run the pump off solar during the day to fill the tank, and then let gravity feed it into the home at night. Surely you would not use 750 liters over night. Your wife, or helper, would wash clothes, bath the kids, and do all cleaning with water during the day. So, I am sure that would supply ample water for the home. 



If a treadle pump was use instead of that hand pump the water could easily be moved great distances with substantial lift capabilities. They are used widely in India, but the Phills have not caught on.

 

Fair enough. But, unless you are going to be the one who is jogging on the treadle pump, you may have a hard time getting family members to do it. Filipino males are not known for their energy around the home. 

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Doromaner

Okay. If the tank is going to need a pump to fill it anyway, why not do away with batteries, and make a system (for pumping water) a lot cheaper? 

 

attachicon.gifsolar-pump-layout.jpg

 

You could run the pump off solar during the day to fill the tank, and then let gravity feed it into the home at night. Surely you would not use 750 liters over night. Your wife, or helper, would wash clothes, bath the kids, and do all cleaning with water during the day. So, I am sure that would supply ample water for the home. 

 

 

Fair enough. But, unless you are going to be the one who is jogging on the treadle pump, you may have a hard time getting family members to do it. Filipino males are not known for their energy around the home.

 

That is an interesting diagram, where did you get that from? What type of control unit would that be, and where would it be purchased?

Edited by Paul
removed duplicated quoted text.

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Paul

 

That is an interesting diagram, where did you get that from? What type of control unit would that be, and where would it be purchased?

 

Who knows, now?  I have been compiling solar, wind, water, and other alternative energy files for a long time. 

 

The controller would simply be a standard solar controller, similar to this one: 

 

This happens to be a MorningStar Solar Controller.

sunsaver_controller.jpg

 

But, in all honesty, and dependent upon the output voltage of the array, as well as the input voltage range of the pump, you may not even need a controller. As the sun rises, the voltage increases from the panel(s), and the pump starts pumping. As the sun sets, the pump starts to slow down. Fuse protection, I imagine, would all you would need. You can ask on solar forums, though, to make sure that is correct. I do not claim to be an expert on this, only an enthusiast. 

Edited by Paul
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Paul

where did you get that from?

 

It appears as though the image originated here: 

 

http://www.picosol.org/cambodia/en/technology/solar-pump/103-system-lay-out

 

I didn't take it from there, though. That is my first time visiting that page, as far as I can remember.

Edited by Paul

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Kaku

As has already been stated you will need a pump to get the water into your tank in the first place.  If the tank is topped off, how long will it last before you drain the tank?  If the power is only out for a few hours, you may have more than enough water in the tank to last you thru the "dry" spell.   It might be worth while to have a slightly larger tank than you had originally planned. 

 

An added advantage of having your own water tower is that you still have water available even when the local water system is down.

Edited by Kaku
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tom_shor

 

Another alternative is to use an electric pump to create the pressure rather than building a tower. more cost effective IMO

 

Unless the power goes out.

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Doromaner

Who knows, now?  I have been compiling solar, wind, water, and other alternative energy files for a long time. 

 

The controller would simply be a standard solar controller, similar to this one: 

 

This happens to be a MorningStar Solar Controller.

attachicon.gifsunsaver_controller.jpg

 

But, in all honesty, and dependent upon the output voltage of the array, as well as the input voltage range of the pump, you may not even need a controller. As the sun rises, the voltage increases from the panel(s), and the pump starts pumping. As the sun sets, the pump starts to slow down. Fuse protection, I imagine, would all you would need. You can ask on solar forums, though, to make sure that is correct. I do not claim to be an expert on this, only an enthusiast. 

I think the controller they are showing in the diagram may be like this one.

 

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200332017_200332017?cm_mmc=Google-pla-_-Water%20Pumps-_-Water%20Pump%20Accessories-_-109801&ci_src=17588969&ci_sku=109801&gclid=CKe7xsTU7bcCFeNj7AodKHIAHQ

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Paul

 

I didn't think of the load side of the solar controller. There again, I wasn't sure, as I have not explored that far into solar water pumping.

 

I'm glad you found that, though. 

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thebob

To answer the OP. I'd guess digging footings,concrete, welding, steel, paint, pipe, unions, non return valves, cocks, access ladder, manual pump. Somewhere from 50- 80k.

 

Small windmill would be an ideal application to run a mechanical pump.

Edited by thebob
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CebuKano

Getting back to the tower itself...Didn't Skyman construct a tower a few months ago? I did a search but didn't find the thread but I believe he was asking for a blueprint for a tower and he planned on doing the welding/labor himself..., I may be mistaken though... Might have been another member. I know that here in Mandaue I use recycled steel for outside steps, etc from the junkyard and the price is a fraction of "new". Remember that "new" over here is often not "new" anyway :) Since labor here is dirt cheap compared with other countries I have someone sand the steel and primer the hell out of it with "red-lead" and then coat it with good paint. It's the same difference as "new" imo. Just a suggestion.

 

Labor rates here in the city (last time I checked):

 

-Pesos-

300/day - laborer

400-500/day - welder (if you are lucky you might find one that has his own machine, it's worth it to pay a few more pesos to have him use his own set, imo).

Edited by Motörhead

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