Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Slayer

What Is Best Sub-Floor Material To Use Upstairs?

Recommended Posts

Slayer

Greetings,

What is the best sub-floor to use for the upstairs of the house? It seems strange if we use plywood when we work so hard to avoid wood everywhere else using metal c-purlines, etc. Looks like tile downstairs and was going to go with wood floor planks upstairs, but now looking at vinyl floor planks that look like wood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Davaoeno

Greetings,

What is the best sub-floor to use for the upstairs of the house? It seems strange if we use plywood when we work so hard to avoid wood everywhere else using metal c-purlines, etc. Looks like tile downstairs and was going to go with wood floor planks upstairs, but now looking at vinyl floor planks that look like wood.

 

I have the fake wood flooring [ imported from Germany and NOT cheap] . I do not particularly like the look, altho it is very popular here. If you do buy it make sure to buy extra since it is very hard to match later. Also, make sure it doesnt get wet because it bubbles up when it does. Many middle price houses here use ceramic tile or granite [ fake] everywhere.

If I was building a fairly costly house I would look into using the new bamboo flooring . Here are 2 pics of bamboo flooring

 

 

 

 

[ btw - I appreciate you titled this thread sub-floor material but then you started talking about flooring so I answered about that part ]

post-8045-0-75979700-1343000114_thumb.jpg

post-8045-0-15410300-1343000134_thumb.jpg

Edited by Davaoeno
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cuda

Greetings,

What is the best sub-floor to use for the upstairs of the house? It seems strange if we use plywood when we work so hard to avoid wood everywhere else using metal c-purlines, etc. Looks like tile downstairs and was going to go with wood floor planks upstairs, but now looking at vinyl floor planks that look like wood.

 

I am guessing that you have used metal floor trusses 2 feet apart.If that is the case vinyl planks would work well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Davaoeno

I am guessing that you have used metal floor trusses 2 feet apart.If that is the case vinyl planks would work well.

 

 

I seem to be missing something here. The vinyl floor planks that I believe Slayer is talking about are very thin and could never support any weight- nor are they meant to . [ i would refer to them as tiles rather than planks] . I put in a plywood floor before I installed the vinyl floor planks/tiles . [ they come 10 in a box from germany and cost about 1000-1300 pesos a box ]

 

And if you are talking about using planks over metal floor trusses why would you want to try and find vinyl ones ? In fact i have never seen vinyl planks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cuda

 

 

And if you are talking about using planks over metal floor trusses why would you want to try and find vinyl ones ? In fact i have never seen vinyl planks.

 

Because he doesn't want any wood. They are readily available in US mainly in the 2"x6" size . I would personally just pour concrete on the second floor.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thebob

It is really difficult to make a suggestion without knowing the design. We have rough estimates of your steel uprights but without knowing the section we can't calculate the load per square meter to even make an informed guess.

 

I'm going to hazard a guess at steel truss being the best system, purely because you have all of the skills and equipment for it on site.

 

Isn't it a bit late to be designing this now?

 

(Oops I'm not sure if you are the guy who has poured the floating slab on a grade or not.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stranded Shipscook

Greetings,

What is the best sub-floor to use for the upstairs of the house? It seems strange if we use plywood when we work so hard to avoid wood everywhere else using metal c-purlines, etc. Looks like tile downstairs and was going to go with wood floor planks upstairs, but now looking at vinyl floor planks that look like wood.

I assume you have not yet build the house ? because if, then one should have a close look at the plans and the weight which can be supported.

if you are still in the planing process- personally i still go with the solid concrete solution and ceramic tiles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RogerDat

Greetings,

What is the best sub-floor to use for the upstairs of the house? It seems strange if we use plywood when we work so hard to avoid wood everywhere else using metal c-purlines, etc. Looks like tile downstairs and was going to go with wood floor planks upstairs, but now looking at vinyl floor planks that look like wood.

If its possiable for you to say where you live it would be helpful, IF you live in Philippines, WHAT BUT wood will you use as roll formed steel will not support a cement floor on second floor. They normally use OSB in U.S. but I think that is scarce in Philippines. There is a steel decking available, but I do not know how confortable it would be with available coverings here in PI.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
USCebuana

Our old house built about 25 years ago had t & g wood flooring over 2 x 6 joists @ 2' o.c.. The beams were 12' apart. It looked really nice especially after it is waxed and scrubbed.

 

I think most houses there now have concrete floors on the first and second floors. They finish it with tiles or laminate flooring.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

My second floor will have steel (zigzag) trusses on two-foot centers with two layers of 3/4" hardiflex staggered (so no seams line up), glued and screwed. All joints (at least in one direction) will be over trusses. On top of that surface, we will put ceramic tile at a 45 degree angle. The floor will have the strength of concrete without the weight. Therefore, there will be no wood in the floor, and no temptation for any critters. It is also safer in an earthquake, since there is far less weight, and a far higher strength-to-weight ratio than in a normal concrete floor.

Edited by Headshot
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stranded Shipscook

My second floor will have steel (zigzag) trusses on two-foot centers with two layers of 3/4" hardiflex staggered (so no seams line up), glued and screwed. All joints (at least in one direction) will be over trusses. On top of that surface, we will put ceramic tile at a 45 degree angle. The floor will have the strength of concrete without the weight. Therefore, there will be no wood in the floor, and no temptation for any critters. It is also safer in an earthquake, since there is far less weight, and a far higher strength-to-weight ratio than in a normal concrete floor.

How about the costs? Are they "competitive" to the standard (concreting) solutions ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mr.T

Why not use tiles?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wombat No More

I think 2' apart for the floor trusses is fine if you are using 3/4" to 1" boards. Anyway, you ask about subflooring so I guess you really might mean, what to put under the vinyl planks to support it all. You could go with Hardie cement sheets. I've used 1/2" sheets with the same thickness aprox, ceramic tiles for my kitchen bench tops. I reckon you could drive a car over it and it wouldn't break.

 

Another point, perhaps not in line with what you will do. The "squeaky floorboards" syndrome can be prevented from happening by applying a flexible product, like silicon, bitumen even, to all the truss surfaces that will come into contact with the sub flooring etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

How about the costs? Are they "competitive" to the standard (concreting) solutions ?

 

I wouldn't put the "standard" Filipino concrete solution over my family's heads...so cost isn't really the primary issue for me. However, I am hoping my architect gets me the cost estimates soon so I know pretty much what I will be spending (not just for the flooring, but for the entire project). I won't sacrifice safety for cost. I think overall, the building construction methods I am using will be cost competitive with a concrete and block house (for one thing, I don't need all of the formwork and construction supports you see in "standard" concrete and block construction here. The second floor walls, ceilings, roof trusses and roofing will all be steel...heavy steel construction for loadbearing elements and lightweight steel construction for non-loadbearing elements. Once we get the entire project design phase completed, I will share it with you here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

The "squeaky floorboards" syndrome can be prevented from happening by applying a flexible product, like silicon, bitumen even, to all the truss surfaces that will come into contact with the sub flooring etc.

 

I agree completely with you on the silicone. That's why I said our subflooring will be screwed and glued. Either silicone adhesive or a good quality construction adhesive (that will stick to both the steel trusses and the hardiflex sheets) will work. Then, using lots of self-drilling / self-tapping screws to screw down the hardiflex to the floor trusses. We will also use the glued and screwed method to attach the second layer of hardiflex subflooring. There should be absolutely no flex in my floors when I am done. Subflooring that flexes is not a friend of ceramic tile flooring, so it is important to prevent it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..