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We Got It...us Tourist Visa


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Just a few points.

 

Yes I am aware that she can be denied entry....a few things hinge on that...for one, not having any contraband items in her luggage...not dressing like Lady Gaga and acting like Madonna for another. I coached her on what to say, what to do and how to act at the Embassy. Good thing I did too. There were a lot of Filipino;s in line who groused the usual grumblings, curses and complaints. I told her to ignore these people not matter what...she did.

 

Next I told her to hold her cool when she had to deal with any of the bad mannered filipinos employed at the Embassy she would likely encounter. From what she said these Fellow countrymen who function as aides or escorts were the worst of the lot...it sounds as if they intentionally tried to bait her (and others) and talked to her like garbage...at my advice she ignored them and remained polite and professional.

 

The bottom line is you have to have her dress right, act right and warn her that some of these folks will run a head game on her to try and get a rise or a comment out of her...remember she is being scrutinized from the time she arrives at the gate...act accordingly.

 

 

Lakan

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Some months ago I signed on this forum for the first time with a query about any of you who had gotten a Tourist Visa for the Filipina wife, your input and advice.   Well We are pleased to announced

Just because she got the visa doesnt mean she will be allowed into the country when arriving on the flight. Be just as careful with what she says at the arriving airport as you were when doing the in

Sorry, it is a privilege for a visa holder to enter the US, it is not a right. Just as having a California driver's license is a privilege, it is not a right.   The admitting immigration officer (or

That is awesome. Can you elaborate on the documents you included as supporting her return to the Philippines.

 

 

I put everything in the folder I could think of...one side was "my" side. She had my permanent I card, My passport and photo copies of everything including the electric bill proving I lived in the RP for seven years. I had a signed notarized letter of invitation and support outliningmy finances in both the US and the RP and a signed notarized letter from my son (at whose house we will be staying) swearing he would assume responsibility for her and guarentee her compliance should I become incapacitated.

 

On Her side we had bank accounts in her name only, deed to both properties...one which we actually live in and pictures of us in the house and among out possession that showed the value of the home at the worth of those possessions...custom furniture, wide screen TV's computer, motocycles, car etc etc. We had photo copies of her travel stamps to half a dozen Asian countries and return stamps to the RP.

 

This folder was well organized, neat and well ordered with all sorts of documents and official papers. But truthfully, the American reviwer only gave it a cursory look, there was some attention to the house deed and the pictures of the house and possessions but they seemed to be especially interested in the money she had and how she would support herself in the US for the thirty day duration.

 

As I said above, I coached her and made her aware that they might try to trap her or frustrate her or bait her into failing "the Attitude test" with some off the wall question, she had a (truthful) answer for any curveball they might have thrown backed up with documentary PROOF.

 

 

lakan

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shadow

I put everything in the folder I could think of...one side was "my" side. She had my permanent I card, My passport and photo copies of everything including the electric bill proving I lived in the RP for seven years. I had a signed notarized letter of invitation and support outliningmy finances in both the US and the RP and a signed notarized letter from my son (at whose house we will be staying) swearing he would assume responsibility for her and guarentee her compliance should I become incapacitated.

 

On Her side we had bank accounts in her name only, deed to both properties...one which we actually live in and pictures of us in the house and among out possession that showed the value of the home at the worth of those possessions...custom furniture, wide screen TV's computer, motocycles, car etc etc. We had photo copies of her travel stamps to half a dozen Asian countries and return stamps to the RP.

 

This folder was well organized, neat and well ordered with all sorts of documents and official papers. But truthfully, the American reviwer only gave it a cursory look, there was some attention to the house deed and the pictures of the house and possessions but they seemed to be especially interested in the money she had and how she would support herself in the US for the thirty day duration.

 

As I said above, I coached her and made her aware that they might try to trap her or frustrate her or bait her into failing "the Attitude test" with some off the wall question, she had a (truthful) answer for any curveball they might have thrown backed up with documentary PROOF.

 

 

lakan

 

 

Good job. Presentation is at least as important as content!

 

Larry in Dumaguete

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A_Simple_Man
I understand that, but it isn't like three out of four Filipinas get turned away at Immigration.

 

When American citizens line up to enter the US, they go through a different line than those of us who are non US citizens. I had the experience of going through the non citizen lineup in San Francisco two months ago.

 

Every citizen of a foreign country (with one exception that I will get to in a minute) was grilled by Immigration for what seemed like 15 minutes to a half hour. Every one was photographed and fingerprinted. I don't know how many, if any, of the passengers off the Singapore Airlines flight (from Hong Kong) were turned back but there were some sad faces being led away from the immigration desk. Those guys are tough on visitors from any other country . . . except Canada. When I got to the front of the line I was the only one where the official looked at my passport, did not ask for fingerprints or pics, asked where I was staying, and said: Have a nice stay.

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Headshot

When American citizens line up to enter the US, they go through a different line than those of us who are non US citizens. I had the experience of going through the non citizen lineup in San Francisco two months ago.

 

Every citizen of a foreign country (with one exception that I will get to in a minute) was grilled by Immigration for what seemed like 15 minutes to a half hour. Every one was photographed and fingerprinted. I don't know how many, if any, of the passengers off the Singapore Airlines flight (from Hong Kong) were turned back but there were some sad faces being led away from the immigration desk. Those guys are tough on visitors from any other country . . . except Canada. When I got to the front of the line I was the only one where the official looked at my passport, did not ask for fingerprints or pics, asked where I was staying, and said: Have a nice stay.

 

An American citizen husband CAN go through the visitor line with his foreign wife. I know because that was exactly what we did. They processed our passports together, and there were very few questions and no hassle. Granted, my wife was there on a spousal visa, but I don't see where the type of visa would make any difference. It was still the same line. I guess Lakan is going to test the theory that this is Obama loosening the entry rules for visitors to the US.

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SkyMan

When American citizens line up to enter the US, they go through a different line than those of us who are non US citizens. I had the experience of going through the non citizen lineup in San Francisco two months ago.

 

Every citizen of a foreign country (with one exception that I will get to in a minute) was grilled by Immigration for what seemed like 15 minutes to a half hour. Every one was photographed and fingerprinted. I don't know how many, if any, of the passengers off the Singapore Airlines flight (from Hong Kong) were turned back but there were some sad faces being led away from the immigration desk. Those guys are tough on visitors from any other country . . . except Canada. When I got to the front of the line I was the only one where the official looked at my passport, did not ask for fingerprints or pics, asked where I was staying, and said: Have a nice stay.

I don't remember much about when we went through customs in JFK. I don't remember if we went through the same line or not. I do remember she was given some little form about passport size without much on it, maybe a date stamp, that she just absolutely had to have with her when she left. A week later we were boarding a cruise ship in Orlando and they wanted the form so we gave up as we were going to other countries on the cruise. It's kind of unfortunate they don't do customs for cruisers because she didn't get any entry or exit stamps from them in her passport. I know it would be a royal pain to run a few thousand cruisers in and out of customs for a day trip but an optional entry and exit stamp booth would be nice. Anyway, upon return from the cruise I think we spent an hour with customs getting a new form and they wouldn't give her a new entry stamp because they hadn't given her an exit stamp on departure. When we left the country, nobody asked for that form that was so vital to have. Hahahahaha
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SkyMan
An American citizen husband CAN go through the visitor line with his foreign wife.
She can probably go through the citizen line with him too and it's probably shorter and moves faster. Worth a try anyway.
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SkyMan

He has a very valid point. Having items in your luggage or with you that signal you never plan to leave will get you turned back.

Like what? I'm curious what would signal your intention to stay permanently that you wouldn't have for a 90day stay? Bundles of cash I supppose, but that's not allowed anyway. A book on how to go TNT? What else?
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An American citizen husband CAN go through the visitor line with his foreign wife. I know because that was exactly what we did. They processed our passports together, and there were very few questions and no hassle. Granted, my wife was there on a spousal visa, but I don't see where the type of visa would make any difference. It was still the same line. I guess Lakan is going to test the theory that this is Obama loosening the entry rules for visitors to the US.

 

 

Thats right, a friend of mine went thru with his wife who was on a tourist visa after being told by one official to go thru a separate line, when they learned it was husband and wife he was told to go back and go thru with his wife...she had no problem...of course this was at Detroit...not San Franciso.

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Headshot

Thats right, a friend of mine went thru with his wife who was on a tourist visa after being told by one official to go thru a separate line, when they learned it was husband and wife he was told to go back and go thru with his wife...she had no problem...of course this was at Detroit...not San Franciso.

 

It works in San Francisco too. If you are travelling with your wife, always go through the line with her. Always travel with your wife if she is entering the US. It will save a lot of headaches.

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Headshot

He has a very valid point. Having items in your luggage or with you that signal you never plan to leave will get you turned back.

 

Actually...Not really. I mis-read your post before. Customs and Immigration are two different agencies. You go through Immigration before you pick up your baggage and go through Customs. Immigration never sees what is in your luggage. If you say something that signals that you are planning to stay with a tourist visa, THAT will definitely get you turned away.

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Headshot

She can probably go through the citizen line with him too and it's probably shorter and moves faster. Worth a try anyway.

 

Actually, I don't think that would work...and might raise red flags.

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Headshot

When we left the country, nobody asked for that form that was so vital to have.

 

Generally, when you leave the US, you don't go through Immigration, so there are no exit stamps. I have NEVER been through Immigration or Customs LEAVING the country. The only hurdle is TSA, which isn't much of a hurdle. They don't care what you are carrying or where you are going as long as you don't have anything on their list.

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CebuKano

 

 

Actually...Not really. I mis-read your post before. Customs and Immigration are two different agencies. You go through Immigration before you pick up your baggage and go through Customs. Immigration never sees what is in your luggage. If you say something that signals that you are planning to stay with a tourist visa, THAT will definitely get you turned away.

 

"Immigration" and Customs are both associated with the same agency, Department of Homeland Security. It now has the title of Customs and Border Patrol. It can be confusing but Headshot and others are quite right in recommending that you accompany your wife at all times through all lines, interviews, etc. And tell your wife to expect the CBP officer to be rude and arrogant because I have witnessed some pretty awful treatment of non-US citizens during my days of global travel but most of that is what I consider to be a power trip on their part. If the officer is pleasant, consider yourself blessed. Tell her to just to be cool and if she doesn't understand a question, refer to you. Remember that your wife has every lawful reason to enter the US because she has completed the process and has her valid visa.

 

And one further point..... Remember that the burden of proof of her having all her paperwork in order lies with the airline she will be traveling on that lands her in the US. Just like anyone traveling here to the Philippines or any other foreign country, if they allow a passenger to board their plane and they are turned back at "immigration", that airline has to pay a hefty fine and return the "invalid" passenger back to the point of origination. Airlines don't like to do that. So they will make damn sure that everything is in order.

 

So I wouldn't lose any sleep over this because as long as everything is in order, just put up with two minuets of a few questions from the CBP officer AND remember, your wife has not done anything wrong. Please don't let these individuals intimidate you. She has every right to enter the US!

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SkyMan

Generally, when you leave the US, you don't go through Immigration, so there are no exit stamps. I have NEVER been through Immigration or Customs LEAVING the country. The only hurdle is TSA, which isn't much of a hurdle. They don't care what you are carrying or where you are going as long as you don't have anything on their list.

Well, nobody asked for that form that she just had to have. I'm pretty sure it's still in her passport.
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