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What salary does a chef / cook make in Cebu?


Maybe Next Yr

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Maybe Next Yr

My gf has a full time office job but is also studying at a local culinary institute. She's interested in becoming a chef) she's already a great cook in my book). I'm guessing the salary differences between "high-end" chef and cook in a fast food joint will be a lot a different ... any ideas what these folks make?

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udonthani

varies. Once I met in a Filipino chef in Phnom Penh, working in a western type coffee-shop restaurant. He got the job, because it is perceived by the Khmers, that Filipinos are more western, and more attuned to western cuisine. He wasn't making much, or so he said, $100-$120 a month. But he told me, that was more than what he could expect to get in Manila.

 

I would be interested to know, how many chefs as in what proportion of the chefs that work in restaurants in the Philippines, take home five figure, as in 10,000 pesos or more monthly salaries. My guess is very few. Maybe 10-15%.

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KennyF

Let's sort something out right away.

A COOK might be struggling to make 10,000 pesos a month.

No CHEF would work for less than that.

 

KonGC

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Davaoeno

My friend owns a restaurant here, used to be 2 until they raised the lease on one out of site. His wife took culinary courses but didnt find any in Davao good enough so went to a school in Manila. They had a big cooking contest here and Makro [sM] put up a huge tarp with the finalist about 12feet by 40 feet . She got first prize .

 

They often have people come to apply for jobs cooking in the restaurant. They have yet to find one who after taking a cooking course she felt was qualified to actually start work in a restaurant - and retrains them. .

 

Many training courses here are more about the fees, and the issuance of a piece of paper, than about actual learning and experience.

 

I had a previous gf who had a degree in HRM from Univ of Mindanao. After spending a couple of weeks with her, and discussing the workings of many restaurants that we ate in, it was my conclusion that she was not qualified to do much of anything in a restaurant. As to having her manage a hotel - i wouldnt let her manage a sari sari store without supervision

 

Wages for a cook [ which here seems to be anyone who can prepare any kind of food]? I think that a more realistic number is 250 pesos a day [ 6 days a week ], with one meal per day provided. The word "overtime" does not seem to exist in any filipino language.

Edited by DAVAOENO
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Stranded Shipscook

TheOp asked for salaries, so i try:

 

A newbie or fresh graduate in "regular" Restaurants, minimum Salary or less. This is because a fresh "graduate" has no practical skills and therefore has to proof him/herself first.

 

With experience ( and own menu ) from a former employment it depends on the Establishment and the position he/she held.

Lets say 3 years experience :

 

In Cebu they generally get:

 

300 - 450/day if "assistant" position prior.

 

600- 800/day if prior been executive Chef/ Chefcook in a "better" Restaurant with a good repuation for its Cuisine.

 

More if the person got mentioned in the Newspapers or media.

 

But in general those go abroad already ( get headhunted )

 

The after a few years they may return and open an own Place or (if no savings) try their luck again in the open Job market.

 

One can say, good Cooks/Chefcooks are a very desired commodity here. But one can not simply "study" the job, its actually more like an "Art" and requires Talent. ( and practise, years of work practise )

But one could train anyone in a few months to "copy" the dishes on the menu.

 

As its done daily in a Hotel or larger Restaurant. The (often International) "Chef" creates a dish, then organizes its "fabrication" in groups and "voiala" you have a new food produced by simple "laborers". One cuts the meat/fish, one produces the sauce, one roasts,cooks or griddles, one cooks the siding, one makes the "deco" and so on. Doesn't requires much skills to do that.

 

Even the often presented fantastic "Signature dishes" are no criteria for an Employer, because they are seldom possible to re-manufacture in a commercial environment due to time/money constraints.

Edited by Guenther Vomberg
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Mang Kanor

varies. Once I met in a Filipino chef in Phnom Penh, working in a western type coffee-shop restaurant. He got the job, because it is perceived by the Khmers, that Filipinos are more western, and more attuned to western cuisine. He wasn't making much, or so he said, $100-$120 a month. But he told me, that was more than what he could expect to get in Manila.

 

I would be interested to know, how many chefs as in what proportion of the chefs that work in restaurants in the Philippines, take home five figure, as in 10,000 pesos or more monthly salaries. My guess is very few. Maybe 10-15%.

 

lol $100 to $120 per month??? that is BS

 

how can he survive with $100 to $120 a month in a country where he has to rent a house and pay for everything...

 

why go abroad for merely 5000 pesos a month??? Manila's regular salary is around 360 to 450 pesos a day.

 

that is pure lie and degrading...

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Faluango

I know a Filipino cook who started out working in a expat hangout restobar and is now working on a ship at sea.... my guess is that he's making atleast twice than what anyone is describing here

Edited by Faluango
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spritsail
Many training courses here are more about the fees, and the issuance of a piece of paper, than about actual learning and experience.

 

Commercial cooking courses in approved state colleges here are covered by TESDA, that is a government funded course and nationally and internationally recognised diploma. Its costs around 500 php for a three month semester to do the course. One of my bro in laws is doing one for a job in Doha, Qatar, guaranteed if he gets the diploma

 

Naturally there are many colleges that offer culinary courses at a fee - they do not provide an nationally or internationally recognised diploma. A five day culinary course in England can cost 10000 dollars a week, but at least you can share a cutting board with Kate Middleton,s sister or similiar upper class debutante, or weeks sushi training in Tokyo will cost the same.

 

As already quoted - cooks are but cooks, chefs are gods.

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Davaoeno

My niece expressed a desire to take a course. I have no problem with paying the fees, but would rather pay 10,000 pesos in fees for a good course than 500 pesos for a garbage course . [ I am NOT saying that the TESDA course that you mentioned is garbage- but many of the cheap ones I looked into are . ]

 

You will notice that I said that I looked into - does no one here get any vocational guidance into how to pursue a career ??

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udonthani

lol $100 to $120 per month??? that is BS

 

how can he survive with $100 to $120 a month in a country where he has to rent a house and pay for everything...

 

why go abroad for merely 5000 pesos a month??? Manila's regular salary is around 360 to 450 pesos a day.

 

that is pure lie and degrading...

 

where you get this wrong, is that it's in Manila where he would have had to rent a place and pay for everything, not Phnom Penh.

 

they got accommodation on site in the Phnom Penh restauranr, and free. The food was also free. The $120 a month was pay was totally in their pocket, and not taxed. Also all the staff got a share of tips on top of that.

 

Add it all up and they were much better off than in Manila which is a much more expensive city than Phnom Penh, they wouldn't have got free food, they wouldn't have got free accommodation, and they would have paid tax.

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Wombat No More

Mine gets around P9,000 plus tips, which after equally sharing between all staff, is about another P600. He's very competent and knows many dozens of dishes and has spent many years at good resorts and hotels. He's even doing another course now, 4 hours a day, 5 days a week, 2 months, before coming to work for his 8 hour shift. His salary is what he himself asked for. He wanted to work at Wombat's coz he lives across the street and I'll pay his SSS, Phil Health etc. The assistant cook gets P305/day, same as the waiting staff, plus tips.

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