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towboat72

hollow block mold

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Brucewayne

Tell me that when your 50 blocks per bag are cracking and mine are still solid.

Mine were 40 per bag and that makes a big difference in strength.

I talked to a lot of local block makers and theirs were averaging about 100-150 per bag!

I don't believe everything I read, but that's just me I guess.

Oh and most factory molds are expensive and flimsy.

A welder can make them to your specifications for only about P2,000 each.

I don't like having to buy only what is available, no true survivalist would.

 

 

 

Wait, you must be talking about 4" blocks.

In that case, you can make 50 per sack.

If you are making 6" blocks, you get 42-42, but 8" blocks should be no more than 40 blocks per sack.

Sorry, I pretty much think 8" blocks as the standard.

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SkyMan

I have not researched block makers so i can not comment on the cost. I have however done extensive research into buying a mixer . A one bagger - new, with a choice of either diesel or gas engine runs just shy of 50,000 pesos .

When you say new do you mean new or newly refurbished like a multicab? Belmont Tools has refurbs with a new 7.5HP Subaru engine for p44.5K.

Where is this block maker? We were looking at a used one a while back and it was more than that. Hmmm maybe I should sell the block makers?

Sorry, I was a little off. Belmont Tools prices for block makers are...

 

4" makes 3 @ a time p24K currently not in stock in Mandaue. p68 per plate so 200 plates about p14K so p38K all in

6" makes 3 @ a time p27.5 p85 per plate or p44.5K with 200 plates

 

To save some $ it is possible to use it with only 3 plates if the fresh blocks are immediately flipped onto plywood squares for curing like the by hand block makers use.

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thebob

 

The locals want 4" and 6" only, but I refused to make 4", too thin to support a 2nd floor as far as I am concerned.

 

 

This just doesn't make any sense to me. Hollow block shouldn't be used as a structural support. The material you are wasting with an 8 inch block could be spent on shuttering, and then you could just cast a 2 inch thick monolithic structure that would be cheaper, stronger and have less thermal mass.

 

 

By adding more cement to blocks, you are adding more heat to the cure, which speeds up the hydration leading to a weaker block.

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Brucewayne

This just doesn't make any sense to me. Hollow block shouldn't be used as a structural support. The material you are wasting with an 8 inch block could be spent on shuttering, and then you could just cast a 2 inch thick monolithic structure that would be cheaper, stronger and have less thermal mass.

 

 

By adding more cement to blocks, you are adding more heat to the cure, which speeds up the hydration leading to a weaker block.

 

 

The time, labor and cost of the cement you waste by filling the blocks is wrong and a proper structure should rest on at least the outside walls which in turn helps to keep them from falling in on you.

The free standing roof above the walls is a waste of time and money, you gain nothing by building that way.

Besides when you fill the blocks, you are destroying any thermal insulation benefit a hollow block offers and might as well build forms and make a solid wall to begin with.

The way they do it here is to add stucco to the outside, which is fine, but then they only add stucco to the inside, or they may have to build another thin wall to contain insulation to block out the heat generated by the solid cement wall.

Edited by Brucewayne

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Cuda

This just doesn't make any sense to me. Hollow block shouldn't be used as a structural support. The material you are wasting with an 8 inch block could be spent on shuttering, and then you could just cast a 2 inch thick monolithic structure that would be cheaper, stronger and have less thermal mass.

 

 

By adding more cement to blocks, you are adding more heat to the cure, which speeds up the hydration leading to a weaker block.

I don't want to get into this too deep but you have no idea about 8" hollow block load bearingproperties and 2 inch thick load bearing structure is just laughable.

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fredanna

If my grandad was still alive I could have easily gotten him to invest in a real block making plant over there. He had a "hollow block" or "Cinder block" plant here in the USA. It was a HUGE electric operated machine that could mix the correct amount of concrete and produce a 1,000 or more blocks per day. It included the "shaker" and forms to make 25 blocks every couple of minutes. While we were on Summer vacation and watching the TV, the picture was shrunk, just a little square picture, because of the plant in operation. There was probably less than 90volts AC in the house when the plant was operating, crushing rocks, conveyor belts, and block making.

This was 1950's technology and most of the plant was all electric machines. The guy was brilliant and an immigrant from Italy....The workers had forklifts hauling these blocks out to the yard to dry. Even as he approached his 90th BD...he begged someone to get another business started.

He bragged about his special patented formula of the blocks being 100% waterproof. I cannot find any archived logo from his business, but there was a bottle of water, upside down on a cinder block, proclaiming that his blocks were 100% waterproof.

His process would probably push the cost of a block in the Phils to P1000 a piece.

Sorry for a long useless post.

Fred

Edited by fredanna
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towboat72

If my grandad was still alive I could have easily gotten him to invest in a real block making plant over there. He had a "hollow block" or "Cinder block" plant here in the USA. It was a HUGE electric operated machine that could mix the correct amount of concrete and produce a 1,000 or more blocks per day. It included the "shaker" and forms to make 25 blocks every couple of minutes. While we were on Summer vacation and watching the TV, the picture was shrunk, just a little square picture, because of the plant in operation. There was probably less than 90volts AC in the house when the plant was operating, crushing rocks, conveyor belts, and block making.

This was 1950's technology and most of the plant was all electric machines. The guy was brilliant and an immigrant from Italy....The workers had forklifts hauling these blocks out to the yard to dry. Even as he approached his 90th BD...he begged someone to get another business started.

He bragged about his special patented formula of the blocks being 100% waterproof. I cannot find any archived logo from his business, but there was a bottle of water, upside down on a cinder block, proclaiming that his blocks were 100% waterproof.

His process would probably push the cost of a block in the Phils to P1000 a piece.

Sorry for a long useless post.

Fred

 

i loved that story.i dont want a business just want to make good block for my own use.

 

i see your from new castle pa i was born and raised in lancaster pa

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