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Solar panels to ease electric bill...?


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KennyF

The inverter is 1,000 watts

 

OK, now I get it.

The inverter is 1,000 watt so probably has momentary surge rate of 1,500 or 1,700 watts which handles start up for those appliances that need it like motors.

 

The output of the solar plates will be maximum 800 watt in full direct sun (7 hours a day).

 

To be hones, I can't see that solar array keeping the battery bank charged enough to keep those appliances running because average hours of sunshine in Cebu city are low.

post-4822-0-97610700-1341025519_thumb.jpg

Note that half the year has only 7 hours of sunshine a day.

 

Also those batteries are over $200 each (8,900 pesos) and as they are 6v we need minimum 2.

 

It's great to be able to discus and analyse different takes on this backup power stuff.

 

KonGC

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My in-law actually got the charge controller & inverter from a solar installer there in Cebu! The solar installer sells his 100 watts panel @ 22k. We got ours from local store that sells "made in

Not really, they are too expensive for most people. As far as expats go i think most rent so no panels there.As for 1 & 3, much of that depends on where you live and what's available there. More

We recently installed 1080w of solar panels, plus the necessary inverters, charge controllers & a total of 12 200ah batteries. It's for two houses, one house is completely off the grid except for

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OK, now I get it.

The inverter is 1,000 watt so probably has momentary surge rate of 1,500 or 1,700 watts which handles start up for those appliances that need it like motors.

 

The output of the solar plates will be maximum 800 watt in full direct sun (7 hours a day).

 

To be hones, I can't see that solar array keeping the battery bank charged enough to keep those appliances running because average hours of sunshine in Cebu city are low.

post-4822-0-97610700-1341025519_thumb.jpg

Note that half the year has only 7 hours of sunshine a day.

 

Also those batteries are over $200 each (8,900 pesos) and as they are 6v we need minimum 2.

 

It's great to be able to discus and analyse different takes on this backup power stuff.

 

KonGC

 

The solar array starts charging as early as 6am since they were laid out facing the south east direction.

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OK, now I get it.

The inverter is 1,000 watt so probably has momentary surge rate of 1,500 or 1,700 watts which handles start up for those appliances that need it like motors.

 

The output of the solar plates will be maximum 800 watt in full direct sun (7 hours a day).

 

To be hones, I can't see that solar array keeping the battery bank charged enough to keep those appliances running because average hours of sunshine in Cebu city are low.

post-4822-0-97610700-1341025519_thumb.jpg

Note that half the year has only 7 hours of sunshine a day.

 

Also those batteries are over $200 each (8,900 pesos) and as they are 6v we need minimum 2.

 

It's great to be able to discus and analyse different takes on this backup power stuff.

 

KonGC

 

To really keep it simple, one can run the whole house lights from one 12 volts car( US model 620 costs about $80.00 ) battery even without converter. Just use 12 volts DC LED lights

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KennyF
To really keep it simple, one can run the whole house lights from one 12 volts car( US model 620 costs about $80.00 ) battery even without converter. Just use 12 volts DC LED lights

 

Hey yeh, every day is Xmas day.

 

KonGC

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Voyager

Charge controller @ 4k

Inverter @ 10k

I would like to see the information and specs on this inverter. I installed and run 18-6volt batteries powered by a 2500 watt inverter which is connected to ac, 4- 200watt solar panels and one 500 watt wind generator in the US on my sailboat and this inverter cost me $2200 US. Granted it is fully automatic but still that is a big difference from 10k.

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KennyF

I would like to see the information and specs on this inverter. I installed and run 18-6volt batteries powered by a 2500 watt inverter which is connected to ac, 4- 200watt solar panels and one 500 watt wind generator in the US on my sailboat and this inverter cost me $2200 US. Granted it is fully automatic but still that is a big difference from 10k.

Voyager, you've lost me a bit here.

What I understand is that you charge a bank of 18 batteries with 4 x 200 watt panels and a 500 watt wind generator. (1300 watts in total on a windy sunny day)

You then feed this DC from the battery bank to a 2,500 watt inverter which pumps out AC at what? 110v or 220v.

 

If I've got that right you had a damn good system going for you.

 

KonGC

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Hey yeh, every day is Xmas day.

 

KonGC

 

LOL

So you no like no Christmas ?

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Voyager

Voyager, you've lost me a bit here.

What I understand is that you charge a bank of 18 batteries with 4 x 200 watt panels and a 500 watt wind generator. (1300 watts in total on a windy sunny day)

You then feed this DC from the battery bank to a 2,500 watt inverter which pumps out AC at what? 110v or 220v.

 

If I've got that right you had a damn good system going for you.

 

KonGC

Voyager, you've lost me a bit here.

What I understand is that you charge a bank of 18 batteries with 4 x 200 watt panels and a 500 watt wind generator. (1300 watts in total on a windy sunny day)

You then feed this DC from the battery bank to a 2,500 watt inverter which pumps out AC at what? 110v or 220v.

 

If I've got that right you had a damn good system going for you.

 

KonGC

Now you got to remember that the boat is docked most of the time and the inverter charges the batteries off of ac, solor and wind while docked. A good inverter is programmed to go by a computer interface. I have it set that solar and wind are primary when docked for charging then ac and then generator.

 

With this inverter I have can set it to 220 or 110 but since I'm American it is at 110. When ac power is turned off the ice maker is turned off but the main fridge, freezer (which runs off of 12volts) the tv's in the aft, forward and main cabin have power along with the main computer in the salon that run the navigation which has its own backup.

 

I have sailed many, many miles and this type of system is good for boat use but I still not see it for home use even with the current technology.

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KennyF

OK, hold it right there.

Now I know where I lost the plot.

 

>>>> the inverter charges the batteries off of ac

 

An inverter hooks up to a battery and changes 12 volts DC into 120 volts AC.

 

I think you mean you have a charger that plugs into 110 volts AC and charges the batteries.

 

KonGC

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thebob

Think of the battery bank as the store, The charge controller charges the battery bank, and the Inverter changes your battery output into a form that you can use in the house i.e. 240VAC at 50Hz or whatever.

 

It is common to use battery banks at 24 - 48 volts DC because you don't need such large wires to prevent voltage drop.

 

It would be very easy to include a top up charge from the mains for cloudy days if you are getting a low battery bank.

 

That would be a transformer with a diode bridge to rectify the output from the step-down transformer to your battery bank. About 27.6 V for a 24V system or about double that for a 12V system.

 

Most charge controllers just dump excess current when the batteries are full. This could be directed to running fans or a water tank heater without too much fuss.

 

It is best to not add or remove batteries from a bank, they tend to "grow old" together, and don't like youngsters being introduced.

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Think of the battery bank as the store, The charge controller charges the battery bank, and the Inverter changes your battery output into a form that you can use in the house i.e. 240VAC at 50Hz or whatever.

 

It is common to use battery banks at 24 - 48 volts DC because you don't need such large wires to prevent voltage drop.

 

It would be very easy to include a top up charge from the mains for cloudy days if you are getting a low battery bank.

 

That would be a transformer with a diode bridge to rectify the output from the step-down transformer to your battery bank. About 27.6 V for a 24V system or about double that for a 12V system.

 

Most charge controllers just dump excess current when the batteries are full. This could be directed to running fans or a water tank heater without too much fuss.

 

It is best to not add or remove batteries from a bank, they tend to "grow old" together, and don't like youngsters being introduced.

 

A simple way to do is to install a knife switch, I think our electrician used a double throw with our system. When our batteries are low, hubby just flip the switch & we'll be using the mains.

 

 

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