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Solar panels to ease electric bill...?


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Paul
Great stuff if you cant get onto the grid but if you are able to access the grid, won't it take rather a long time to get the value off this kit back? I mean, were talking close to 200,000 pesos to set this up as near as I can figure.

 

I was just about to order solar panels to put on the roof of my apartment in the Philippines, prior to leaving. I knew that, without question, it would take a long time to recoup my investment, if ever. My priority was to stabilize my electrical issues, not concerning myself with how long it would take for the array to pay for itself.

 

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My in-law actually got the charge controller & inverter from a solar installer there in Cebu! The solar installer sells his 100 watts panel @ 22k. We got ours from local store that sells "made in

Not really, they are too expensive for most people. As far as expats go i think most rent so no panels there.As for 1 & 3, much of that depends on where you live and what's available there. More

We recently installed 1080w of solar panels, plus the necessary inverters, charge controllers & a total of 12 200ah batteries. It's for two houses, one house is completely off the grid except for

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easy44

 

If you leave it set up, will it add 250,000 to your selling price?

 

KonGC

 

No. Most people will look at it as a cool curiosity, but won't pay more for it.

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KennyF

So for under 10,000 pesos I can set up a battery/inverter which will act as a voltage stabiliser and switch over immediately, run my TV and lights for several hours per battery and be silent.

A 10,000 peso set up would give you about 4 or 5 hours.

Two batteries, 8 to 10 hours and so on.

 

It's a guess here on my behalf but I bet it's cheaper to use grid to recharge those batteries than to buy petrol for a gen set.

 

For me, being poor, that's the answer.

 

KonGC

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Paul
For me, being poor, that's the answer.

 

Well, work on that second (or is it third?) million, Kenny, and then you can probably swing it. :D:P :P

 

Personally, I like the option of solar, or a solar and wind combination for power generation. It beats the hell out of the noise, fuel costs, maintenance of dealing with a generator. Lord only knows how long a solar array will last before you have to do any maintenance to it at all.

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KennyF
Lord only knows how long a solar array will last before you have to do any maintenance to it at all.

 

Or it gets swiped off your roof when you're not home.

Same for generator.

 

KonGC

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Paul

The building we are in has a security wall around it, a guard at night, and a gate out front. They could, I suppose, climb up a ladder, if they can get one that will reach to the roof - of a three story building. So, it is possible, I agree. Probable? Well, that is a different story.

 

The generator is only going to be a small one. It can be chained to the column outside my apartment. Or, brought inside when not running.

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That assumes a monthly electricity bill of 3,333 pesos.

Is that normal for an established home?

 

KonGC

 

i would say it would be little bit on the high side . If your electric bill is only the P1,670 per month it would take 10 years to break even.

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Well, work on that second (or is it third?) million, Kenny, and then you can probably swing it. :D:P :P

 

Personally, I like the option of solar, or a solar and wind combination for power generation. It beats the hell out of the noise, fuel costs, maintenance of dealing with a generator. Lord only knows how long a solar array will last before you have to do any maintenance to it at all.

 

Panel is maintenance free, the cost in US is about $2.00 per watt . If you shield outside wiring from direct sunlight it should also last decade or more .

The most efficient system right now is the 3-4 batteries charged by solar power. IMO

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SkyMan

Would it help to use the inverter from a typical computer UPS?

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I think this is where the main savings could be made in a DIY system. 1000 watts at that price is 160,000 pesos.

 

Making your own panels from bare cells could cut this cost considerably.

 

I'd be interested to know where you bought the charge controller and the inverter.

 

It is actually quite cheap to build a charge controller! But the inverter is a different matter.

 

 

My in-law actually got the charge controller & inverter from a solar installer there in Cebu! The solar installer sells his 100 watts panel @ 22k. We got ours from local store that sells "made in China" stuffs @ 16k. We were supposed to buy their 160 watts panels but they don't have enough in stock, reason why we ended up buying the 100 watts panels.

 

 

 

 

That assumes a monthly electricity bill of 3,333 pesos.

Is that normal for an established home?

 

KonGC

 

 

Our monthly electric bill averages 5k a month.

 

 

 

I'm a bit confused by this label.

The panels are 18v? is that normal?

It's an 800w set but the inverter is 12v 600w?

The inverter is pure sine wave? Why? Expensive and not generally needed.

The battery is 6v? It's deep cycle, which due to the inverter, is not needed.

 

Can run 2 x 3watt LED bulbs for 10 hours? Whoopdedo!

Run a 50 watt PC for only 2 hours but a 500w pump for 1 hour???

 

KonGC

 

 

I dunno for sure if that's the "exact" set up but I just posted that for price comparison.

 

My in-law's set up can run fridge 24/7, 500 watts water pump which is on stand by 24/7, 5 watts light which we leave on for at least 10 hours at night, tv & dvd for a couple of hours every night.

 

 

The house that uses 800 watts, What all are you running in the house with that 800 watts.

 

Fridge on 24/7

Water pump 1/2hp

TV & DVD player

Laptop

1/2hp aircon (been tested and it can run the aircon though it's not often used)

2 ceiling fans

2 electric fans

18 5 watts energy saving lights (one stays on for the whole night)

Microwave

500 watts electric kettle

 

Only the shower heater isolated from the solar setup.

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I was just about to order solar panels to put on the roof of my apartment in the Philippines, prior to leaving. I knew that, without question, it would take a long time to recoup my investment, if ever. My priority was to stabilize my electrical issues, not concerning myself with how long it would take for the array to pay for itself.

 

Just one view on this.

 

Our house runs on 80 watts solar panels for our electric lights and 200 watts for our 2 laptops, wifi/modem which stays on 24/7, cordless phone, 5 watts table lamp & occassional mobile phone charging. Those are our priority to stabilize our electrical issues.

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My in-law actually got the charge controller & inverter from a solar installer there in Cebu! The solar installer sells his 100 watts panel @ 22k. We got ours from local store that sells "made in China" stuffs @ 16k. We were supposed to buy their 160 watts panels but they don't have enough in stock, reason why we ended up buying the 100 watts panels.

 

 

 

 

 

Our monthly electric bill averages 5k a month.

 

 

 

 

 

I dunno for sure if that's the "exact" set up but I just posted that for price comparison.

 

My in-law's set up can run fridge 24/7, 500 watts water pump which is on stand by 24/7, 5 watts light which we leave on for at least 10 hours at night, tv & dvd for a couple of hours every night.

 

 

 

 

Fridge on 24/7

Water pump 1/2hp

TV & DVD player

Laptop

1/2hp aircon (been tested and it can run the aircon though it's not often used)

2 ceiling fans

2 electric fans

18 5 watts energy saving lights (one stays on for the whole night)

Microwave

500 watts electric kettle

 

Only the shower heater isolated from the solar setup.

 

So are you saying you are saving 5,000 a month by having this system ?

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KennyF
Fridge on 24/7 Water pump 1/2hp TV & DVD player Laptop 1/2hp aircon (been tested and it can run the aircon though it's not often used) 2 ceiling fans 2 electric fans 18 5 watts energy saving lights (one stays on for the whole night) Microwave 500 watts electric kettle Only the shower heater isolated from the solar setup.

 

Hopefully they don't want all at once because it would shut down under overload.

 

But here's the thing.

How many and what size is/are the batteries? What capacity?

 

KonGC

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So are you saying you are saving 5,000 a month by having this system ?

 

Our 5k bill is for running 2 houses. Only one house is completely off grid. We'll find out this coming July if there's a significant drop on our electric bill consumption. Though there was a slight drop on our current bill, the system went online last May 16, our meter gets read every 2nd of the month.

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Hopefully they don't want all at once because it would shut down under overload.

 

But here's the thing.

How many and what size is/are the batteries? What capacity?

 

KonGC

 

Fridge & microwave doesn't run on both at the same time. When the microwave's in use, the fridge temporarily goes off.

 

The inverter is 1,000 watts & these are the batteries http://www.motolite.com/battery.php?id=4. Will ask later how many batteries..

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