Jump to content

A tourist visa to the US...


Recommended Posts

shadow

 

YOU become a permanent resident of the Philippines, marry her, and then it's a rubber stamp. For the latter, people might say oterwise, but it works, I've done it, it's just not done often.

 

 

LOL, sorry, it's not as easy as all that. There are numerous forum members who will tell you with first hand experience it is not a "rubber stamp". There are threads on this subject, perhaps you should read them.

 

Larry in Dumaguete

Edited by shadow
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 36
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • shadow

    8

  • shamgod41

    7

  • smokey

    5

  • Paul

    4

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Does this have anything to do with a tourist visa? Ya know, the subject?I'm the guy you misquoted. Looks like you pieced together parts of 3 or more posts with mine in the middle to get the outcome

You don't get to tell me who I speak for and don't speak for. And immigrating means you can never leave? Tell that to the former CEO of FB. I myself spent a lifetime in Alabama one year. How so?Yes

Easier n cheaper just go to Disney in Hong Kong.

shamgod41

Well Larry in Dumaguete, you don't know what you're talking about. I've done it, and so have others. And if you think it's easy getting a permanent residency in the Philippines then you obviously know little about how things work and the amount of red tape involved.

 

Btw, don't feel bad about being misinformed on this subject, the US Mission also is poorly informed, I recall speaking with a supervisor in Passport office who insisted, much as you are, that this isn't possible. Unfortunately, people in the Passport Unit don't know as much as they think they do about who and who doesn't get Visitor's Visas. The Passport Office deals with US Passports, not visas for Filipinos.

 

Also, consider the logic, to argue that the spouse of a USC residing overseas should instead apply for immigrant visa would require committing immigration fraud as the USC is a foreign resident and there'd be no intent on the Filipino's part to reside in the USA presumably.

 

This is not the fastest or easiest way to get a Filipino to the USA, that'd probably be Fiance Visa, but the OP asked how to get a Tourist Visa -- and I answered.

Edited by shamgod41
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
shadow

Well Larry in Dumaguete, you don't know what you're talking about. I've done it, and so have others. And if you think it's easy getting a permanent residency in the Philippines then you obviously know little about how things work and the amount of red tape involved.

 

Btw, don't feel bad about being misinformed on this subject, the US Mission also is poorly informed, I recall speaking with a supervisor in Passport office who insisted, much as you are, that this isn't possible. Unfortunately, people in the Passport Unit don't know as much as they think they do about who and who doesn't get Visitor's Visas. The Passport Office deals with US Passports, not visas for Filipinos.

 

Also, consider the logic, to argue that the spouse of a USC residing overseas should instead apply for immigrant visa would require committing immigration fraud as the USC is a foreign resident and there'd be no intent on the Filipino's part to reside in the USA presumably.

 

This is not the fastest or easiest way to get a Filipino to the USA, that'd probably be Fiance Visa, but the OP asked how to get a Tourist Visa -- and I answered.

 

ROFLMAO. Sorry, it is not me that is misinformed. I will admit it does increase the odds, but most are still denied. It is certainly NOT a "rubber stamp". Many is the US citizen with 13A visa that processed a spousal visa so his bride could visit the US. If you were half as informed as you claim you would have read the forum before making offhand uninformed remarks. Maybe I could point you to ONE of several threads about this;

 

http://www.livinginc...visa-for-asawa/

 

I suspect others will be weighing in on this soon.

 

And where did I state or imply it was easy to obtain a 13A?

 

Larry in Dumaguete

Edited by shadow
Link to post
Share on other sites
shamgod41

Spousal visas are immigrant visas and not meant for casual trips to Disneyworld. . Using an immigrant visa for a vacation is fraud. You would have to LIE, under oath, in your interview with regards to your intention to return to the Philippines. If you think that's a smart way to navigate through US immigration laws you may be in for a rude awakening. Immigrant visas actually are for people who intend to immigrate, permanently.

 

About the link you suggested I read supports my case, not yours. The guy did exactly what I did. Permanent Residency got his wife a tourist visa. That's how the law works. Now you know.

 

 

 

Posted 31 March 2012 - 07:47 PM

 

lakan, on 31 March 2012 - 01:00 PM, said:

 

 

I'm wondering if anyone has gotten a tourist visa for their Filipino spouse recently. Most of the Americsnapback.pngan expats I've talked to say they have belakanI've posted this before but my wife was approved first try, no problem. I guess we're in the 1%. On paper, Headshot and I are almost identical. Similar ages of us and our wives. Married about the same length of time, both with 13As, established roots here, retired AF, etc.The one difference was that, knowing I would probably not be allowed to enter the embassy with her, I drafted a one page letter explaining why we were going to the US and that the trip would be about a month but certainly not more then 45 days. I mentioned we were planning to take a cruise so the visa would need to be multiple entry, etc. I used my military (retired) signature block but I have no idea if that made any difference. I gave my wife copies and told her that if anyone asks for any paperwork from her to put a copy of the letter on top. She did that at the interview and the interviewer read it. Then took it back to her boss who also read it. Apparently they laughed about something though I'm really not sure what was funny. I did include a bit that I was considering having a restaurant in Cebu and I wanted my wife to see what real restaurant service was like. I was dead serious but perhaps that was it. Anyway, the interviewer returned and asked maybe 4 simple questions. How long have you been married? Like that. Then she asked to see a copy of my 13A and she was approved. I only know of one guy who got his wife a tourist visa...and that was on the second try the first was rejected.

 

I'd like to hear about your experience either way.

 

Thanks

Edited by shamgod41
Link to post
Share on other sites
shadow

Spousal visas are immigrant visas and not meant for casual trips to Disneyworld. . Using an immigrant visa for a vacation is fraud. You would have to LIE, under oath, in your interview with regards to your intention to return to the Philippines. If you think that's a smart way to navigate through US immigration laws you may be in for a rude awakening. Immigrant visas actually are for people who intend to immigrate, permanently.

 

About the link you suggested I read supports my case, not yours. The guy did exactly what I did. Permanent Residency got his wife a tourist visa. That's how the law works. Now you know.

 

 

 

Posted 31 March 2012 - 07:47 PM

 

lakan, on 31 March 2012 - 01:00 PM, said:

 

 

I'm wondering if anyone has gotten a tourist visa for their Filipino spouse recently. Most of the Americsnapback.pngan expats I've talked to say they have belakanI've posted this before but my wife was approved first try, no problem. I guess we're in the 1%. On paper, Headshot and I are almost identical. Similar ages of us and our wives. Married about the same length of time, both with 13As, established roots here, retired AF, etc.The one difference was that, knowing I would probably not be allowed to enter the embassy with her, I drafted a one page letter explaining why we were going to the US and that the trip would be about a month but certainly not more then 45 days. I mentioned we were planning to take a cruise so the visa would need to be multiple entry, etc. I used my military (retired) signature block but I have no idea if that made any difference. I gave my wife copies and told her that if anyone asks for any paperwork from her to put a copy of the letter on top. She did that at the interview and the interviewer read it. Then took it back to her boss who also read it. Apparently they laughed about something though I'm really not sure what was funny. I did include a bit that I was considering having a restaurant in Cebu and I wanted my wife to see what real restaurant service was like. I was dead serious but perhaps that was it. Anyway, the interviewer returned and asked maybe 4 simple questions. How long have you been married? Like that. Then she asked to see a copy of my 13A and she was approved. I only know of one guy who got his wife a tourist visa...and that was on the second try the first was rejected.

 

I'd like to hear about your experience either way.

 

Thanks

 

Nice try, but you changed the post and took it out of context, kind of like a "sham"? Maybe you should read the thread again;

 

http://www.livingincebuforums.com/user/12484-lakan/

 

Anyone who is reading this thread can go to this link and READ what it says, it does NOT read the way you pasted it. This does wonders for your credibility, is this the way you plan run your non profit organization? With misinformation deliberately altered to suit your thoughts?

 

THIS is what the original poster had to say;

 

"I'm wondering if anyone has gotten a tourist visa for their Filipino spouse recently. Most of the American expats I've talked to say they have been rejected. I only know of one guy who got his wife a tourist visa...and that was on the second try the first was rejected."

 

 

Another poster claimed he was successful, but yet others claimed they were denied.

 

My experience is that we have processed numerous spousal immigrant visas for clients who have been turned down a tourist visa, (Headshot's for one) some of them were turned down numerous times.

 

One case we had the US citizen had over a $500,000 USD investment in the Philippines, yet his wife was denied a tourist visa twice. With some coaching, we managed to get her the tourist visa. I would not call three trips to the embassy and a cost of over $1000 in fees and expenses a "rubber stamp".

 

As I said, having a 13A does increase the odds, but it is not a "rubber stamp" to success as you claim. Most are still denied. We have processed over 300 visas since 2005, how many have you processed?

 

Larry in Dumaguete

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

Well Larry in Dumaguete, you don't know what you're talking about. I've done it, and so have others. And if you think it's easy getting a permanent residency in the Philippines then you obviously know little about how things work and the amount of red tape involved.

 

Btw, don't feel bad about being misinformed on this subject, the US Mission also is poorly informed, I recall speaking with a supervisor in Passport office who insisted, much as you are, that this isn't possible. Unfortunately, people in the Passport Unit don't know as much as they think they do about who and who doesn't get Visitor's Visas. The Passport Office deals with US Passports, not visas for Filipinos.

 

Also, consider the logic, to argue that the spouse of a USC residing overseas should instead apply for immigrant visa would require committing immigration fraud as the USC is a foreign resident and there'd be no intent on the Filipino's part to reside in the USA presumably.

 

This is not the fastest or easiest way to get a Filipino to the USA, that'd probably be Fiance Visa, but the OP asked how to get a Tourist Visa -- and I answered.

 

Sorry pal, but YOU are the guy who doesn’t know what he is talking about. You are up in the night. About 99% of Filipinas affiliated in any way to an American citizen are denied US tourist visas on their first application. In the denial slip they hand the applicant at the end of the interview, it states clearly that the person should not apply again unless something has changed.

 

First of all, the interview for the tourist visa is very short (three to five minutes), and ONLY the applicant (the Filipina) is allowed to be inside the embassy for the interview (there are a couple of exceptions to this, but most Filipinas who are applying will NOT qualify. Therefore, she is on her own. The applicant will normally be given NO opportunity to show all (or any) of the supporting documentation she has with her that shows her intent to return to the Philippines (such as her husband's 13A visa, title for their house and vehicle, bank statements, employment, anything).

 

There are usually only a couple of questions asked. One of those questions will be, "Are you married to or engaged to an American citizen?" If the answer is yes, there probably won't be any more questions. The consular officer will complete the process and hand the applicant a slip of paper that tells her she has been denied for failure to show beyond the shadow of a doubt that she will return to the Philippines. Then, she is told to leave the building. There are NO appeals and the American citizen can't even get into the embassy to talk with a supervisor. I know. I've been there.

 

Second, NO fraud is committed by using an immigration visa as a tourist visa. There is no place in the application or interview where the applicant has to swear that they are planning to reside in the US. It asks for a contact phone number and an address where mail can be sent. It does NOT state that the applicant must stay there. Unlike the US tourist visa, with the spousal visa, there is a 99% chance the visa will be approved (unless she has a health issue that keeps her out of the US). In addition, the spouse is allowed to accompany her through the entire process. He is there for the interview, and the consular officer will likely even ask him some questions. However, NONE of the questions asked deals with intent to stay in the US, so NO fraud could possibly be committed.

 

What happens if the recipient returns to the Philippines? Nothing happens really. She is considered out-of-status on the spousal visa, but unlike being out-of-status on a tourist visa, no laws are broken. There is nothing that says she can't return to the Philippines. I know. I talked with the Consul and the Embassy BEFORE we did it, and I have also talked to them since we returned. There is no problem with what we did, and there is no black mark next to my wife's name. When she returns in the future to apply for another visa, her being out-of-status on a spousal visa will NOT affect her chances of getting that visa.

 

There IS one thing that WILL affect her chances of getting a US tourist visa in the future though. That is surrendering her green card while it is still valid. That may be done at any time while the green card is still in effect. When she surrenders the green card, Homeland Security gives her a report that states she voluntarily surrendered it. If, at a later time, we want to reapply for a US tourist visa, that Homeland Security report serves as prima facia evidence that she WILL return to the Philippines after her trip. After all, she already had the right to stay in the US because of her spousal visa and green card...but didn't. When the report is combined with a letter from the American spouse explaining what they want to do in the US, instead of a 1% chance of approval for a tourist visa, the chance of approval is more like 90%. It is still not a sure thing, but the odds are overwhelmingly in your favor.

 

While there are no hard and fast rules for which applicants the consular officers decide to let into the US for any reason, there are some guidelines that they follow. It is best NOT to buck the odds, and if somebody still chooses to apply for a US tourist visa for their spouse or fiancé after they read this, then as far as I'm concerned, they have thrown their money away. Yes, there is a slim chance they will be successful, but it is VERY slim. The spousal visa is more expensive than the tourist visa. However, what is even more expensive is applying for and being denied a tourist visa and then having to turn right around and apply for a spousal visa. It is also a lot more time consuming because you have to get through both application processes. I have been there and done that, and I KNOW what I’m talking about.

Edited by Headshot
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Admin (Retired)
broden

one of the ways this forum is often at it's best isn't when people argue but rather when people post from their own experience, when many people post from their own experience and then let others read and decide from all the available information.

Link to post
Share on other sites
smokey

Well Larry in Dumaguete, you don't know what you're talking about. I've done it, and so have others. And if you think it's easy getting a permanent residency in the Philippines then you obviously know little about how things work and the amount of red tape involved.

 

Btw, don't feel bad about being misinformed on this subject, the US Mission also is poorly informed, I recall speaking with a supervisor in Passport office who insisted, much as you are, that this isn't possible. Unfortunately, people in the Passport Unit don't know as much as they think they do about who and who doesn't get Visitor's Visas. The Passport Office deals with US Passports, not visas for Filipinos.

 

Also, consider the logic, to argue that the spouse of a USC residing overseas should instead apply for immigrant visa would require committing immigration fraud as the USC is a foreign resident and there'd be no intent on the Filipino's part to reside in the USA presumably.

 

This is not the fastest or easiest way to get a Filipino to the USA, that'd probably be Fiance Visa, but the OP asked how to get a Tourist Visa -- and I answered.

 

 

 

your both right and your both wrong its always on a case by case.. my son did a K1 and it was DONE in 4 months... i did a IR 1 after being married 5 years and it took 1 year and 3 months.. its the difference in paperwork and physical ... my wife has to do the TB thing and that added 8 months my and her paperwork was not original that added 2 months .. as to a tourist visa i think its who you get in the interview as long as the paperwork is done right... I think if your married and have a acr and want to visit the us with your wife that helps a lot because you have an acr.. now many of my wife s cousins on the well to do side have gotten visa but most went on a tour first... and came back

Edited by smokey
Link to post
Share on other sites
shamgod41

What are you talking about out of context/misrepresent? The guy in your link did exactly what I did and just like me, and everyone else in the same boat, was awarded a Visa, as the direct quote indicates in perfectly clear language. And the other comments in that thread have nothing to do with permanent residents and tourist visas for Filipinos. I don't know why you posted a link that proves my point and refutes yours.

 

And Larry, I see you're attacking our group's NPO. A lot of people from several countries have spent time and money on this project -- the reefs are in fact endangered, maybe you don't know. I really wish you'd stay out of it, we're trying to do something positive for the Philippines and don't need someone like you, Larry from Dumagette, smearing it just because you can't handle someone you disagree with. You should be embarrassed. I bet you think you're pretty clever. You're not, you're malicious, reckless and destructive. Attacking a fledgling NPO trying to protect the reefs. Wow.

 

With regard to the other comments here. I am in full agreement that the Embassy is whimsical and capricious with regard to applying rules and regulations for visas. They're unpredictable. And it's what I dislike most about their operation, I can deal with high fees, long waits, rude guards, sluggish processing, arrogant clerks etc. But I wish they'd consistently adhere to their own black letter law. That's indeed the context of my claim that a USC with a permanent residency can in fact get a tourist visa for a spouse. I've done it, the guy in Larry's link did, and a lot of other people as well. I don't know anyone that tried failed, having said that, I'd wager everything I own that others HAVE been denied under similar circumstances. There is just so much randomness in the Mission's MO. But, again, though it might not be foolproof, it's a method that has worked for many people, including myself.

I still don't agree that it's wise and even legal to try and use an immigrant Visa to visit to the USA. The reasoning

here seems to be that the Visa App lacks questions about intent to stay in US permanently. Unfortunately there is more to the law than questions on an application. Even the Embassy site states: An immigrant visa is issued to a qualified person who has an approved petition based on a family or work relationship and who wishes to live in the U.S. permanently.

 

That's clear language, "Live in the US Permanently". If your intent is to vacation for 3 months you're in violation of the intent of the Immigrant Visa. Trying to split hairs by saying the application didn't ask about intent seem unwise. My Driver's License application didn't say I can't run over a Police Officer, but I don't think that'd be a good excuse to give a Judge. Also, there was the comment that "They never ask" in the interview. How do you know? What if they DO ask, do you lie? We've already established that Embassy officials take everything case by case and are pathologically capricious, you're taking a risk of law breaking. You're basically arming the embassy with a WMD to use on you and your spouse. I know, lots of people do it, but it's fundamentally dishonest because you are legally representing yourself as an immigrant when you are in fact intending to only visit. Visiting and immigrating are not the same thing.

Here are some more details on my experience in getting the wife a Tourist Visa. This is mere anecdote. YMMV as we've established. First, everyone, including people in the Embassy Passport Office (a supervisor) insisted we would NOT be granted a Tourist Visa. We were wasting our time etc. I had a friend in Cebu that used to work in old Cebu Consulate, he was the only one that said, with absolute certainty, that it's a rubber stamp. He said "They have no choice". Day of the interview, never been so nervous, we had a stack of docs and photos 3" thick. And contrary to what's stated above, I was in fact permitted to attend the interview. Here's how the interview went, it took 45 seconds, the Agent said "Oh you're Resident?" I say "Yes", Agent picks up the my Residency document for 5 seconds, says "Okay we'll mail you the Visa". That's it. This Agent knew the law and indeed rubber stamped it. However, I've been involved in other misadventures with Embassy Visa Agents who clearly did NOT know the law as well as they should have . It could have been a different story with a different agent. YMMV. I doubt anyone here has hard data on success/failure rates of this method.

So what's a guy do? If it was me, I'd do everything possible to get through to someone in the Visa Section (not a Secretary) and lay out your plan and follow their advice. If you get shut down at the interview, you can appeal these things through your congressman, I've done that too. They don't ignore inquiries from Congressmen.

In general, the system sucks because it's random.

Best advice: Make your own jacket. Don't use my method just because it worked for me and others, don't use the Immigrant Visa method just because others here have done it. Make the calls, get names, for all I know, the embassy as a wink wink policy with regards to the Immigrant Visa method or perhaps they instituted Operation Visa Crackdown. This is what you need to find out.

Edited by shamgod41
Link to post
Share on other sites
shadow

What are you talking about out of context/misrepresent? The guy in your link did exactly what I did and just like me, and everyone else in the same boat, was awarded a Visa, as the direct quote indicates in perfectly clear language. And the other comments in that thread have nothing to do with permanent residents and tourist visas for Filipinos. I don't know why you posted a link that proves my point and refutes yours.

 

And Larry, I see you're attacking our group's NPO. A lot of people from several countries have spent time and money on this project -- the reefs are in fact endangered, maybe you don't know. I really wish you'd stay out of it, we're trying to do something positive for the Philippines and don't need someone like you, Larry from Dumagette, smearing it just because you can't handle someone you disagree with. You should be embarrassed. I bet you think you're pretty clever. You're not, you're malicious, reckless and destructive. Attacking a fledgling NPO trying to protect the reefs. Wow.

 

With regard to the other comments here. I am in full agreement that the Embassy is whimsical and capricious with regard to applying rules and regulations for visas. They're unpredictable. And it's what I dislike most about their operation, I can deal with high fees, long waits, rude guards, sluggish processing, arrogant clerks etc. But I wish they'd consistently adhere to their own black letter law. That's indeed the context of my claim that a USC with a permanent residency can in fact get a tourist visa for a spouse. I've done it, the guy in Larry's link did, and a lot of other people as well. I don't know anyone that tried failed, having said that, I'd wager everything I own that others HAVE been denied under similar circumstances. There is just so much randomness in the Mission's MO. But, again, though it might not be foolproof, it's a method that has worked for many people, including myself.

I still don't agree that it's wise and even legal to try and use an immigrant Visa to visit to the USA. The reasoning

here seems to be that the Visa App lacks questions about intent to stay in US permanently. Unfortunately there is more to the law than questions on an application. Even the Embassy site states: An immigrant visa is issued to a qualified person who has an approved petition based on a family or work relationship and who wishes to live in the U.S. permanently.

 

That's clear language, "Live in the US Permanently". If your intent is to vacation for 3 months you're in violation of the intent of the Immigrant Visa. Trying to split hairs by saying the application didn't ask about intent seem unwise. My Driver's License application didn't say I can't run over a Police Officer, but I don't think that'd be a good excuse to give a Judge. Also, there was the comment that "They never ask" in the interview. How do you know? What if they DO ask, do you lie? We've already established that Embassy officials take everything case by case and are pathologically capricious, you're taking a risk of law breaking. You're basically arming the embassy with a WMD to use on you and your spouse. I know, lots of people do it, but it's fundamentally dishonest because you are legally representing yourself as an immigrant when you are in fact intending to only visit. Visiting and immigrating are not the same thing.

Here are some more details on my experience in getting the wife a Tourist Visa. This is mere anecdote. YMMV as we've established. First, everyone, including people in the Embassy Passport Office (a supervisor) insisted we would NOT be granted a Tourist Visa. We were wasting our time etc. I had a friend in Cebu that used to work in old Cebu Consulate, he was the only one that said, with absolute certainty, that it's a rubber stamp. He said "They have no choice". Day of the interview, never been so nervous, we had a stack of docs and photos 3" thick. And contrary to what's stated above, I was in fact permitted to attend the interview. Here's how the interview went, it took 45 seconds, the Agent said "Oh you're Resident?" I say "Yes", Agent picks up the my Residency document for 5 seconds, says "Okay we'll mail you the Visa". That's it. This Agent knew the law and indeed rubber stamped it. However, I've been involved in other misadventures with Embassy Visa Agents who clearly did NOT know the law as well as they should have . It could have been a different story with a different agent. YMMV. I doubt anyone here has hard data on success/failure rates of this method.

So what's a guy do? If it was me, I'd do everything possible to get through to someone in the Visa Section (not a Secretary) and lay out your plan and follow their advice. If you get shut down at the interview, you can appeal these things through your congressman, I've done that too. They don't ignore inquiries from Congressmen.

In general, the system sucks because it's random.

Best advice: Make your own jacket. Don't use my method just because it worked for me and others, don't use the Immigrant Visa method just because others here have done it. Make the calls, get names, for all I know, the embassy as a wink wink policy with regards to the Immigrant Visa method or perhaps they instituted Operation Visa Crackdown. This is what you need to find out.

 

Obviously you cannot read your own post. Your "quote" was altered from the original to make it look like the OP (Lakan) was successful in obtaining a visa. He was not, and as far as I can tell, never even applied as yet.

 

I will respond no further to your posts, they are ignorance personified. In fact I won't even be reading them, just as I didn't bother to read this one after the first sentence or two.

 

Have a nice day.

 

Larry in Dumaguete

Edited by shadow
Link to post
Share on other sites
SkyMan

your both right and your both wrong its always on a case by case.. my son did a K1 and it was DONE in 4 months... i did a IR 1 after being married 5 years and it took 1 year and 3 months.. its the difference in paperwork and physical ... my wife has to do the TB thing and that added 8 months my and her paperwork was not original that added 2 months .. as to a tourist visa i think its who you get in the interview as long as the paperwork is done right... I think if your married and have a acr and want to visit the us with your wife that helps a lot because you have an acr.. now many of my wife s cousins on the well to do side have gotten visa but most went on a tour first... and came back

Does this have anything to do with a tourist visa? Ya know, the subject?
What are you talking about out of context/misrepresent? The guy in your link did exactly what I did and just like me, and everyone else in the same boat, was awarded a Visa, as the direct quote indicates in perfectly clear language. And the other comments in that thread have nothing to do with permanent residents and tourist visas for Filipinos. I don't know why you posted a link that proves my point and refutes yours.
I'm the guy you misquoted. Looks like you pieced together parts of 3 or more posts with mine in the middle to get the outcome you want. Yes, my wife applied for a tourist visa and I have a 13A and she got it first try. If you follow the advice I give here:

http://www.livinginc..._50#entry509985

you have a better chance but it's still quite a gamble. Your choice. As the cost of a tourist visa is about a tenth the cost of a spousal visa, it may be worth a shot or two for some. Others would rather take the guarenteed spousal and not bother with the gamble.

And Larry, I see you're attacking our group's NPO. A lot of people from several countries have spent time and money on this project -- the reefs are in fact endangered, maybe you don't know. I really wish you'd stay out of it, we're trying to do something positive for the Philippines and don't need someone like you, Larry from Dumagette, smearing it just because you can't handle someone you disagree with. You should be embarrassed. I bet you think you're pretty clever. You're not, you're malicious, reckless and destructive. Attacking a fledgling NPO trying to protect the reefs. Wow.
Left field?
Even the Embassy site states: An immigrant visa is issued to a qualified person who has an approved petition based on a family or work relationship and who wishes to live in the U.S. permanently.
Correct but it does not say it is NOT to be used to just visit. I'm sure the DOS would be quite happy if everyone who came to the US on a spousal or any other type visa would leave. Also, many filipinas who move to the US permanently change there minds and there's nothing wrong with that. You will not find a case of any legal action taken against anyone for leaving the US after arriving on a spousal visa. Can you tell me where it says someone arriving on a spousal visa must stay for X months or years? Can you tell me where it says it is illegal to change your mind?

 

There is a name for people that argue with everyone on a forum simple to make an argument.... :troll:

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
smokey

Does this have anything to do with a tourist visa? Ya know, the subject?I'm the guy you misquoted. Looks like you pieced together parts of 3 or more posts with mine in the middle to get the outcome you want. Yes, my wife applied for a tourist visa and I have a 13A and she got it first try. If you follow the advice I give here:

http://www.livinginc..._50#entry509985

you have a better chance but it's still quite a gamble. Your choice. As the cost of a tourist visa is about a tenth the cost of a spousal visa, it may be worth a shot or two for some. Others would rather take the guarenteed spousal and not bother with the gamble.

Left field?

Correct but it does not say it is NOT to be used to just visit. I'm sure the DOS would be quite happy if everyone who came to the US on a spousal or any other type visa would leave. Also, many filipinas who move to the US permanently change there minds and there's nothing wrong with that. You will not find a case of any legal action taken against anyone for leaving the US after arriving on a spousal visa. Can you tell me where it says someone arriving on a spousal visa must stay for X months or years? Can you tell me where it says it is illegal to change your mind?

 

There is a name for people that argue with everyone on a forum simple to make an argument.... :troll:

 

 

 

 

take a stress pill no matter what type of visa you apply for you still have to have an interview and that is the luck of the draw on who you will get.....all the this is the way and this is the way means very little unless you get a good interview.. period...

Edited by smokey
Link to post
Share on other sites
senseless

What would be the easiest way (through an agent, lawyer, online, etc?) for my Filipina friend to get a tourist visa to visit the Diseny World?

 

She has a house, car, sufficient money in the bank (probably more than an average US household :D) and a professional license from DOT but no job or tax return.

 

Any advice will be appreciated.

 

NB: She is not a teenager ;) will be 30 yo this year...

 

Probably easier to become a citizen.

Link to post
Share on other sites
shamgod41

Correct but it does not say it is NOT to be used to just visit. I'm sure the DOS would be quite happy if everyone who came to the US on a spousal or any other type visa would leave. Also, many filipinas who move to the US permanently change there minds and there's nothing wrong with that. You will not find a case of any legal action taken against anyone for leaving the US after arriving on a spousal visa. Can you tell me where it says someone arriving on a spousal visa must stay for X months or years? Can you tell me where it says it is illegal to change your mind?

 

There is a name for people that argue with everyone on a forum simple to make an argume\nt....

 

I see you guys are more interested in attacking me and namecalling than discussing the issue.

 

Here's the thing Skyman, you don't get to speak for the Federal Government. You say you're "Sure the government is

happy is immigrant visa holders leave'. Really? Where's your evidence? This is classic bad internet advice. The text is perfectly clear, immigration visas are for immigrants and tourist visas are for tourists. Your game of armchair lawyer/linguistic coach could get someone in lot of trouble. You're telling people to lie by trying to parse clear language in to something that fits your needs. A safer bet is FOLLOW THE RULES and not play semantic games. What is a person supposed to say if an immigration officer asks a spouse "Do you plan to live in the USA?' You can't say they don't ask that, they can ask you anything they want.

And how do you know legal action has never been taken? You have access to all legal records? Basing your case on conjecture is reckless. Telling people to lie is irresponsible.

 

I still don't see how I'm misquoting you, you're a permanent resident, and you Fil spouse got a tourist visa -- which is my point and you corroborated it. You said " Yes, my wife applied for a tourist visa and I have a 13A and she got it first try. "

 

 

Anyway both you and Larry of Dumagette have both admitted that my method works, so I don't know why you keep arguing and insulting when all you have to do is read your own words. You're both on the record validating my suggestion that a viable means to a tourist visa for a Filipino spouse is through Permanent Residency for a USC.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

I'm the guy you misquoted. Looks like you pieced together parts of 3 or more posts with mine in the middle to get the outcome you want. Yes, my wife applied for a tourist visa and I have a 13A and she got it first try. If you follow the advice I give here:

http://www.livinginc..._50#entry509985 you have a better chance but it's still quite a gamble. Your choice. As the cost of a tourist visa is about a tenth the cost of a spousal visa, it may be worth a shot or two for some. Others would rather take the guarenteed spousal and not bother with the gamble.

 

I agree that going the route you did (with the letter) increased your wife's odd of getting a tourist visa. However, I think time of day and the mood of the consular officers had a lot to do with the final outcome. Your letter (that your wife handed the consular officer along with the application) made them laugh (the consular officer even took it to show his supervisor). They were then willing to look at her supporting documentation. Most applicants don't have that advantage, and just follow the consular officer's instructions. Doing so is a sure recipe for denial. The tourist visa is a huge gamble that offers little chance of success the first go-around. The spousal visa is almost a sure thing. Yes...it costs more, but not as much as having to apply twice (once for a tourist visa and once for a spousal visa after the tourist visa is denied) in order to obtain a visa.

 

Correct but it does not say it is NOT to be used to just visit. I'm sure the DOS would be quite happy if everyone who came to the US on a spousal or any other type visa would leave. Also, many filipinas who move to the US permanently change there minds and there's nothing wrong with that. You will not find a case of any legal action taken against anyone for leaving the US after arriving on a spousal visa. Can you tell me where it says someone arriving on a spousal visa must stay for X months or years? Can you tell me where it says it is illegal to change your mind?

 

You are absolutely correct. Like I said, I have talked with people both at the consulate and the embassy (both before and after we went to the US on a spousal visa), and have been told EVERY time that going this route will cause NO problems for future visas. In fact, we were told that getting the visa, taking the trip, returning to the Philippines and surrendering the green card voluntarily substantially strengthens our case for a tourist visa the next time we apply. We are not planning to go to the US with a spousal visa again for another 14 years when we take my daughter to the US for high school. My wife will get her US citizenship at that time, and then we will come back to the Philippines to live again.

 

There is a name for people that argue with everyone on a forum simply to make an argument.... :troll:

 

That is exactly how I read it too. He is a troll and a shit-stirrer. He just wants to throw out some misinformation to confuse those who want to understand the truth before laying down their money,

Edited by Headshot
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..

Capture.JPG

I Understand...