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Bill H

Pump Boat Rebuild

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Bill H

While I wait for the engine problem to be sorted out, we hauled my first boat out of the water to make a few changes. This is a boat I bought used last August, when we bought it; we took care of all the obvious problems and put a new engine in. After 8 continuous months in the water and nearly daily use, we decided to pull her out and correct the things I really didn't like about her, namely, her lack of freeboard.

 

On a few trips to Negros, we took on more water than I would have liked and the seas were not all that rough, so I decided we'd add another foot of freeboard. That was the plan. So, we began removing everything that was in the way in preparation of adding the freeboard and the first dry rot appears. I told my guys to remove any wood that was not solid and this is how we ended up.post-8579-0-97014800-1336213775_thumb.jpgpost-8579-0-48976100-1336213809_thumb.jpg

 

As you can see most of both the bow and stern are gone. The plywood used in this boat is the typical 3 laminate marine ply and it was seriously delaminating in many areas. The logitudinals and frames are Karot wood, which should hold up better than it did. I mostly blame poor design and complete lack of wood preservatives for this failure.

 

Here's a view of one of the longitudinals. The crack came about as we were removing it as the wood was so badly rotten. post-8579-0-75341900-1336214014_thumb.jpg

 

Now we're in the process of fitting new longitudinals and frames, adding about a foot of freeboard in the process. Due to the angle of the frames, we'll also gain a little bit of beam at the deck level.

 

post-8579-0-69331400-1336214195_thumb.jpgpost-8579-0-38931900-1336214229_thumb.jpgpost-8579-0-40155000-1336214274_thumb.jpg

 

While we're at it, we're also going to convert the 12hp air cooled diesel to electric start so we can add electric lighting for night fishing which we'll run off the new battery we'll be installing.

Edited by Bill H
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thebob

Wow that isn't so good.

 

What plywood are you using?

 

Santa Clara or Tuff?

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Bill H

Wow that isn't so good.

 

What plywood are you using?

 

Santa Clara or Tuff?

 

The plywood we removed was just a local 3ply brand unknown, but certainly not TuffPly. We'll be replacing all the plywood with TuffPly. We'll probably use two layers of 5mm (T55) laminated together. I don't want to remove much more plywood, it's about all that's holding this old girl together (and she's only 5 years old!) Once we've stipped all the wood down, we'll coat everything with laminating epoxy to protect the wood, new and old. Then epoxy paint on top of that before applying the new plywood.

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fanboat

Do you have a quiet muffler installed?I had an 11 hp honda motor on my boat and no muffler!did not make for a nice ride.

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Bill H

Do you have a quiet muffler installed?I had an 11 hp honda motor on my boat and no muffler!did not make for a nice ride.

 

Yup, have muffler and long extended exhaust pipe to vent fumes overboard. It's not "that" loud, but, it is after all a diesel. Once we re-install we may add more sound supression....we'll see.

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Ricbak

Bill

 

are you treating the wood with copper napthate or anything else to prevent rot or just relying on epoxy?

 

 

Ricbak

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Jimone

The light sounds like a good idea, ideal for squid fishing at night, do you have room for two batteries ?? I had two in my last boat incsase we run one flat with the light, and other add ons and could isolate one battery just for the starter...

post-3349-0-36320200-1336345018_thumb.png

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thebob
We'll probably use two layers of 5mm (T55) laminated together.

 

How are you laminating this? You can use an old ref/freezer compressor and vacuum bag them. That way you can fill all of the voids and save a lot of money on epoxy.

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Bill H

Bill

 

are you treating the wood with copper napthate or anything else to prevent rot or just relying on epoxy?

 

 

Ricbak

 

I have been relying on thick coats of epoxy only. In theory that's all you need, then again, over kill is not always bad. The big problem is finding the copper napthate. When I've asked my supplier in the past, I got a blank stare. What is it called in Cebuano? Do you know?

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Bill H

How are you laminating this? You can use an old ref/freezer compressor and vacuum bag them. That way you can fill all of the voids and save a lot of money on epoxy.

 

Generally we've been using a West type system using fasteners. Vacuum bagging works well on flat sheets, but we're making compound curves which really lend themselves to multiple thin sheets, but not vacuum bagging. Vacuum bagging is tricky, if you don't get enough epoxy there are voids and voids are very bad. I feel better spending a tad more for epoxy and applying it a little thicker to be sure of good coveage. We also always apply to both sides of the wood to be bonded so we have a wet on wet situation.

 

The production glass boat folks hav turned vacuum bagging into an art, but they are building hundreds of boats at a time and can afford to invest in that technology, they also use very robust molds made or reinforced wih steel to take the forces generated by the vacuum. We don't have that luxury here and I really don't think much of glass boats anyway.

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thebob

Interesting. I've often thought that cylinder molding would be the ideal way to build a banka.

 

You might find this interesting.

 

http://www.multihulldesigns.com/pdf/cm33.pdf

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Bill H

Interesting. I've often thought that cylinder molding would be the ideal way to build a banka.

 

You might find this interesting.

 

http://www.multihull...om/pdf/cm33.pdf

 

Thank you Bob, that was interesting. The boats I'm building are not traditional multihulls where every ounce counts. We're building robust working boats that are able to take some abuse. There is a place in the world for vacuum bagging, but for our application I don't think it would do much for us. Building the mold is not an inconsequential cost. If we ever develop a customer base such that we are building dozens of hulls, then one could justify the expense of building a good mold, but for one off boats like we're building now, I just don't see it makes much sense for us.

 

We continue to gravitate towards building metal boats using modern CAD/CAM systems. I'm also looking at doing a floating restaurant out of concrete. Life is never dull here.

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thebob

 

We continue to gravitate towards building metal boats using modern CAD/CAM systems. I'm also looking at doing a floating restaurant out of concrete. Life is never dull here.

 

A floating bar/resto would be great. Mooring is the main problem.

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Ricbak

If as you say you are building strong workboats why not use some woven fibreglass on the bottom sides?

 

As for epoxy paint what do you see as the great advantage?

 

I talked to a Cebu expat who has owned a number of banca boats and known a lot of expats who have owned one, he maintains that a lot of guys make the mistake of trying to Westernize the banca and by doing that add to the cost and introduce numerous extra items that fail or require more maintenance. He advocates using House paint for the hulls but to haul out the boat regularly and recoat at least annually. His concern with using coats of epoxy over the wood is that it prevents the wood drying out if there are areas that are breeched and become water logged.

 

One thing that worries me with native built bancas is that they are not built with any watertight flotation compartments..........some may argue thats not necessary when you have bamboo outriggers.

 

Sorry for all the questions, I am interested in building my own boat sometime and this is a great oppurtunity t learn

 

Thanks

Ricbak

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Bill H

A floating bar/resto would be great. Mooring is the main problem.

 

Well, actually the mooring points are the easiest part of the project, it's the permits that can bite you in the ass! I like concrete boats for some applications (this being one of them) since if they are built right you can leave them in the water for a very long time without worries. The key of course is building right. As for permitting, I guess like everything else here it all depends on who you know (or perhaps better stated, who you've paid off.)

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