Jump to content

USA Tourist Visa for Asawa?


Recommended Posts

I'm wondering if anyone has gotten a tourist visa for their Filipino spouse recently. Most of the American expats I've talked to say they have been rejected. I only know of one guy who got his wife a tourist visa...and that was on the second try the first was rejected.

 

I'd like to hear about your experience either way.

 

Thanks

 

lakan

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 55
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Headshot

    12

  • shadow

    9

  • SkyMan

    6

  • MattFromGA

    4

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I've posted this before but my wife was approved first try, no problem. I guess we're in the 1%. On paper, Headshot and I are almost identical. Similar ages of us and our wives. Married about the

That's the guy that rates arriving passenger's T&A and decides if they are hot enough to enter the US. The women's orgs are going to pitch a bitch fit when they find out about it.

I can understand the US embassy employees being very strict and denying the average Filipino a tourist visa unless they meet all of the requirements for a tourist visa. Even then it should be viewed o

Headshot

I'm wondering if anyone has gotten a tourist visa for their Filipino spouse recently. Most of the American expats I've talked to say they have been rejected. I only know of one guy who got his wife a tourist visa...and that was on the second try the first was rejected.

 

I'd like to hear about your experience either way.

 

Thanks

 

lakan

 

My wife was rejected out-of-hand for a US tourist visa. We reapplied for a US spousal (immigration) visa and her visa was approved. The embassy in Manila has the mindset that ALL Filipinas who are married to US citizens are lying through their teeth, and will stay illegally in the US after their tourist visa expires. Because the US embassy rejected her tourist visa, my wife was never able to meet my mother. My mother died before we were able to get the spousal visa. I will never forgive my government for that. At least my wife was able to meet my father and the rest of my family when we went to visit last year. Now, we are back living on Cebu.

 

The other difference between applying for a tourist visa and a spousal visa is how they treat the US citizen. With a tourist visa, they will not let the US citizen enter the embassy (probably because they know he is going to blow a gasket when they reject his wife's tourist visa application for no reason). With the spousal visa, the husband is allowed to go through the whole process with his wife. They are friendly and courteous the whole time.

 

For spouses of US citizens, 99% of tourist visas are rejected, while 99% of spousal visas are approved at the US Embassy in Manila. Since they have a mindset that ALL Filipinas want to go to the US to live, the application for a tourist visa goes against their preconceived ideas at the embassy, so they refuse to believe it is truthful. My wife was rejected because she couldn't prove she had a reason to return to the Philippines...even though she had plenty of documentation that showed that we have established a permanent life here (including owning land and a home). They never even asked to see any documentation, and once they stamped the application as rejected, the interview was OVER.

Link to post
Share on other sites
shadow

I'm wondering if anyone has gotten a tourist visa for their Filipino spouse recently. Most of the American expats I've talked to say they have been rejected. I only know of one guy who got his wife a tourist visa...and that was on the second try the first was rejected.

 

I'd like to hear about your experience either way.

 

Thanks

 

lakan

 

If you can show strong proof that your home is here in the Philippines, she may have a chance. Have you built a home or business here? Have you been here for several years? Do you have a 13A visa? If not, it will likely be a waste of time and money.

 

Larry in Dumaguete

Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

If you can show strong proof that your home is here in the Philippines, she may have a chance. Have you built a home or business here? Have you been here for several years? Do you have a 13A visa? If not, it will likely be a waste of time and money.

 

Larry in Dumaguete

 

Larry, we had all of those things. It was still a waste of time and money. They had decided to reject her before she even got to the interview. No chance was given to show the evidence she brought with her to the interview.

Edited by Headshot
Link to post
Share on other sites
shadow

Larry, we had all of those things. It was still a waste of time and money. They had decided to reject her before she even got to the interview. No chance was given to show the evidence she brought with her to the interview.

 

 

Yes, I know. Most are rejected even when all that is presented. Without it though, it is hopeless.

 

Larry in Dumaguete

Link to post
Share on other sites
SkyMan

I'm wondering if anyone has gotten a tourist visa for their Filipino spouse recently. Most of the American expats I've talked to say they have been rejected. I only know of one guy who got his wife a tourist visa...and that was on the second try the first was rejected.

 

I'd like to hear about your experience either way.

 

Thanks

 

lakan

I've posted this before but my wife was approved first try, no problem. I guess we're in the 1%. On paper, Headshot and I are almost identical. Similar ages of us and our wives. Married about the same length of time, both with 13As, established roots here, retired AF, etc.The one difference was that, knowing I would probably not be allowed to enter the embassy with her, I drafted a one page letter explaining why we were going to the US and that the trip would be about a month but certainly not more then 45 days. I mentioned we were planning to take a cruise so the visa would need to be multiple entry, etc. I used my military (retired) signature block but I have no idea if that made any difference. I gave my wife copies and told her that if anyone asks for any paperwork from her to put a copy of the letter on top. She did that at the interview and the interviewer read it. Then took it back to her boss who also read it. Apparently they laughed about something though I'm really not sure what was funny. I did include a bit that I was considering having a restaurant in Cebu and I wanted my wife to see what real restaurant service was like. I was dead serious but perhaps that was it. Anyway, the interviewer returned and asked maybe 4 simple questions. How long have you been married? Like that. Then she asked to see a copy of my 13A and she was approved.

 

One thing that strikes me about Tourist visas is that they are supposed to based on her ties with the Philippines (and lack of ties in the US.) And yet those types of things are never requested. The application is just bio data with the one exception they do ask what other countries you've visited. It's been a couple years but I don't think they ask about employment or finances or even a blank for what proof do you have you'll return to the Philippines? And then, you might send your wife in with a huge stack of such information but the interviewer will never ask for it. They just take the application and ask a few questions and deny it. I wonder if by, "Please give me your application", they are asking for the application itself and any back up documentation. It just seems like one of the questions they should ask all applicants is for proof of ties to the Philippines via backup documents. I think the interviewers are just too lazy to look at the docs and don't want to be responsible for deciding if they amount to sufficient ties. And besides that there certainly seems to be a degree of randomnous in the approvals.

 

The embassy in Manila has the mindset that ALL Filipinas who are married to US citizens are lying through their teeth, and will stay illegally in the US after their tourist visa expires.
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I've posted this before but my wife was approved first try, no problem. I guess we're in the 1%. On paper, Headshot and I are almost identical. Similar ages of us and our wives. Married about the same length of time, both with 13As, established roots here, retired AF, etc.The one difference was that, knowing I would probably not be allowed to enter the embassy with her, I drafted a one page letter explaining why we were going to the US and that the trip would be about a month but certainly not more then 45 days. I mentioned we were planning to take a cruise so the visa would need to be multiple entry, etc. I used my military (retired) signature block but I have no idea if that made any difference. I gave my wife copies and told her that if anyone asks for any paperwork from her to put a copy of the letter on top. She did that at the interview and the interviewer read it. Then took it back to her boss who also read it. Apparently they laughed about something though I'm really not sure what was funny. I did include a bit that I was considering having a restaurant in Cebu and I wanted my wife to see what real restaurant service was like. I was dead serious but perhaps that was it. Anyway, the interviewer returned and asked maybe 4 simple questions. How long have you been married? Like that. Then she asked to see a copy of my 13A and she was approved.

 

One thing that strikes me about Tourist visas is that they are supposed to based on her ties with the Philippines (and lack of ties in the US.) And yet those types of things are never requested. The application is just bio data with the one exception they do ask what other countries you've visited. It's been a couple years but I don't think they ask about employment or finances or even a blank for what proof do you have you'll return to the Philippines? And then, you might send your wife in with a huge stack of such information but the interviewer will never ask for it. They just take the application and ask a few questions and deny it. I wonder if by, "Please give me your application", they are asking for the application itself and any back up documentation. It just seems like one of the questions they should ask all applicants is for proof of ties to the Philippines via backup documents. I think the interviewers are just too lazy to look at the docs and don't want to be responsible for deciding if they amount to sufficient ties. And besides that there certainly seems to be a degree of randomnous in the approvals.

 

I heard similar things about Germans applying for tourist visas for their GF or wife's. If you go beyond what is asked and even explain something the didn't ask, the chances of approval are much higher. If you and your wife come over as honest, there is a much better chance of approval rather than showing land and money etc.

 

I know it's Canada but my then fiance was also rejected a tourist visa, it is not a shame.

 

The US btw doesn't allow Canadian permanent residents to visit without a visa, you have to apply and pay $200, some get rejected for no reason, even if they only want to go to Disneyland with the family. Canada allows entry to US green card holders without visa.

Edited by ckfm
Link to post
Share on other sites

Generally, fuggedabout a tourist visa -- too much of an uphill battle. After being rejected, I visited the consul for a friendly chat. He was very kind and explained that the problem is that my wife is married to a US citizen. Should something happen to me while in the US, or -- strange as it may seem -- if my wife liked life in the US better than in the Phils, they would have no recourse, could not deport her.

 

I have 13A status here, own a house and a vehicle, all my wife's relatives are here, we have travelled all over Europe on a Schengen visa, etc. None of that matters. The consul told me to write a cover letter explaining the circumstances of why we want to visit and why must return to the Phils, but even then it is iffy.

 

The problem with the spousal visa is that you must remain in the US until your green card is issued and that can take a year or more.If you don't want to live there, this is not an option.

Edited by Ungaro
Link to post
Share on other sites
shadow

Generally, fuggedabout a tourist visa -- too much of an uphill battle. After being rejected, I visited the consul for a friendly chat. He was very kind and explained that the problem is that my wife is married to a US citizen. Should something happen to me while in the US, or -- strange as it may seem -- if my wife liked life in the US better than in the Phils, they would have no recourse, could not deport her.

 

I have 13A status here, own a house and a vehicle, all my wife's relatives are here, we have travelled all over Europe on a Schengen visa, etc. None of that matters. The consul told me to write a cover letter explaining the circumstances of why we want to visit and why must return to the Phils, but even then it is iffy.

 

The problem with the spousal visa is that you must remain in the US until your green card is issued and that can take a year or more.If you don't want to live there, this is not an option.

 

When one enters on a spousal visa, the green card is already processed and will arrive in the mail in a few weeks. However, if one does not spend more time in the US than overseas, the green card will likely be revoked. On a brighter note, once the green card has been revoked, the applicant has already proven they don't want to immigrate, so getting a tourist visa gets much easier.

 

Larry in Dumaguete

Link to post
Share on other sites
tomaw

 

 

 

Yes, I know. Most are rejected even when all that is presented. Without it though, it is hopeless.

 

Larry in Dumaguete

.....................If your legally married to her why bother with a tourist visa? Even if the two of you bought a house in The Philippines and plan on living there the rest of your lives, get the Spousal Visa. Going back will be easy once she is in The U.S.
Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

.....................If your legally married to her why bother with a tourist visa? Even if the two of you bought a house in The Philippines and plan on living there the rest of your lives, get the Spousal Visa. Going back will be easy once she is in The U.S.

 

On the face of it, the tourist visa is very attractive. It is only half the cost of a spousal visa. Unfortunately, it is a crap shoot (with really horrible odds). We ended up getting a spousal visa after my wife was rejected for a tourist visa. However, that isn't without risks as well. My wife's spousal visa (CR-1) is still in force, but since we only spent a little over a month there before going back to the Philippines, she likely cannot re-enter the US right now (she could be turned away at the port of entry for staying out of the country too long). If I were to require surgery right now, it is a huge risk that she might not be allowed back into the US. If that were to happen, it would be a black mark on her record, since there is a question on the visa application as to whether you have ever been refused entry. Once the visa is expired, then we can start over again. It would have been nice if the US Embassy actually looked at each visa application on its own merits...and NOT filtered through some preconceived idea about what Filipinas want.

Link to post
Share on other sites
cebubird

Bill, I am curious about this since the US Immigration dept doesnt know when your wife left-how can they know she has been out of country too long?

My wife was there on a K-1, and we never applied for change of status, and overstayed the visa by 10 months. When we left, we didn't go thru any immigration process-she just showed her Philippine passport and there was no questions about anything. So, as far as USCIS knows she might still be in the US.

Link to post
Share on other sites
shadow

.....................If your legally married to her why bother with a tourist visa? Even if the two of you bought a house in The Philippines and plan on living there the rest of your lives, get the Spousal Visa. Going back will be easy once she is in The U.S.

 

A spousal visa (IR1,CR1) is a visa to LIVE in the US. If an admitting immigration officer determines the green card holder is using it as a tourist visa, and cannot prove they intend to LIVE in the US, it will be revoked.

 

The cost of processing a spousal visa is $1000+, the cost of filing a tourist visa application is $140.

 

Larry in Dumaguete

Link to post
Share on other sites
shadow

Bill, I am curious about this since the US Immigration dept doesnt know when your wife left-how can they know she has been out of country too long?

My wife was there on a K-1, and we never applied for change of status, and overstayed the visa by 10 months. When we left, we didn't go thru any immigration process-she just showed her Philippine passport and there was no questions about anything. So, as far as USCIS knows she might still be in the US.

 

Bill, first, they do know when she left. Second, if you married within the initial the 90 days stipulated on the K1, she abided by the terms of her visa and did not overstay. She was simply "out of status", which is not an offense.

 

Larry in Dumaguete

Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

Bill, I am curious about this since the US Immigration dept doesnt know when your wife left-how can they know she has been out of country too long?

My wife was there on a K-1, and we never applied for change of status, and overstayed the visa by 10 months. When we left, we didn't go thru any immigration process-she just showed her Philippine passport and there was no questions about anything. So, as far as USCIS knows she might still be in the US.

 

When we left the US, we didn't even go through US Immigration (that is typical). The only place you show your passport is at the airline ticket counter. Unfortunately, when we arrived in the Philippines, Philippine Immigration stamped her passport with an entry date. That would be a little difficult to explain to US Immigration on re-entry. In addition, we have gone through the entire CRBA, SSN and passport process for my daughter here in Cebu. It would be a bit difficult to say at this point that she had been in the US the whole time when she was here raising her hand and swearing that the statements on my daughter's applications were true. I wouldn't even try.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..

Capture.JPG

I Understand...