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KennyF

Teaching your kids English in RP

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KennyF

I don't have any kids so this doesn't apply to me, but I have often thought that there must be a better way to educate youngsters than exists in RP schools.

 

Here's an idea that I believe you mums and dads could look at.

 

A native English speaking teacher working for the many language schools in Cebu city earns around 40,000 pesos a month. I personally know two in Cebu city, an Australian guy and a Kiwi girl neither with more than western high school education, and there are literally hundreds of western teachers on just such a salary in Cambodia too, mostly young by the way, mid twenties or thereabout.

 

So here we have professional teachers willing to work full time for 40,000 pesos a month.

 

Would it not be possible for a few expats to band together and hire a native English speaking tutor?

 

Lets say 4 families clubbed in to hire a tutor that worked with the kids 10 hours a week.

Pay that tutor 20,000 which would be a good salary.

That's just 5,000 each family per month.

 

Maybe you could find a retired teacher who would be keen to take on such a task.

 

As we are only talking about language here, a student age mix would not be such a problem.

Small country schools in Australian for instance often have several grades in the one classroom.

 

When I lived in Belgium in the early 70s, a few English wives successfully started an English school as a break away from the existing American school so it's not like it can't be done.

 

From my experience, kids learn a language very fast if put in the right environment.

I guarantee you, that if you took an 8 year old SEA kid to the west and plunked him down in a class, he would be chattering away in English within a month or two.

 

So, any thoughts?

 

KonGC

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Davaoeno
Pay that tutor 20,000 which would be a good salary.

 

I do believe that there is a Linc member presently advertising that he will work for 20,000 a month. [ just hide the reds and the greens tho ! lol ]

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Paul

If one (native English speaker) is living in the Philippines, and if this person has children he is rearing with a Filipina wife / g/f, I would suggest he simply spend a lot of time talking with the children. Kids, regardless where they come from, are baby tape recorders. They learn fast, and will certainly pick up English skills from the person in question. I mean, if he is retired, he probably has at least some time during the day to spend working with the kids.

 

Don't get me wrong here. I am not saying for him / them not to hire a tutor. I am merely stating that the children, if given enough attention, will speak English as fluently as the person teaching them. After all, learning Cebuano will be the easy part. They will forced to learn the national language in school.

 

Oh, my suggestion for the Philippine government would be, hire teachers (native English speakers) to teach English in the school system. I realize not a lot of foreigners would want to do this. But, some probably would. Now that I look back, I would have done that myself. I think the reward of affecting so many lives, in a positive manner, would make it worthwhile.

Edited by Paul
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Athena

In PI, learning English is also having a lot to do with the attitude of the people concerned.

 

Yes, as been pointed before English is learned at school but only in school environment and on Filipino accent. Its only when you go to Unis that have speech labs that you actually learn english properly as is supposed to be. But even that fall mostly in the wayside as that is only taught for 1x semester – roughly 6x months for an hour once a week. As we all know practice makes perfect. Sadly, what is learned at school is never applied in DTD life.

 

What I can suggest to those that have step filipino families is helped them or push them to learn English as it should be as my parents have done for us kids.

 

When we were young, as soon as we learn how to read, my father spend at least an hour every day to all of us kids, listening to us reading aloud from childrens book to start with, then gradually to adult books and newspapers.

 

There are 5x of us children and we have to sit in a line like we are in a classroom. He call us one by one to stand in front of him to read loudly a passage or a page or the whole chapter of a book while the rest of us children listen and he listen. He interrupts our reading from time to time to correct our reading or help us if we cannot read a word. He had done this for the whole of our primary years – and we don’t go to any private school but the local state school. When we were in grade 5/6, my father instead of just listing and correcting us from our reading, he started asking us what we understand from the passage and to tell him in our own words all in English and all while standing up in front of him and the rest of the sibling sitting down listening in apprehension for their turn. When we were young, it used to embarrass the hell of us but my god, did it worked???????? You bet!!!

 

It did use to embarrass the whole household and much giggling/sniggering behind my father’s back. I was embarrassed myself especially as he always singled me out to put more effort and seem to be always on my back to my mother’s amusement. But I have to admit that although I was very embarrassed, I also understand my father’s aim very well. His time and effort in helping me was very recognisable on my progress in school as far as English is concerned.

 

I can see how far behind I left my schoolmates that it inspired me to continue learning by myself. On my own I will read aloud from books every day and listen to English speaking radios and mimic their pronunciation. With my friends, I would also insist that we converse in english regardless if we are in or out of school. Not that I have any takers (lol) when there are other people around listening to us conversing. But if there’s noone around, they indulge my passion as they also themselves see the value of learning properly but just too shy to exercise their knowledge. But that is down to the rigid english teaching at school that emphasised on the grammar. As ive told my friends, grammar be hanged – unless you can converse fluidly in english how can grammar matters.

Edited by Athena
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afmayer
When we were young, as soon as we learn how to read, my father spend at least an hour every day to all of us kids, listening to us reading aloud from childrens book to start with, then gradually to adult books and newspapers.

 

Admirable techniques used by your Father... especially the comprehension part. I have noticed on many occasions that Filipinos will ridicule each other (pronunciation especially) when speaking English with Westerners present. The person being ridiculed will usually be too embarrassed to continue. Could being ridiculed (with subsequent embarrassment) cause the reticence to speak English in the first place?

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Athena

Admirable techniques used by your Father... especially the comprehension part. I have noticed on many occasions that Filipinos will ridicule each other (pronunciation especially) when speaking English with Westerners present. The person being ridiculed will usually be too embarrassed to continue. Could being ridiculed (with subsequent embarrassment) cause the reticence to speak English in the first place?

 

 

YES!!!

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Experienced

I'm sure that's a biggie.

 

I'm a little torn on the issue of even LEGITIMATE constructive criticism for non-native speakers... my wife speaks fluent English but with a wonderful accent (I think that Filipino-accented English with its pleasing rhythms and overtones of Spanish diction has a truly beautiful sound to it.. my theory as to why the call center industry has been so successful here) that I don't want to change in any way. I feel like I NEED to point out the common confusions (affecting many here) like pronoun genders, plurals, etc., in hopes that those may get straightened out because they directly affect comprehension. On the other hand I am very careful to NOT criticize or "correct" pronunciations (unless they're WAY off) or the many colorful figures of speech, such as: "I'll just be the one to..." or "you don't have to..." (meaning "you must not") or "just there"... etc., DESPITE my wife preferring that I do so... I tell her I love the "style" of her English speech and don't want her to change a thing as the aesthetics really can't be improved upon IMHO.

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KennyF

Guys, what I was suggesting was that as a group some of you moms and dads could organize a "mini English school".

Mini in that it would only have a few students, teach only English and be held for limited hours a week.

 

We're wandering off into the realm of what happened in the past and whether or not we understand the local folk.

 

Can we chew the fat on the "mini school" idea?

Or is everyone already happy with their kids English skills?

 

KonGC

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sandwindstars

"Native" English speakers can be misleading. Which native?

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David Spicer

Our daughter just turned 4 in January. For the first 2-3 years of her life she heard mostly only English; the exception being some of her surroundings, local TV, and her Lola. Her mother and practically all of her relatives spoke to her in English, and she watched American English cartoons on DVD.. She of course began speaking in English. By the time she was 3 she could understand a lot of Cebuano, but would always answer back in English. She is now 4 and if you talk to her in English she will answer in English. If you talk to her in Cebuano she will answer in Cebuano. Tagalog still has her perplexed, but she will pick it up from the TV. She speaks English about 90% of the time.

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David Spicer

I'm sure that's a biggie.

 

I'm a little torn on the issue of even LEGITIMATE constructive criticism for non-native speakers... my wife speaks fluent English but with a wonderful accent (I think that Filipino-accented English with its pleasing rhythms and overtones of Spanish diction has a truly beautiful sound to it.. my theory as to why the call center industry has been so successful here) that I don't want to change in any way. I feel like I NEED to point out the common confusions (affecting many here) like pronoun genders, plurals, etc., in hopes that those may get straightened out because they directly affect comprehension. On the other hand I am very careful to NOT criticize or "correct" pronunciations (unless they're WAY off) or the many colorful figures of speech, such as: "I'll just be the one to..." or "you don't have to..." (meaning "you must not") or "just there"... etc., DESPITE my wife preferring that I do so... I tell her I love the "style" of her English speech and don't want her to change a thing as the aesthetics really can't be improved upon IMHO.

 

I totally agree. I will correct our daughter but do not normally correct my wife because I love the way she speaks. Because of this I normally have to explain to our daughter that although her pronunciation is correct here in the Philippines, it is not the correct American English pronunciation.

 

I say American English because it's the only English that I know.

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afmayer

I'm sure that's a biggie.

 

I'm a little torn on the issue of even LEGITIMATE constructive criticism for non-native speakers... my wife speaks fluent English but with a wonderful accent (I think that Filipino-accented English with its pleasing rhythms and overtones of Spanish diction has a truly beautiful sound to it.. my theory as to why the call center industry has been so successful here) that I don't want to change in any way. I feel like I NEED to point out the common confusions (affecting many here) like pronoun genders, plurals, etc., in hopes that those may get straightened out because they directly affect comprehension. On the other hand I am very careful to NOT criticize or "correct" pronunciations (unless they're WAY off) or the many colorful figures of speech, such as: "I'll just be the one to..." or "you don't have to..." (meaning "you must not") or "just there"... etc., DESPITE my wife preferring that I do so... I tell her I love the "style" of her English speech and don't want her to change a thing as the aesthetics really can't be improved upon IMHO.

 

I also have learned to understand and appreciate my wife's English. However, we will be going to the states very soon and she needs (with my help) to work on pronunciation, tenses, gender, etc. Even though her English is very understandable to me and other Westerners in the Philippines, she will not have that same luxury in the states. I believe I made a mistake in not correcting her English in the past, as her mistakes have now been positively reinforced.

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Davaoeno
I say American English because it's the only English that I know.

 

we all have our crosses to bear !! :)

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Davaoeno
Can we chew the fat on the "mini school" idea?

 

I was actually serious about David considering something like that. He needs the income, he is obviously bright and he has an excellent command of English . [ the comment about his colours was just a joke ]

 

It might be a good fit for someone like him

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KennyF

Well let's see if some of the mums and dads pick it up.

I think if I was in the position some members find themselves in, I would be trying to put together my own school.

KonGG

Edited by KennyF

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