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USMC-Retired

In search for the end of the Internet I found this little gem tucked away. Kinda of an interesting read for a history buff.

 

It is a timeline for the history of computers. Just one example of some wild things to read.

 

http://www.computerhistory.org/timeline/?year=1980

 

1980_ibm3380.jpg

 

Hard disks are an essential part of the computer revolution, allowing fast, random access to large amounts of data. IBM announced its most successful mainframe hard disk (what IBM called a “Direct Access Storage Device (DASD)” in June of 1980, actually shipping units the following year. The 3380 came in six models initially (later growing to many more) and price at time of introduction ranged from $81,000 to $142,200. The base model stored 2.5 GB of data, later models extended this to 20GB. IBM sold over 100,000 3380s, generating tens of billions of dollars in revenue making the 3380 one of IBM’s most successful products of all time.

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Topper

I remember those machines well. I ran power for them at a data storage facility. They took up a lot of floor space and consumed a lot of power. Later, when we hooked up power for newer units, they took up about one third of the space, used one half the power and held a hundred times more information. During the course of the next ten years or so, every time they replaced an old model with a newer one, it took up less and less physical space, so much so that it almost looked like they were moving out of the building. The last time I was there was around 2002 and I wonder what it must look like now. Probably only a few machines that do it all.

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Experienced

Fantastic museum... if you ever find yourself in Mountain View, CA and you have an interest in technology, it's guaranteed to be an afternoon well-spent.

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Alan S

That was about the time I got my first "PC", (a Sharp MZ-80b)

 

I had worked in digital equipment before then, and seen LEO, but to actually have a computer of your own was something different.

Not that there was much you could do with it in the early days!

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broden

what's fun is looking in some old computer magazines at the old ads

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philuk

zx spektrum 48k, what a machine

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SkyMan

I wonder why it only goes back to '39?

 

An interesting note on the word 'computer.' You can narrow down the date of an old dictionary as pre WWII if it defines computer as 'one who computes' while post WWII if it defines computer as a machine.

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Experienced

What was old is new again:

 

 

I might be interested in an xToaster!

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USMC-Retired
toaster_pc_2.jpg
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