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Can you write a program Visual Studio


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USMC-Retired

Years ago when I wrote my first program in DB1 and Paradox it was difficult. You had to create everything and design everything. You had write the size of the boxes and the color of boxes using 1,0 coding. This was not for the shy of heart and I figured I put that on the shelf and never look back. If you want a copy I can send it to you. Its on eight 3 1/5 floppies.

 

Today I decided I wanted something for people to watch TV. I hired people to write code and then they sent it back. Well over time of doing that I eventually ran out of funds. The program was written in Visual Studio and I decided I would look at the code and see what I can accomplish without continually paying people.

 

I have never been school trained to write code or learned formally how to do this. Yet Visual Studio makes life easier and if you can think logically going straight forward it is an easy programing language to understand. Commands are simple to use and straight forward. The buttons frames windows and browsers are all there for you to use. You can lay the program out as you want. Then once you have done that it is a matter of assigning action to these items. That is where programing comes into play. I kinda of looked at it like fixing a car. If I turned the ignition certain things must happen prior to the car starting. Like my car I no longer need to build a carburetor or battery or wires. First years of programing you had to build everything. Now you just need the parts and assemble it.

 

Private Sub Label1_Click(ByVal sender As System.Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles Label1.Click

MessageBox.Show("Select the Media you wish to remove")

End Sub

 

If you look at the above. The first line is red is given to you. Simple.

 

What did I want. I wanted a message box. Ok that was simple

 

Of course I want you to see it so I must show it to you.

 

Then of course I need a message to you.

 

Simple. Now if you click label1 you get a message box with what I want. The program has the OK button already programed for you. So it closes.

 

An example of the TV program has 9800 lines of code that were hand written to handle everything that it does. Then another 48,000 lines of code that it generated on its own. I was shocked at how simple it actually was. Compared to my days of DB1.1 and Paradox. The built in debugger with visual studio prevents the locked computer in a loop cycle. Which happen so many times years ago.

 

These types of things are getting simpler for everyone to create websites and create little things to do tasks you always do. Well enjoy....

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afmayer
Yet Visual Studio makes life easier and if you can think logically going straight forward it is an easy programing language to understand.

 

Visual Studio is not a programming language... it is a development environment that supports multiple languages (C++, F#, etc). Yes, the old days of programming in an editor (like vi) are disappearing (except in some UNIX/Linux environments). You really date yourself with mentioning Paradox... LOL...

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KennyF

I have made my living since 1998 with Foxpro DOS.

Still do.

 

KonGC

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USMC-Retired
Visual Studio is not a programming language...

 

That is why I assume it so dependent on netframe work.

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afmayer

I have made my living since 1998 with Foxpro DOS.

Still do.

 

KonGC

 

Yeah... Foxpro was big many years ago. I guess you still find a lot of legacy work to keep you busy?

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KennyF

Yeah... Foxpro was big many years ago. I guess you still find a lot of legacy work to keep you busy?

 

Just my own program.

Foxpro was and still is a fantastic way to handle relation data bases.

On todays machines it's like greased lightning.

And it's as easy to program as the old MS basic.

Add to that the fact that it can take advantage of SQL.

 

KonGC

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MattFromGA

I've been programming with Visual Studio since its creation, used Visual C++ before that, and plain MS C++ before that.

 

I would strongly suggest moving towards C# over the visual basic you posted. C# has a future, VB is for old corporate developers who dont want to move forward. I would never recommend VB for new apps.

 

That being said, VB.net is a first class programming language and has no real limits to getting it done. From a developer "pride" perspective, if I did do VB.net, I wouldnt admit it in front of other developers unless they were also VB devs.

 

If you have an eye for the future, you might think about getting the VS 11 beta which has support for JavaScript based apps. While .NET always support JavaScript, its only now that VS really supports that option well and it brings JavaScript to near first class dev language. However, the JavaScript projects that come with VS11 are geared towards Windows 8 metro. The up side to that is you can get your apps in the Windows App Store, which is growing every week even though Windows 8 is just beta.

 

Again, C# is the best choice for a developer with Norseman's background.

Edited by MattFromGA
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USMC-Retired

C seems like the best of all worlds. Though I have been using VS and VB net examples. To wade through logical expressions. Seems like the easy way to deep end. Though I am finding some limitations with call to type commands or extensive over the top fatting.

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Maybe Next Yr

Although my main job is analysis and design for the new young hotshots to program, recently I had a short job on a legacy system and wrote some COBOL and also some TAL (proprietary language for Tandem Non-Stop computers) ... I really enjoyed getting back into the old code! :)

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MattFromGA

C is fine for specific types of work, typically embedded systems (like micro controllers, chips for truck monitoring, etc.). However, C is not object oriented and doesnt offer memory management out of the box. It is easy to build programs that crash and leak memory in C.

 

C# is a "C based programming language", just like Java, C++ and many other languages. The nice thing about C# is that it can be used in Linux, Macs and other environments via the mono platform. Many Linux variations include mono as part of the distribution. It is possible to run ASP.NET web sites on Apache web server running in Linux.

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Cipro

C, C++, BCPL, C# and many others are all derived from ALGOL (get off my lawn, etc) and C# is the way to go IMO if you want to develop casually for .NET.

 

Yes, I use VS to pay the bills.

Edited by Cipro
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Maybe Next Yr
C, C++, BCPL, C# and many others are all derived from ALGOL

 

That's true only in the sense of the 1st "block structured" language. But I think that today's languages have taken things much further (i.e. Objects vs. blocks) and have borrowed from other interesting starts like LISP.

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USMC-Retired

What strikes me is that for 60 years plus Lisp Fortran have stood the test time. They seem like the foundations that others built around. Though not mainstream GUI the essentials they provide in computation and calculation world is unbelievable.

 

One thing about programing though. As my analogy earlier states. If you understand the logic and how things move. Then it is a matter of understanding the parts to make that happen.

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Cipro
Then it is a matter of understanding the parts to make that happen.

 

Understanding how to analyze algorithmic complexity is one of several things that seperates the men form the boy sin software development, stringing some API calls together is not a big deal.

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USMC-Retired

Understanding how to analyze algorithmic complexity is one of several things that seperates the men form the boy sin software development, stringing some API calls together is not a big deal.

 

Is that not true with everything. Between the worker and the owner.

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