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Self Drilling Screws


David_LivinginTalisay

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David_LivinginTalisay

I am sure many know what a 'Self Drilling Screw' is?

 

Basically the end of the screw has a drilling/cutting tip, as a pilot hole for the Self Tapping Srew Thread, so one can attach to steel, without having to drill holes.

 

Drywall-screw.jpg

 

I boughts some from Gaisano Fiesta Mall described as 'gypsum scrw for stl 6x38', Php74.75

These looked like the image above.

 

Drywall-screw.jpg

More image detail of similar, but shorter length version.

 

What i liked about these Self Drilling Steel Screws was the following:-

  • Good Value for money (100 screws so 75 Centavo each)
  • Hard and Sharp - does a good job of cutting a Pilot Hole in steel, with Battery Drill.
  • Stronger and cheaper than a carbon steel drill bit for same pilot hole size.
  • Hight tensile strength (but can be snapped, if bent)
  • Snapped off end, works as a pilot hole drill bit.

I am finding more and more uses for such Self Drilling Screws.

 

For example on my XT225 Main Stand, one needs a tool to tighten some large Hex Socket Head Screws (Allen Key 1/2" AF), but no room for standard Allen Key as the XT225 Frame etc gets in the way. What was 'supplied' was a short bolt with 1/2" AF Hex head with a nut wound down to the shoulder, the bolt cut off flush wth the nut face and welded on.

 

Trouble was, when I used this 'Tool' with a 1/2" AT Ring spanner, to remove the Main Stand, the weld on the nut/bolt gave way and the nut was unscrewing! It failed to undoe the 2 x large Hex Socket Head Bolts, holding the main Stand into the rear engine mounts, with its tapered end. I was going to effected a repair by drilling 2 x pilot holes, diametrically opposite so there were shallow holes, half in the nut and half in the bolt, so new welds should be stronger.

 

I did not have access to a welder/machine readily available, so I tried and alternative method, to secure the nut to the bolt.

 

This being to drill through the tightened nut, from one face, to the opposite face, with the Self Drilling Screw. I did this from opposite sides, and the screw found the hole in the center of the bolt and tapped its way through, until it protruded from the hole drilled in the opposite face. I simply snapped off the screw head, and the self drilling point, and ground the screw flush with the nut faces.

 

Happy to report I was able to remove the 2 x big (1/2" A/F Allan) Tapered end bolts, with this repaired removal 'Tool' thanks to the amazing drilling capabilty, and high tensile strength, of these Self Drilling Screws.

 

Another Job I used them for was to screw together 1.5" Angle Bar Frame that I was constructiong to hold up a molded vanity sink top in our Bathroom. I was getting it welded, but wanted to have all the pieces held in the right places, and square and true. It welded together good and accurate with one exception. I had added 2 short brackets at the front, to attach the curved facia. One of these was a bit askew as I only used a single mounting hole and it must have got lossened and knoocked out of square before it got welded. Next time I will use 2 x mounting holes diagonally apart. In this case it did not matter, as hidden by the front facia so the one bracket attaching it can't be seen, that it is slanted off the vertical slightly.

 

I used countersunk screws (as some faces were to be flush against the wall, so no protruding screw heads), but this meant not enough scew thead to stronly secure. I guess I could have added extra thickness of steel for 2 x diagonally opposed screws to cut into. I also think if I had bought some Flat or Pan Head screws as well as Countersunk, and shorter, the job could have been done with screws alone and no welding perhaps?

 

Self-Drilling-Screw-DIN7504-.jpg

 

din7504k-hex-washer-head-self-drilling-screws.jpg

 

But that molded sink top was pretty heavy and I wanted it held up by the walls and not relient on the MDF carcase (that I was replacing and rebuildin, as it got wet when the shower stopped when water got cut off and was not turned off, so when water restored when we were out, the shower came back on with shower doors open and squirted into the drawers. MDF turns into cardbourd when wet - best avoid this type of construction. Marine Ply or Comb Jointed, Engineered Wood is much better (and cheaper than solid wood)

 

Concrete-Screw.jpg

 

Never seen these 'Concrete' Screws' before!

 

If they work, sure beats drilling holes with masonary bit and using 'plugs'!

 

China_Hex_head_Self_taping_screws201010216273110.jpg

 

Anyone know if any Hardware Shop in Cebu stocks such 'Concrete Screws'?

 

I also ideally want some hex head Self Tappers, as one bracket mounting hole is blocked by the cross-brace frame bracket.

 

Using a ratchet socket spanner, would have been easier than drilling an access hole for a crosspoint screwdriver, and finding my screwdriver is not long enough.

 

 

401480473_542.jpg

Concrete Screws - Hex Head

 

 

400px-Screw_head_types.svg.png

 

(a) pan, (:yahoo: dome(button), © round, (d) truss(mushroom), (e) flat (countersunk), (f) oval(raisedhead)

 

 

 

ISO metric screw thread

 

Main article: ISO metric screw thread

 

The basic principles of the ISO metric screw thread are defined in international standard ISO 68-1 and preferred combinations of diameter and pitch are listed in ISO 261. The smaller subset of diameter and pitch combinations commonly used in screws, nuts and bolts is given in ISO 262. The most commonly used pitch value for each diameter is the coarse pitch. For some diameters, one or two additional fine pitch variants are also specified, for special applications such as threads in thin-walled pipes. ISO metric screw threads are designated by the letter M followed by the major diameter of the thread in millimeters (e.g., M8). If the thread does not use the normal coarse pitch (e.g., 1.25 mm in the case of M8), then the pitch in millimeters is also appended with a multiplication sign (e.g. "M8×1" if the screw thread has an outer diameter of 8 mm and advances by 1 mm per 360° rotation).

 

The nominal diameter of a metric screw is the outer diameter of the thread. The tapped hole (or nut) into which the screw fits, has an internal diameter which is the size of the screw minus the pitch of the thread. Thus, an M6 screw, which has a pitch of 1 mm, is made by threading a 6 mm shank, and the nut or threaded hole is made by tapping threads into a hole of 5 mm diameter (6 mm - 1 mm).

 

Metric hexagon bolts, screws and nuts are specified, for example, in British Standard BS 4190 (general purpose screws) and BS 3692 (precision screws). The following table lists the relationship given in these standards between the thread size and the maximal width across the hexagonal flats (wrench size):

ISO metric thread M1.6 M2 M2.5 M3 M4 M5 M6 M8 M10 M12 M16 M20 M24 M30 M36 M42 M48 M56 M64 Wrench size (mm) 3.2 4.0 5.0 5.5 7.0 8.0 10.0 13.0 17.0 19.0 24.0 30.0 36.0 46.0 55.0 65.0 75.0 85.0 95.0

 

 

In addition, the following non-preferred intermediate sizes are specified: ISO metric thread M7 M14 M18 M22 M27 M33 M39 M45 M52 M60 M68 Wrench size (mm) 11 22 27 32 41 50 60 70 80 90 100

Edited by David_LivinginTalisay
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Alfred E. Neuman

This will be the answer to my bench press repair.

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Headshot

In the US, we call them "self-tapping" screws. They are great if you are working with lightweight steel framing.

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KennyF

In the US, we call them "self-tapping" screws. They are great if you are working with lightweight steel framing.

 

I might have it wrong but I think David's talking about self drilling or self start screws rather than self tapping screws.

post-4822-0-49262100-1330919473_thumb.jpg.

 

Self tapping on left, self start/self drilling on right.

 

KonGC

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Headshot

I might have it wrong but I think David's talking about self drilling or self start screws rather than self tapping screws.

post-4822-0-49262100-1330919473_thumb.jpg.

 

Self tapping on left, self start/self drilling on right.

 

KonGC

 

I get the impression that you Commonwealth guys have diiferent names for things than we do in the US. To us, any screw that creates (taps) it's own hole through metal is self-tapping. The difference between the screws on the right and left is the thickness of metal they are designed to tap. Those with hardened threads all the way to the end are for thin metal, whereas those with the built-in drill point are for thicker metal. Other than that, the purpose is the same.

Edited by Headshot
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KennyF
To us, any screw that creates (taps) it's own hole through metal is self-tapping.

 

In Oz, a self tapping screw is just that, a screw that taps its own thread, usually in a pre existing hole.

 

From Wiki "A tap cuts a thread on the inside surface of a hole, creating a female surface which functions like a nut"

 

A self drilling screw does the same but drills its own hole.

Sort of a drill and self tapper combined.

 

KonGC

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Self tapping screw often needs a pre-drilled hole. Particularly when fastening hard (and thicker) materials, where if a hole is not pre-drilled the torque required to turn the screw can exceed it's strength and the head snaps off. The self DRILLING screw has a drill bit shaped portion at it's cutting end, thereby eliminating the need for a pre-drilled hole.

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Headshot

Well...if Wiki says so...it must be so. I'll still continue to call them self-tapping screws even though I can see from the literature they are also called self-drilling screws. It really doesn't matter what they're called...they're great little contraptions and save a lot of work.

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David_LivinginTalisay

Well...if Wiki says so...it must be so. I'll still continue to call them self-tapping screws even though I can see from the literature they are also called self-drilling screws. It really doesn't matter what they're called...they're great little contraptions and save a lot of work.

 

What sort of Material and Gauge/Thickness have you managed to get a 'Self Tapper' to cut/punch its own way through cutting a thread at the same time?

 

Unless you are talking thin aluminium or even thinner galvanised steel, and used a hammer to bang the point of such Self-Tapper into such material, think you will find you need a Pilot Hole.

 

I did a 4 Year Engineering Apprenticeship with the MOD in the UK, so I do know something about tools, material, pilot holes, cutting speeds and depth in different materials.

 

Unless it was very thin material, and I could 'punch' a hole, I would always drill a 'pilot hole' first (using one of my snapped off 'Self Drilling Screws', as they are stronger, more capable, and a damn site cheaper @ 75 Centavo, than any small diameter carbon steel drill bit, or HSS twist drill, 3mm Dia.).

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I am sure many know what a 'Self Drilling Screw' is?

 

Basically the end of the screw has a drilling/cutting tip, as a pilot hole for the Self Tapping Srew Thread, so one can attach to steel, without having to drill holes.

 

Drywall-screw.jpg

 

I boughts some from Gaisano Fiesta Mall described as 'gypsum scrw for stl 6x38', Php74.75

These looked like the image above.

 

Drywall-screw.jpg

More image detail of similar, but shorter length version.

 

What i liked about these Self Drilling Steel Screws was the following:-

  • Good Value for money (100 screws so 75 Centavo each)
  • Hard and Sharp - does a good job of cutting a Pilot Hole in steel, with Battery Drill.
  • Stronger and cheaper than a carbon steel drill bit for same pilot hole size.
  • Hight tensile strength (but can be snapped, if bent)
  • Snapped off end, works as a pilot hole drill bit.

I am finding more and more uses for such Self Drilling Screws.

 

For example on my XT225 Main Stand, one needs a tool to tighten some large Hex Socket Head Screws (Allen Key 1/2" AF), but no room for standard Allen Key as the XT225 Frame etc gets in the way. What was 'supplied' was a short bolt with 1/2" AF Hex head with a nut wound down to the shoulder, the bolt cut off flush wth the nut face and welded on.

 

Trouble was, when I used this 'Tool' with a 1/2" AT Ring spanner, to remove the Main Stand, the weld on the nut/bolt gave way and the nut was unscrewing! It failed to undoe the 2 x large Hex Socket Head Bolts, holding the main Stand into the rear engine mounts, with its tapered end. I was going to effected a repair by drilling 2 x pilot holes, diametrically opposite so there were shallow holes, half in the nut and half in the bolt, so new welds should be stronger.

 

I did not have access to a welder/machine readily available, so I tried and alternative method, to secure the nut to the bolt.

 

This being to drill through the tightened nut, from one face, to the opposite face, with the Self Drilling Screw. I did this from opposite sides, and the screw found the hole in the center of the bolt and tapped its way through, until it protruded from the hole drilled in the opposite face. I simply snapped off the screw head, and the self drilling point, and ground the screw flush with the nut faces.

 

Happy to report I was able to remove the 2 x big (1/2" A/F Allan) Tapered end bolts, with this repaired removal 'Tool' thanks to the amazing drilling capabilty, and high tensile strength, of these Self Drilling Screws.

 

Another Job I used them for was to screw together 1.5" Angle Bar Frame that I was constructiong to hold up a molded vanity sink top in our Bathroom. I was getting it welded, but wanted to have all the pieces held in the right places, and square and true. It welded together good and accurate with one exception. I had added 2 short brackets at the front, to attach the curved facia. One of these was a bit askew as I only used a single mounting hole and it must have got lossened and knoocked out of square before it got welded. Next time I will use 2 x mounting holes diagonally apart. In this case it did not matter, as hidden by the front facia so the one bracket attaching it can't be seen, that it is slanted off the vertical slightly.

 

I used countersunk screws (as some faces were to be flush against the wall, so no protruding screw heads), but this meant not enough scew thead to stronly secure. I guess I could have added extra thickness of steel for 2 x diagonally opposed screws to cut into. I also think if I had bought some Flat or Pan Head screws as well as Countersunk, and shorter, the job could have been done with screws alone and no welding perhaps?

 

Self-Drilling-Screw-DIN7504-.jpg

 

din7504k-hex-washer-head-self-drilling-screws.jpg

 

But that molded sink top was pretty heavy and I wanted it held up by the walls and not relient on the MDF carcase (that I was replacing and rebuildin, as it got wet when the shower stopped when water got cut off and was not turned off, so when water restored when we were out, the shower came back on with shower doors open and squirted into the drawers. MDF turns into cardbourd when wet - best avoid this type of construction. Marine Ply or Comb Jointed, Engineered Wood is much better (and cheaper than solid wood)

 

Concrete-Screw.jpg

 

Never seen these 'Concrete' Screws' before!

 

If they work, sure beats drilling holes with masonary bit and using 'plugs'!

 

China_Hex_head_Self_taping_screws201010216273110.jpg

 

Anyone know if any Hardware Shop in Cebu stocks such 'Concrete Screws'?

 

I also ideally want some hex head Self Tappers, as one bracket mounting hole is blocked by the cross-brace frame bracket.

 

Using a ratchet socket spanner, would have been easier than drilling an access hole for a crosspoint screwdriver, and finding my screwdriver is not long enough.

 

 

401480473_542.jpg

Concrete Screws - Hex Head

 

 

400px-Screw_head_types.svg.png

 

(a) pan, ( :welcome: dome(button), © round, (d) truss(mushroom), (e) flat (countersunk), (f) oval(raisedhead)

 

Was there a question in there somewhere? I believe you are a master screwer or just have a bit to much time on your hands. But it just so happens right now I do as well. So here is what I have to say about screwing.

 

Your first pic is self tapping screws for light gauge metal applications, fine threads indicate this. Heavier gauge projects will need a pilot hole drilled to keep from snapping the heads off that particular screw. They can be bought here at most good hardware stores in small packages, bulk buys can be found at specialty screw, bolt and fastener store that caters to contractors.

 

Your second pic is a drywall or Sheetrock (gypsum board) screw, note the coarse threads, indicating wood fastening application. No pilot hole needed. An excellent screw choice for many home (wood) projects. Finding them here......good luck. They will try to sell you the fine thread but it is not good for Sheetrock and wood projects. I brought 50 pounds of them with me for my Sheetrock. I have a friend bring me 2 one pound boxes in different lengths each year from the states just for wood projects.

 

Your 3rd pic, from approx. 9 o'clock position to the 6 o'clock position are self tapping zinc screws for light metal fastening applications where moisture is not a treat. From 6 to 9 are common zinc screws for very light metal application. Sometimes a pilot hole is required if you value your fingers.

 

Your 4th pic is of common zinc self tapping lag bolt. Fine thread for metal, coarse for wood. Not recommended for areas where water may be a problem. Stainless is better suited to moisture exposure.

 

Your 5th pic is of an inferior concrete screw. If made in China and sold here......stay away from. To soft to do the job. There is a blue one that is case hardened and will hold very well. No anchor needed, but you still need to drill a pilot hole. They come with the proper bit included in the package.

 

Your 6th pic is of a common galvanized lag bolt, good for outdoor applications. I still recommend a small pilot hole to keep from binding and or spitting you project. If no pilot is used you can coat with soap (bar) and this will help.

 

Your 7th is a common self tapping hex head lag bolt, chrome or zinc.

 

Your abcdef pics are common everyday zinc screws commonly used with a washer (lock if needed) and nut.

 

These can be found at places I mention above with the exception of the actual Sheetrock screw and the blue concrete screw, those i got from the states.

 

Well I got to go lay down now, thats a lot of screwing for an old man! I did a lifetime apprenticeship in the screwing department. Have a good day.

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Bill H

For boat building, we prefer our screws to be stainless so they don't rust. Those drywall and self drilling screws can rust. We also tend to use silicon bronze ring shank nails in lieu of screws in places where you would never want to remove the fastener. In all cases, we really like the square drive. Far superior to Phillips head but not so easy to find here in the Philippines.

 

Bill

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Headshot

What sort of Material and Gauge/Thickness have you managed to get a 'Self Tapper' to cut/punch its own way through cutting a thread at the same time?

 

Unless you are talking thin aluminium or even thinner galvanised steel, and used a hammer to bang the point of such Self-Tapper into such material, think you will find you need a Pilot Hole.

 

I did a 4 Year Engineering Apprenticeship with the MOD in the UK, so I do know something about tools, material, pilot holes, cutting speeds and depth in different materials.

 

Unless it was very thin material, and I could 'punch' a hole, I would always drill a 'pilot hole' first (using one of my snapped off 'Self Drilling Screws', as they are stronger, more capable, and a damn site cheaper @ 75 Centavo, than any small diameter carbon steel drill bit, or HSS twist drill, 3mm Dia.).

 

I built an entire steel building (60' long x 40' wide x 25' high) for my barn back in the US using what you call self-drilling screws and I call self-tapping screws (those with the little drill-tip on the screw). We never once pre-drilled a hole. The frame was basically 2" steel u-channel and the skin was 10-guage pre-painted steel sheet. The building has withstood some direct hits from thunderstorm microbursts with wind gusts over 100 mph (that broke trees).

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David_LivinginTalisay
I might have it wrong but I think David's talking about self drilling or self start screws rather than self tapping screws. post-4822-0-49262100-1330919473_thumb.jpg. Self tapping on left, self start/self drilling on right. KonGC

 

index-1.jpg

 

You got it right 'Kenny F', as per the Subject Title 'Self Drilling Screws' is what I am talking about in this Thread, like those Screws to the RIGHT of the image you attached, and they are different to 'Self Tapping' Screws, as shown to the LEFT.

 

It should be obvious from the 2 x fluted cutting edges on the parallel section, after the conical point, followed by the threaded cutting edges on a paralled 'shank', that it is rather different Screw from a 'Self Tapping' Screw, with NO Cutting flutes, and a tapered shank, that forms the thread from progressive force, rather than any 'cutting' action.

 

I had seen Hex Head Washer Roofing Bolts, with self cutting tip, but tended to be on the LARGE size.

 

I also know BS Simbajon Construction Co., used Self Cutting Countersunk Screws to attach the 'HardiFlex' board used for the Ceiling, to galvanised framing. These were smaller screws, but that galvanised steel framing they used was not very heavy gauge.

 

I was rather amazed how well these Self Drilling Screws cut through quite hard steel, and how well they drilled in deep steel (ie12mm A/F of that Nut - but I did 6mm from each side, as I was not sure if it would manage all the way through)!

 

I will use these snapped off lengths from joining 2 x Angle Bar (3/16" thick), for drilling Pilot holes in Steel from now on. What does it matter if they only manage 4 or 5 holes when I used the Screw to join whatever, and then used the snapped off section, for just 75 Centavo.

 

Why buy shorter screws, and use them only once?

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David_LivinginTalisay

For boat building, we prefer our screws to be stainless so they don't rust. Those drywall and self drilling screws can rust. We also tend to use silicon bronze ring shank nails in lieu of screws in places where you would never want to remove the fastener. In all cases, we really like the square drive. Far superior to Phillips head but not so easy to find here in the Philippines.

 

Bill

 

Bill,

 

I have seen pictures with the square drive heads, and in fact would not mind buying a couple, but not to really drill holes, with the Square Drive!

 

201132991150319s.jpg

 

I want to drill/drive the screw into a wooden dowel or aluminium bar.

 

3332593038_2ccd10cfc4.jpg

 

This then becomes a 'Tool' with the dowel or aluminium bar for ming the 'handle' and the square drive fitting over the Tappet Adjustment screw

Might need to bend the screw, fairly close to the head, so it over at 60 Degrees or so, so one does not need to remove the fuel tank, to gain clearance for using it directly above the Tappet Adjustment Scew 3mm Square End.

 

Other Types of heads, having Square Drive:-

 

 

Square_Drive_Wafer_Head_Self_Drilling_Screw.jpg

 

Square Drive Wafer Head Self Drilling Screw

 

 

Specifications

Material: Low Carbon Steel from C1008 To C1022

Diameter: #4 to 5/16 (M3,9 to M8) Descriptions Material: Low Carbon Steel from C1008 To C1022 Diameter: #4 to 5/16 (M3,9 to M8) Length: 3/8" to 4" (10mm to 102mm) Type: BSD (Spaced thread) and CSD (Machine screw thread) Finish: Plain/Lubrication, Galvanized (Zinc, Yellow Zinc Plated), Hot Dip Galvanized, Chrome Plated, Nickel Plated, Brass Plated, Ceramic Coating, Anti-corrosion Nano Coating, Customized Color

 

 

 

Such Square Head Drive Screws are available in Stainless Steel

 

 

2011112921144118151s.jpg

 

Stainless Steel Flat Square Head Self Drilling Screw

 

Model / Specifications:FI-220105

Stainless Steel Flat Square Recess Self Drilling Screw Material:SS304,SS316,SS410 Head type:Flat Head Sizes:3.5mm,4.2mm,4.8mm,5.5mm,6.3mm,customized are also welcomed Packing:small box packing

Related Searches:stainless steel flat head self tapping screw | washer head stainless steel self drilling screws | stainless steel wafer head self drilling screws | stainless steel pan head self drilling screw

 

 

 

Robertson

40px-Screw_Head_-_Robertson.svg.png

100px-Robertson_screw.jpgmagnify-clip.png

Close-up of a Robertson screw

 

 

A Robertson, also known as a square,[15] screw drive has a square-shaped socket in the screw head and a square protrusion on the tool. Both the tool and the socket have a taper to make inserting the tool easier. Robertson screws are used mainly in Canada (where they are very common), though they can be found elsewhere.[16] Robertson screwdrivers are easy to use one-handed, because the tapered socket retains the screw, even if it is shaken. They also allow for the use of angled screw drivers and trim head screws. The socket-headed Robertson screws are self-centering, reduce cam out, stop a power tool when set, and can be removed if painted-over or old and rusty. In industry, they speed up production and reduce product damage.[17]

Canadian P.L. Robertson invented the Robertson screw and screwdriver in 1908 and received a patent in 1909. An earlier square drive wood screw patent, U.S. Patent 161,390, was issued to Allan Cummings on March 30, 1875.

Robertson had licensed the screw in England, but the party that he was dealing with intentionally drove the company into bankruptcy and purchased the rights from the trustee, thus circumventing Robertson.[citation needed] He spent a small fortune buying back the rights. Subsequently, he refused to allow anyone to make the screws under license. When Henry Ford tried out the Robertson screws he found they saved considerable time in Model T production, but when Robertson refused to license the screws to Ford, Ford realized that the supply of screws would not be guaranteed and chose to limit their use in production to Ford's Canadian division.[18][19][20] Robertson's refusal to license his screws prevented their widespread adoption in the United States, where the more widely licensed Phillips head has gained acceptance. The restriction of licensing of Robertson's internal-wrenching square may have sped the development of the internal-wrenching hexagon, although documentation of this is limited.

Robertson-head screwdrivers are available in range of tip-sizes. A given driver's suitability for use with a particular size of screw and recess size is indicated upon its handle according to the following color code:

Recess dimensions[21][22]ColourScrew typesFractionRangeOrange (#00)No. 1 & 21/16 in.+1.77–1.80 mm (0.070–0.071 in)Yellow (#0)No. 3 & 43/32 in.-2.29–2.31 mm (0.090–0.091 in)Green (#1)No. 5, 6 & 77/64 in.+2.82–2.86 mm (0.111–0.113 in)Red (#2)No. 8, 9 & 101/8 in.+3.34–3.38 mm (0.131–0.133 in)Black (#3)No. 12 and larger3/16 in.+4.81–4.85 mm (0.189–0.191 in)

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KennyF
We never once pre-drilled a hole.

 

Yes you did. Every screw pre drilled its own hole.

 

KonGC

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