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newbie linux questions


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I have a new desktop (since last November) -came with starter 7. The damn thing hangs/freezes every day, which my xp laptop never, ever does. So I want to try Ubuntu, or Puppy, or whatever. A few questions: Will skype run the same as before? What will happen to my OpenOffice files -will they be in Libre? all my files, for that matter -what happens to them?

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I use Ubuntu 10.4 on a couple of older computers. Can't beat the price -- free. Ubuntu is easy to use. My computers fire up and shut down in a few seconds now,. Software you mention will run the same, just download linux versions. Lots of add-ons from their software database accessible from the operating system. There may be a few odd programs you use that won't, and maybe problem occasionally with unavailable driver here or there, but hasn't been a critical issue for me. Can't remember how I handled the file transfer. Someone here will know. Definitely back them all up first. Once up and running Linux has a free on-line backup site, Ubuntu One I think it's called..

Edited by DrSmith
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USMC-Retired

You can install a dual boot that way you have both Windows and Linux. Thus you never lose your files.

 

You can back them up and do a fresh install and format.

 

Skype and open office both work seamless on linux. Skype will actually work better.

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Nice to hear, guys. Thanks. I will do the dual first, then switch over -seems to be the best way to go. What happens on start up -will I be asked which OS I want to use?

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USMC-Retired

you get a boot menu. You can install right from windows the Ubuntu Linux distro.

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i have the latest Ubuntu 11.10, i set it to do dual boot so i can choose what OS i will used since i do programming stuff. Openoffice and Skype will run perfectly with Ubuntu, and you can also use a virtual machine to run Windows Apps in a Linux Platform, its called Wine. Most softwares nowadays are multi platforms, means they can be installed in a PC, LINUX or a MAC. Also you need a Higher specs of hardware so your OS wont hang up, better install some graphics card on it to have a better performance, especially LINUX and a Higher RAM 2GB is good but 4gb of RAM is great.

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CardiacKid

I have a new desktop (since last November) -came with starter 7. The damn thing hangs/freezes every day, which my xp laptop never, ever does. So I want to try Ubuntu, or Puppy, or whatever. A few questions: Will skype run the same as before? What will happen to my OpenOffice files -will they be in Libre? all my files, for that matter -what happens to them?

Another distro that you might want to look at for your laptop is Mint Linux. Some describe it as Ubuntu done right. It is an excellent distro for Linux newbies. System requirements for Linux are typically a lot less than Windows and you usually will notice a marked increase in speed. http://distrowatch.com/ :rofl: will provide you with reviews and screenshots of many distros. Mint has a downloadable user guide that covers the installation step by step and can answer many of your questions. Mint uses the Ubuntu repositories so anything you can get for Ubuntu is also available for Mint.
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Personally i give a huge vote for Ubuntu 11.10. Mint is great if you like menu's but i just reformatted my 80 year old Dad's laptop from Windoze to Ubuntu and he loves it. He is a total technophobe and he keeps telling me that "this one just works right, how come my old system didn't do all this". Of course his Windows system had everything on it, he just couldn't find it. Now with Ubuntu, it seems like its a lot clearer to him how things work and fit together.

 

BTW, he did all the Ubuntu install and setup himself (with a couple of phone calls to me), so if he can do it...

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  • 3 weeks later...

Well he did something right that I am not doing, lol. It sounds so simple -follow the ubuntu download instructions. I have tried this so many times now, putting it in a flashdrive and dvd but it never boots. I always get the same message: "Do you want demo and full installation?" I click yes, get the reboot but no ubuntu; just back to windows every time.

 

Please help a dummy out!

Edited by Aaron
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I read through 3 pages of posts and found nothing relevant . The forum seems to be for people who use Ubuntu already and have other questions.

 

I don't know why simple instructions -which are on the download ubuntu website, do not result in a simple outcome. Googling download issues produces a lot of people with the same complaint. All the advice I have read is simply a variation of following the website instructions, or some fairly complex programming commands and alterations.

 

I gave up a couple of months ago, and now after repeated attempts I am giving up again.

Edited by Aaron
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Well, almost giving up (see previous post). I really would like to use Ubuntu, so still hoping there is someone here who can help?

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Cipro

Dual booting is such a PITA, I wouldn't recommend it. If you want to run both, choose one as the host OS and get VMWare or a free virtual machine like VirtualBox, and run the other OS(es) there. For instance I either run Linux or Win7x64 as host (real OS) and VMWare, then in VMWare guests I run XP, Win7-32bit, Linux, whatever I like. Another option is the free version of ESX-Sever and then using the partitioned machine if you can live with remote access.

 

I find having a lot of machines and configurations available for development work invaluable.

 

 

 

i have the latest Ubuntu 11.10, i set it to do dual boot so i can choose what OS i will used since i do programming stuff. Openoffice and Skype will run perfectly with Ubuntu, and you can also use a virtual machine to run Windows Apps in a Linux Platform, its called Wine. Most softwares nowadays are multi platforms, means they can be installed in a PC, LINUX or a MAC. Also you need a Higher specs of hardware so your OS wont hang up, better install some graphics card on it to have a better performance, especially LINUX and a Higher RAM 2GB is good but 4gb of RAM is great.

 

Wine is a set of compatibility libraries, it is not a virtual machine.

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I have no preference to run both. I would probably just use Ubuntu but do not see where it tells you where or how to download from anywhere outside the current OS

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Cipro
  1. Download the ISO image
  2. Burn it to DVD
  3. Verify it
  4. Back up your data or get a replacement drive and swap.
  5. Boot the DVD and blow away Windows
  6. Run Linux

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