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Bill H

Unconventional pump boat part VII

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Bill H

The framing is all finished now. We spent several days fine tuning with a hand plane to make sure all was just right and when it was, we coated every surface that will not have something glued to it with epoxy primer paint. We did this because once the plywood skin is attached, many parts of the boat will be extremely difficult to access, so by applying the high quality epoxy primer paint now, we insure a long rot free life to the boats framing. Once everything was covered with two coats, we let the paint cure and then began the process of cutting the first plywood sheets which form the outer skin of the boat.

 

It's easy to see what is painted and what is not because the primer we used is dark gray in color. Most of the wood frame had already been covered in clear epoxy, but rot never sleeps, so we wanted to be sure all the wood in the boat was as protected as we could make it.

 

While the boys were cutting and fitting the plywood sheets, I hired a local boy to split bamboo slats for me. These slats will be used on the flooring frames so we don't have to walk in the bilge water and any cargo we might carry will be high and dry as well. I bout 50 bamboo poles not only for the slats but also the cross members which will support the bamboo outriggers.

 

Now that the boat has the first layer of plywood temporarily attached, we will begin to cut and fit the second layer. To add to the water tight integrity of the boat, all seams in the skin of the first layer will be covered by plywood in the seccond layer. Once both layers are epoxied in place and fastened, we will cover the remaining seams with epoxy putty, which will be faired and sanded, then the entire boat will get two coats of epoxy primer followed by two coats of epoxy paint as a top coat and color coat. Then the area that will be underwater most of the time will also receive anti-fouling bottom paint to keep marine borers from damaging the hull and help minimize marine growth.

 

Regards,

 

Bill

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It's starting to look like a boat.

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Bill H

Ahhh but will it float?? That is the question! :)

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Bill H

While I wait for my supplier to fill my long waited order for more laminating epoxy, we've been busy doing other things on the boat. Here is a picture of the bamboo sole we're installing. We also started roughing in the helmsman's station. As soon as the epoxy arrives, we'll epoxy the first and second layers of plywood skin and start painting.

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Bill H

It's been a while since I've posted pics. I still can't add a new topic, so I'll add them to the last post.

 

We've accomplished a lot these past few weeks, despite the earth quake. Two layers of plywood are now epoxied in place, to the sides and decks which effectively means the structural parts of this boat are now complete. From this point onward we'll be doing mostly cosmetic things including painting the boat inside and out.

 

You will notice in the pics below we've installed the cap rail, which has a secondary function of a splash guard to keep water coming up from waves from getting into the boat. Much of the gray/green coloring you're seeing in these pics is marine epoxy putty which we use over all seems, to fix any imperfections in the wood, fill nail holes etc.

 

After final sanding, the entire boat will be coated with clear laminating epoxy, then epoxy primer paint, followed by the top coat epoxy paint and finally the anti-fouling paint which will extend from the computed loaded water line down over the keel.

 

To facilitate all this exterior painting, we turned the boat upside down today. This makes our work on the bottom much easier.

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Bill H

This bow on view gives you a good idea of how fair the slim these hulls are. The difference between my boat and a traditional pump boat beyond my use of plywood for the keel, is this boat is much deeper than the traditional boat. This allows the boat to carry more weight and still handle rougher conditions off shore.

 

The stern on view, you get some sense of the flat keel, and how we blunted up the stern as opposed to the bow.

 

Bill

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