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JamesMusslewhite

Waterwheel Power - can help supply electrical needs

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Jess Bartone

The water drops the height of the wheel. Not "twice" the height of the wheel. The wheel diameter is the drop.

 

Ah I see.

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Esoy

I think if we combine the water wheel and rope pump would be ideal of further reducing cost of production when applied in a fish pond.

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Runian

I think if we combine the water wheel and rope pump would be ideal of further reducing cost of production when applied in a fish pond.

 

Dont know what a rope pump is, but what ab.

 

 

 

Edit

OFF topic so I'll make a forum 4 it ...

Edited by Runian
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JamesMusslewhite

this is a good way to capitalize on the drop from one rice platform to a lower platform, then using that drop to push water to an above-ground pond system.

 

 

and well worth a good look, because it requires no mechanism or power usage.

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JamesMusslewhite

I am lucky with my land because I have three water sources. A small stream and waterfall feature that splits into two smaller freshwater streams, which then runs along both sides of a large caladium field and the lower rice patties. There is a steady downward flow which could drive dozens of small water wheels; and can be directed to flow through a fish pond under construction. This allows a steady flow of stream water to be channeled through the various fish ponds, thus not requiring the usage of heavy water pumps and aerators Then we have a small artisan source which is 3/4 put the side of our back hillside of the farm, which in the next couple of years I will build various levels of concrete water tanks and water traps needed for hillside irrigation.where additional larger water wheels can be incorporated in their design.

 

This will save me considerable construction cost and maintenance expense and provide the electric for Lights, walkway lighting, security lights, and security systems. This water is continuous flow, thus being far more more reliable than solar or windmills. I know that I am lucky to have such a water rich property and this is just not a viable option for many. Those that do have usable water features, this could be a good solution for you to help supplement low-cost continuous usable electrical power..

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JamesMusslewhite

Dont know what a rope pump is, but what ab.

 

 

 

Edit

OFF topic so I'll make a forum 4 it ...

 

This one idea that would work well on my property to supply drinking troughs to future stock pens, duck ponds, and raised fish breeding tanks. Thanks for the link.. I will try to see if I can post your link so it is more viewable below.

 

Edited by JamesMusslewhite

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JamesMusslewhite

This is what I am trying to build on my farm. It will a simple earth construction, and I will use drainage pipe and heavy wire to build floating platforms to hold the containers I will use to grow vegetables. This will allow two separate revenue streams for your fish ponds.

 

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JamesMusslewhite

fisher paykel washing machine motors will work as alternators. i picked one up at the local rubbish dump for $5. neighbour uses one, powered by a 50 foot drop 1" hose. the supply pond refills slowly then automatically releases the water when full and this charges his battery bank. he inverts this to 240V (in oz) of an evening to supplement the mains. very nifty. worth considering when your annual bill is over a grand and espected to rise.

This is an excellent idea being that most washing machine pumps are pulley driven. Another idea that has great water movement power is a simple jacuzzi pump; most are closed systems that include a filter. They have a 2 inch threaded input and a 3 inch threaded output. I once used one to carry water through a 3 inch water pipe over 200 feet to nursery pad sprinklers. The little pump would drive over 42 whirly-bird 30 foot radius commercial sprinklers with authority. For a little $200 used pump it out performed $2,500 commercial water pumps.

JacuzziPump.jpg

 

They can be used to circulate large volumes of water and drive pond water features used to aerate fish ponds.

Edited by JamesMusslewhite

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goldote

Does this system really not need battery storage?

You can just plug in? Does it use a regulator to shut it down when not in use?

I've seen guys use tank type hot water heaters to bleed off extra power.

Unbelievable...what is the Philippines without brown outs?

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Runian

Does this system really not need battery storage?

You can just plug in? Does it use a regulator to shut it down when not in use?

I've seen guys use tank type hot water heaters to bleed off extra power.

Unbelievable...what is the Philippines without brown outs?

 

Pls quote the post your referring to m8t.

All power systems require power storage, it is just a matter of how u store it.

Hot water tank ? 50 -100 gallons ? maybe u can run a couple of low Wat Led's of that an hour or 3 / but how much to fill it :P

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Esoy

This is what I am trying to build on my farm. It will a simple earth construction, and I will use drainage pipe and heavy wire to build floating platforms to hold the containers I will use to grow vegetables. This will allow two separate revenue streams for your fish ponds.

 

Hi James, have you considered using a liner for your "earth pond"? the reason I ask is to isolate the pond water from contaminants from the earth? Have you played around with the "liners or tested" which one would be a good choice and low cost? Apologies for being out of topic but on the overall I guess it will impact production performance as well as cost ?

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JamesMusslewhite

Hi James, have you considered using a liner for your "earth pond"? the reason I ask is to isolate the pond water from contaminants from the earth? Have you played around with the "liners or tested" which one would be a good choice and low cost? Apologies for being out of topic but on the overall I guess it will impact production performance as well as cost ?

Yes I have and they are a good product. Goodyear make a pond liner that comes in large rollls. each roll come in 10 foot, 12 foot, and 16 foot (if I remember correctly) and each strip is layed with a 1 to 2 foot overlay; there is a double sided adhesive strip which is applied to the overlaps. The problem is they can puncture, so the ground must be grated smooth and a felt linner layed out before the Pond liner is applied. Goodyear claimes their product is good up to 15 years (also if I remember right) but is a bit pricy (that I do remember correctly).

 

I plan on making floating fish boxes lined with netting. Each box can hold up to 500 fish. The boxes will have approx. 2 foot of clearance from the pond bottom and the sides, which makes the fish unable to feed on the soils of the pond. This keeps the meat having a tainted taste and makes the fish easy to harvest; this also allows you to check for pregnant fish which you then move to birthing tanks to harvest the fingerlings.

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JamesMusslewhite

Something about this rig just appeals to my natural rigging-nature... :shocked:

 

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Headshot

Something about this rig just appeals to my natural rigging-nature... :shocked:

 

 

You could dramatically increase the efficiency of that water wheel by slightly tilting the buckets toward the water source so they will catch more water and less will just be spillage. The wheel will spin faster and with more torque. That will increase the power output.

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Tinbum

If i can add my 2c worth of insight to this thread.

Having recently moved here from rural France, i was lucky enough to live in (and still own coz its not sold....yet!) a 500 yr old watermill. Over the years wheel design changed from the simple wooden paddle type undershot wheel, with the blades arranged like bicycle spokes, to more complex designs in metal. The King of France actually offered a great prize to anyone who could drastically improve the performance of the humble water wheel in an attempt to modernise this ancient system.

A chap called M. Poncelet designed a curved paddle/ blade system which basically doubled the efficiency of this design. This was around the 1820's. However the waterwheel slowly became more and more obselete due to the industrial revolution, the introduction of steam engines and the development of water turbines which could generate the same power of a wheel but the unit was smaller in size.

The generation of electricity by re-using existing sites (such as mine) or by constructing new as in the OP, is definitley a viable and green alternative.

 

However often people over simplify the idea and don't understand the drawbacks.

Taking both a water wheel and micro hydro turbine, these are all dependant on one thing, water. It needs to flow in a regular controllable fashion. Controllable meaning you must be able to maintain flow in dry periods, but be able to divert excess in flood or rainy conditions. Regular meaning you need enough flow to actually achieve you needs.

A typical waterwheel of average size, say 6 metres dia. will generally turn at around 18rpm. This is fine for grinding flour, crushing oil etc, but there are not many ac generators out there that produce electricity at these speeds, if any at all.

So a gear system of "some sort" needs to be fitted to up the rpm to a more useable rate ,typically around 1500rpm.

Chosing to go for a dc system allows for lower rotational speeds, but the need for inverter technology to transform the dc into household ac. This system needs seperate consideration as supplying direct generated dc, via an inverter, will not power a house and the associated contents. It might run a few lightbulbs but thats about it.

This is where the often quoted "battery bank" comes in. However what is needed really, are large capacity batteries, and not just one! In a perfect situation we would have a few submarine batteries (nominal 2V but up to 5-6,000amps rating!) This way we have the "stored capacity" to run whatever we like, but only when required. Like having a 500hp car. You can go shopping in it, but also blow off most other things in your area! Power when needed.

 

Over or under production, caused by water flow conditions in the main, lead to associated problems. Underflow of water, summer or drought ,results in under generation of electricity. A lot of electrical items can handle a drop in the necessary voltage, but a lot can't, TV's, computers etc. With a regulator in the generation system, over voltage rarely exists, but raises certain requirements. In times of flood or high water flow, our wheel will be whizzing around like mad. We will be producing more electricity than we need, things will be getting hot, very hot. Its not just a case of go turn on the kettle! Sometimes the excess heat is used to pre-heat domestic supply via an immersed coil, sometimes just the regulator is placed in a cooling channel to soak away the excess or several other methods.

Selection of the correct size(capacity) generator will alleviate the problem of not being able to supply what our house needs. Again, as above with the battery bank system, investing in larger to cover all eventualities does pay off. One of the first considerations of installing the generator is "what do i need it to power?" This requires forethought, planning and then factoring in an element of surplus.

 

If you are still with me? i hope that i've shown that the OP is very viable, but does need lots of additional thought!!

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