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JamesMusslewhite

Waterwheel Power - can help supply electrical needs

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JamesMusslewhite

I posted this in another thread and even in a wrong thread. A comment from another member made me decide to repost it, but as an independent thread. This system can be used to generate power for a multible range of usage. Using a waterwheel and an automoble generator and uses gravity more than water flow to power the wheel or wheels. So I thought I would share this idea with the forum.

 

 

 

 

I can produce smaller units that can be easily used to solve your problems. There are homes that generate most of their home electrical needs using such systems. I have owned pickup trucks that used an extra generators to produce a 110v 60 cycles electrical outlet. One wheel can generate enough to power several quality water pumps 24/7 being totally independent of either sun or wind. Why try to reevent the wheel? Clean, green, and simplistic. This is what I am going to use around my farm to solve my needs and seriously reduce my electrical costs, on pumps, night lites, and security systems for my ponds, home, and farm.

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Jess Bartone

They look like a handyman with a few tools could knock one of them up fairly easily.

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JamesMusslewhite

This video shows how a gearing system workes to power the generator. Sorry but video will not post.

 

Edited by JamesMusslewhite

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Runian

yeah seen that as well, I just hope I can find a river with water year round near my farm

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JamesMusslewhite

yeah seen that as well, I just hope I can find a river with water year round near my farm

 

They can be used in a small enclosed pond system. Water only needs to be recirculated to drop over the top of the waterwheel, gravity handles the rest.

Edited by JamesMusslewhite

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Runian

They can be used in a small enclosed pond system. Water only needs to be recircualted to drop over the top of the waterwheel, gravity handles the rest.

 

yeah as long as you get rain to refill the pond

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JamesMusslewhite

yeah as long as you get rain to refill the pond

water spickets, garden hoses, city water, water wells... there are lots of ways to fill such a system if in a small enclosed pond system. You can go Solar, but overcasts and night restricts effectiveness, and wind power only works with a breeze; but each requires expensive batteries setup and great maintenance expense. Water is still the cheapest powersourse and can be operated 24/7. even at night, with no breeze, and in the rain. Tropics...

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thebob

I think the main problem is having a a suitable amount of flowing water with enough drop.

 

With a gravity wheel you need the water to drop the height of the wheel.

 

With a 6 foot drop and 100 cubic feet per min you will make about 1hp. So 288000 cubic feet per day. (approximately 8000 cubic meters per day per HP.)

 

A pond sounds like a good idea for a short time back up but you will have to add power to the system to pump the water back up to the pond.

 

I have thought of using a paddle wheel in an irrigation channel.

 

Automotive alternators need electrical power to make power so you still need a battery. A permanent magnet alternator doesn't need power to energize the coils.

 

For example

 

http://www.windstuff...rom_scratch.htm

 

There are also permanent magnet rotors available for the common AC Delco range of automotive alternators.

Edited by thebob
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Alan S

Samar has the most and the most regular supplies of water.

There has been several studies to set up mini hydro electric plants there.

Some parts of Leyte are alos possible.

(I dont doubt there are many other possiblities, but can only comment on those I know about.)

 

It is quite feasible, and there is a vast amount of information available, both on the internet and in books.

 

Good fun too!

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sperman

fisher paykel washing machine motors will work as alternators. i picked one up at the local rubbish dump for $5. neighbour uses one, powered by a 50 foot drop 1" hose. the supply pond refills slowly then automatically releases the water when full and this charges his battery bank. he inverts this to 240V (in oz) of an evening to supplement the mains. very nifty. worth considering when your annual bill is over a grand and espected to rise.

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PapaRay

I wish I had the knowledge to do something like this, sounds interesting

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Jess Bartone

 

With a gravity wheel you need the water to drop the height of the wheel.

 

This is erroneous. The water can flow from directly above the wheel, just enough to clear the moving parts, it definitely does not need any drop as the wheel turns from the weight of water slowly filling the buckets. Having it fall so far would make a lot of splash and most of the energy would be lost. This design of water wheel does not rely on water velocity, just sufficient flow to fill the buckets making one side heavier than the other. Fairly basic Newtonian science.

 

For those outside the city there are myriad streams and springs with permanent flow, at least where we're building there is.

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Alan S

For the conventional (horizontal shaft) waterwheel, there are several options:

Undershot, Overshot, Breast-shot ( high and low breast) being the main ones.

(Some are made to turn in the reverse direction for specific purposes.)

 

Which type to use depends upon the flow and drop.

 

An undershot wheel needs considerable flow (mass of water) with little drop in height, and is the type used in, for example, a flowing river.

The overshot wheel works on the amount of water falling a distance, and will work on far less water, but needs the fall to make use of gravity.

 

And then there are Pelton wheels, Norse wheels, and many others.

 

If, when using a pond (at the top of a hill) to feed the wheel you wish to reverse the process to get water to the top again, (and use it when demand is greatest) then you dont need to pump it. A hydraulic ram will work as will several other ways of moving water up hill.

 

It is a fascinating subject, but does need some study / research to make the best use of it.

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thebob

 

This is erroneous. The water can flow from directly above the wheel, just enough to clear the moving parts, it definitely does not need any drop as the wheel turns from the weight of water slowly filling the buckets. Having it fall so far would make a lot of splash and most of the energy would be lost. This design of water wheel does not rely on water velocity, just sufficient flow to fill the buckets making one side heavier than the other. Fairly basic Newtonian science.

 

For those outside the city there are myriad streams and springs with permanent flow, at least where we're building there is.

 

The water drops the height of the wheel. Not "twice" the height of the wheel. The wheel diameter is the drop.

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Ozepete

If you have a stream nearby that falls 5 to10 meters or more, you could consider an axial flow turbine. Very efficient as it is direct drive (no belt or chain drive loses) and can produce serious output, 2000+watts (2KW) with a 10 meter head and that is 240VAC, so no loss in inverting (>20% loss) and a fraction of the cost and wattage loss with transmission line.

http://www.diytrade.com/china/4/products/7804683/Volute_axial_flow_water_turbine_generator_300w-15kw.html

 

Cheers.

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