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Advice: What kind of Camera takes pictures like this?


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scoobie007

These days your spoilt for choice with the two leading manufacturers Canon & Nikon. In both ranges there is something for everyones budget.Entry level Canon is the 1100D v its Nikon D3100 counterpart. These are both cameras where you can buy a range of interchangeable lenses again to suit your budget and needs, beauty is you can add lenses to your range as you progress in skill etc.

Ball park figure would be around 44,000 Pesos for a Canon complete with lens (Macy's at AS Fortuna,Mandaue have a good selection). Not sure about the Nikon

but its going to be around the same price. It is worth shopping around though for the best deal - cash of course getting you discount here.

Edited by scoobie007
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The effect is called Depth of Field and cameras have been doing it forever. Digital Single Lens Reflex cameras have interchangeable and adjustable lens so they can give you diferent focal lengths whi

Hi Steve,   Depth of field is controlled by having a large sensor and large (or numerically small) aperture. Shutter speed controls motion blur.   For best results use a f2.8 or numerically small

Bob Atkins has forgotten more about the physics of photography than all us combined will ever know, here are a few links.

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Had an afterthought. Have you tried using the special effects in Google Picasa. It is very very easy to use. Apart from cropping photos it also has some special effects such as leaving a circle in focus and making the rest of the photo blurred. In addition the option to increase the fill light can save a photo by revealing detail that is otherwise too dark,

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Even some pocket cameras will let you focus on something close and the background will be unfocused, in fact I would be suprised if this hasn't been the case for many years. Film cameras have been able to do this for over a century.

Edited by jme
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The description says it is "DSLR-Like". Not sure what that means,

 

SLR cameras have a mirror that folds up when you press the shutter. When you looked through the eyepiece of an SLR you saw the image refected by the mirror from the lens to the eyepiece behind the mirror was the film when you pressed the shutter the mirror would fold up and allow the light to hit the film. Your Sony has no mirror so is not a DSLR but it has many feautres in common with DSLR's one is the same size sensor as a lot of DSLRs but not as big as a 35 mm format.

 

To decide what is good for you really depends on what you want a camera to give you and how much control you want over how much control you give the camera.

 

Shutter speed controls the light as well. Aperture and shutter speed are manipulated together to control the amount of light reaching the "film" to give an optimum exposure ie correct exposure. Aperture affects the Depth Of Field. Controlling the light through aperture and speed gives you control of DOF plus distance. I learnt my photography on 35 mm film single lens reflex cameras back in the days when men walked with dinosaurs.

 

On a 35 mm format size camera if you wanted to get a shallow depth of field in bright light like a very sunny day, to get the out of focus background. Say the light reading is F16 at 250? To get a shallower depth of field you have to increase the shutter speed while opening up the aperture to give more light and less depth of field until you found the right balance if your camera can shoot at very fast speeds, or, get very close to the subject. Now it seems the Sony does it for you in-camera.

 

For example in a 35mm format with your aperture starting at F16 at 250, (F16 gives you a wide DOF) to keep the exposure the same you would adjust to F11 at 500 then F8 at 1000 to F5 at 2000 then F4 at 4000. Distance can affect the outcome too. In the pre-digital days there were markings on 35mm lens to help you work out the relationship between F stop and distance to help you be aware of the depth of field.

 

With digital Photography all that changed the "film" became the sensor and it took a long while before digital sensors were made equal to 35 mm film.

 

35 mm was the traditional format for most photography there were larger format cameras but the basic standard was the 35 mm which means most digital cameras had sensors whose format were smaller than 35 mm and therefore were not as good as 35 film. Meaning they couldnt produce the same results depth of field being one. Digital formats were compared to the 35 mm film format. Most digital cameras had small format sensors so you couldnt calculate the depth of field the same as a 35 mm format.

 

Understanding the principle of DOF and the limitation or advantage of your cameras sensor is one of many ways you can be creative with a camera if you want to be. Taking photos and checking the results and making adjustments is the way to learn Digital has made the learning curve much quicker and cheaper.

 

Digital cameras are getting better at making all the decisions all the time and the Sony seems to have in-camera tools to create visual effects like unfocused backgrounds. Buying a camera seems to me to depend on how much control you want in being creative.

 

There is a strange new kind of camera available that lets you select the area of focus after you have taken your shot called a Light Field Camera by Lytro might be worth your looking into.

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The description says it is "DSLR-Like". Not sure what that means...

 

OK so I researched this camera, first, let's tackle dSLR-like. SLR means "Single Lens Reflex", or that there is a single lens you look though and, at the moment of exposure, the optical path is changed (a moving mirror typically) and the precise optical path you were viewing is then used to make your image. If your finger is over the lens, you see it in the viewfinder :yahoo:

 

This is "SLR-like" in that the image you see on the LCD is coming in via the same lens that will make the actual image. On top of that, most SLRs have interchangeable lenses, although it's not technically a requirement. This camera also has a lens that can be dismounted and replaced.

 

 

Now for the camera. Short version: I don't' see how you can go wrong with it for under $400, with a few caveats.

 

  • It is a Sony, so it's BetaMAX. You have to use their damn memory sticks etc. but Beta was always better so ....
  • Te menu layout and some controls are reported to be a little "consumer electronics" and not natural to camera people.
  • The current lens lineup is limited
  • The flash mount is non-standard .... Sony again

 

 

Now the good stuff, and there's lots of it. A few high points:

 

  • It's not a full 35mm frame and so restricting DoF will be a little harder than a full frame SLR. It is however an APS form factor, which is a nice sized sensor, same as the D40 mentioned earlier and about 2/3 as big linearly as a 35mm, it's a nice size. It's the same as typical budget dSLRs and should give a lot of creative control.
  • It shoots HD video.
  • The lenses that are available are decent pro-sumer quality.
  • Sony will almost surely be supporting this new mount with more lenses AND cameras.

 

 

I wouldn't buy it for myself simply because of the control layout and memory stick thing, but if those don't bother you it's a hell of a lot of camera for very little cash. Again, I don't' see how you can go wrong with it for under $400.

 

 

Good review here.

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TheMatrix

There is a strange new kind of camera available that lets you select the area of focus after you have taken your shot called a Light Field Camera by Lytro might be worth your looking into.

 

Ahhh... yeah! You can click on any portion of image you want focused after the shot is taken. That's cool.

They demo it well here: http://www.lytro.com/living-pictures/1698

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Those are cool but when I looked into it they were pretty low resolution for the money. Sort of an early adopter thing. There is a great wikipedia article on the technology.

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TheMatrix

Those are cool but when I looked into it they were pretty low resolution for the money. Sort of an early adopter thing. There is a great wikipedia article on the technology.

 

Yeah, you're right... and no flash either! :)

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Experienced

Steve,

 

A "term of art" you may be interested in is "bokeh" -- photo geeks have been pursuing it for a long time. While sharpness is determined by depth of field which varies directly with aperture size, the "quality of the blurring" in the out of focus areas is an optical characteristic of specific lens designs. Google that term and you'll find lots of discussion related to your topic.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bokeh

http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/bokeh.htm

http://www.photoble.com/photography-tips-tricks/how-to-7-quick-tips-to-create-bokeh-with-digital-camera

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Late to the game, but here's my 2 cents worh...

 

The effect you're looking for is commonly called bokeh...

http://www.advancedp...e-bokeh-effect/

 

It's the holy grail for many photographers and they spend thousands of dollars in equipment chasing it.

 

The camera in your first post may be $400 but you will not get the quality of pictures in that post with the "kit" lens for $400. My guess is the lens that took those pictures is even more expensive than this very nice lens on amazon: http://www.amazon.co...26903001&sr=1-3

 

Note the picture of the girl in the sample photos for that lens.

 

If you really want to get educated on photography, www.dpreview.com is a good place to start, they have excellent reviews and user forums.

 

Another thing that I think you're already aware of is the bulk with an interchangeable lens system. My dDLR is a Nikon d700 and i have 3 very large lens that cover all of my personal requiremnts. It takes excellent photos however it's a PITA to take on a trip. It's almost like having a child along. The backpack for it and the lens is about the same size :b plus I have to worry about theft as it's an expensive rig.

 

Since photography is my main hobby I have two other cameras to travel light - a Canon s95 and a Canon SX40, you might look into them to see if they would suit your needs better.

 

Btw, I recommend the s95 (or cheaper s90 or newer s100) for you. It takes good low light pictures and is a very small package.

 

Hope my ramblings were useful to you.

 

Dave

 

Edit: Not fair! Experienced posted while I was composing my post!

Edited by Ronin
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Experienced

Edit: Not fair! Experienced posted while I was composing my post!

 

Yes, but you have the S95... that's one hell of a great little camera!

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I have a G10 and the EOS-5dmk2, but his little Sony isn't anywhere near the size of the dSLR. More like a 4:3 system or something but with a full APS-C sensor. Pretty impressive really. The kit zoom lens is not excellent but the little prime looks nice - I'd get both and then wait for a more "serious" lens to be released later.

 

Looks like Sony is intending to make it a "system", which is nice.

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TheMatrix

Great stuff. Thanks guys!

 

I like Bokeh now! (sounds like buko!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by TheMatrix
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Experienced

And for those who just can't decide WHAT to focus on... you can always get one of these!

 

A buddy of mine has one... it's pretty amazing.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Steve, if you are still shopping have a look at the Canon G1 X, if not, enjoy your new camera.

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