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Bill H

Unconventional pump boat part VI

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Bill H

At this point in the project progress is slow because we spend most of our time planing and sanding to be sure the plywood skin fits just right. However, today we laid in the deck beams on the bow, it was so much fun we did it twice! I'll explain, I showed the boy where the beams were to start, but was in a hurry to go pick up my new to me bike. I wanted a larger bike to make commuting to the City easier and found a nice used one in Badian town. When I got back, the boys had finished the deck beams on the bow and were starting on the stern, but wait! No camber! I looked at the beams and I ask them, where's the camber? I get a blank stare. They build boats with flat decks here, who would have guessed. So, I explain deck camber and why its important to facilitate water running off the deck insted of standing in puddles. Great idea they said. So we come up with a plan to save the existing frames by adding camber strips to them epoxied in place. It worked like a charm, but took up the rest of the day, so tomorrow we'll do the stern.

 

The two pics show the finished bow deck framing and give you a better view of the stern framing before we add the stern deck framing.

post-8579-0-49333900-1326802601_thumb.jpg

post-8579-0-47570800-1326802624_thumb.jpg

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SkyMan

They probably figure if the deck gets wet, the next wave will tip it and the water will run off.

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Mr. Mike

"camber",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,I love it when you talk nautical! :dance: It's looking goooooood!

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Stranded Shipscook

Yeah, they don't do that here (camber), as they use almost all deckspace for storing things (unsecured).

And seldom go out in heavy weather also.

The little puddles dry within minutes actually.

 

I didn't had camber on my catamaran bows either, wasn't a big deal actually, as the bows were just like banca size.In the end i liked it, cause i, or better the guests never "slipped" either to the side on moist decks.

 

And decks are always moist, or worn, or salty and therefore slippery, or very new and therefore slippery, or all together a bit.... :dance:

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Bill H

But it's all good, remember that!

 

Bill

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fanboat

sitting around in my moalboal ocean view room the other day

i noticed several boats sporting outboard motors

any comment?

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Bill H

sitting around in my moalboal ocean view room the other day

i noticed several boats sporting outboard motors

any comment?

 

A few. I've priced them here and they are very, very pricey. Two stroke models suck fuel at a rate 30% higher than 4 stroke. How deep are your pockets? I'd be a little worried about theft here. It's not all that difficult to pop off the ob and carry it off. The design of most pump boats puts the operator near amidships so you end up having to have a very long extension to the handle. The design of most local boats has a very narrow stern, baically the stern and the bow are interchangeable. This gives not much buoyancy to support the weight of the outboard perched on the transome and the transomes tend to be very high. I think for outbords to work well, you would have to design a pumpboat from the beginning for outboard power. Easy to do, but not commonly done here.

 

For sure there would be some advantages. Reverse, the ability to lift engine out of the water when not in use to name two, but to realize those advantages, you'd need a boat designed for an outboard and most pump boats are not.

 

Regards,

 

Thomas

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fanboat

agreed

the outboard motor cost big bucks,but are super fast.

 

ps..i like your shop....keep the pics coming.

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Mandala

When i was a teenager, backin the 60's, my first boat was an old 15 ft fishing dory. It had been adapted to use a small outboard motor (5-8hp) by installing a "well " in the flat bottom, the well was about 18" x 18" square and about the same in height. and was about 30" in from the stern and it worked very good. you could even turn the old motors around 180 degree for reverse if motor did not have one. only trouble was when you came into shallow water, or beached the boat , you would have to lift motor out of the well (pretty easy with small motor). the dory is shaped similar to what you are building (very narrow transom with a flat or small rocker to the bottom, but of course no outrigger , haha. I am sure you have seen one somewhere, but just an idea to keep in mind for the future. ( worked much better than trying to attach an outboard motor to the transom)

thanks for the update, keep the pics coming

Rick

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Bill H

Yup a well can work well, but they tend to restrict the motors ability to "kick up" so are more suseptible to damage from hitting objects in shallow water. They also have to be pretty robust because of the forces involved from the thrust and weight of the motor.

 

Also does not address their ability to be stollen fairly easily and to be much more costly than the traditional pump boat motore.

 

Bill

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Mandala

BillH, what are you planing for a motor?

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Bill H

I paid about 13,000p for the 12hp diesel in my current boat, a made in China cheepy. I'm not all that happy with it, so for the new boat I went with a 8hp gasoline, electric start model, better quality. That was about 16,000p give or take. You can get some very cheap motors from China, but they last months at best. We broke the recoil starter on the diesel on the 4th use. I'm in the process of trying to retrofit it with electric start. I'm working on a deal to carry engines in my boat building supply store. We'll see how that goes.

 

Bill

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Headshot

Where was the 8 hp Gas motor made? And brand?

Edited by Headshot

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Bill H

China, but it's one of the better made motors there and carries a one year warranty. I don't have the brand name handy, Ill dredge it up later for you. Let me know if you're interested in one, I'm going to stock them.

 

Bill

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