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Current Price for Copra


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BossHog

Back down to 12 from a recent high of 19. Given the rampant inflation I can't get a crew to harvest coconuts. It's just not worth it for them. 

Be better off setting up a coconut lawn bowling alley at this point.

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A few years ago I had to go to the hospital because of a kidney stone. Worst pain ever. I was prescribed something for the urinary tract and potassium sulfate(?). I stopped taking the medicine after 2

From 22 to 32 in the space of a month! Everyone here is making copra like mad. Christmas windfall in an otherwise shitty year.

It is. But it's not a full time job, it couldn't be as it's hard work indeed. First you climb the trees and get the coconuts, crack them open with an axe, and use a tool to extract the 'meat'. Then yo

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BossHog
On 4/30/2014 at 10:18 AM, Davaoeno said:

mmmm sounds like your coconuts are like watermelons - 90% water !! 

Got a meter for water content, And you can bet your sweet ass the Chinaman (and they're all Chinese or Chinoy) copra buyer has one too and adjusts the price accordingly.

mono10936606-090311-02.jpg.9f9a040aeafa51fac47e19ed3e39d3ec.jpg

 

Edited by BossHog
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BossHog

22 per kilo today on the island here. I suspect the price on the mainland is much higher though. With all the transportation restrictions I think we're getting seriously undercut on the price. Getting Covid-ed once again, lol.

 

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Salty Dog

You wouldn't believe the price of packaged coconut water from the Philippines here in the USA.

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cvgtpc1
54 minutes ago, BossHog said:

22 per kilo today on the island here. I suspect the price on the mainland is much higher though. With all the transportation restrictions I think we're getting seriously undercut on the price. Getting Covid-ed once again, lol.

 

Seen the YouTube videos, harvesting is pretty labor intensive!

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BossHog
8 minutes ago, cvgtpc1 said:

harvesting is pretty labor intensive!

It is. But it's not a full time job, it couldn't be as it's hard work indeed. First you climb the trees and get the coconuts, crack them open with an axe, and use a tool to extract the 'meat'. Then you gotta fire-smoke the meat and then bag it for sale to the buyer. We just did 4 hectares and it took the crew* two and a half days. The smoking is done overnight and you gotta be awake to tend the fire. They're pretty much awake and working for several days.

*Two guys working their tails off and they had their kids helping out (school hasn't restarted here; not even distance learning). They get a third (1/3) of the final sale to the copra buyer. In this instance their cut was 12,400 pesos for two and a half days work. Sounds like nothing or a lot depending on your perspective I guess: it's all relative.

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BossHog
28 minutes ago, Salty Dog said:

You wouldn't believe the price of packaged coconut water from the Philippines here in the USA.

We've had that stuff running into the ground all weekend. I do get the workers to fill up some glass pitchers a few times a day when the harvest is on. They say it's healthy but I reckon that's over-blown marketing talk. It is tasty though (especially mixed with rum, haha).

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HeyMike
6 minutes ago, BossHog said:

We've had that stuff running into the ground all weekend. I do get the workers to fill up some glass pitchers a few times a day when the harvest is on. They say it's healthy but I reckon that's over-blown marketing talk. It is tasty though (especially mixed with rum, haha).

 

A few years ago I had to go to the hospital because of a kidney stone. Worst pain ever. I was prescribed something for the urinary tract and potassium sulfate(?). I stopped taking the medicine after 2 days because I could not even walk up a flight of stairs without stopping to catch my breath.

My wife told me to drink a tall glass of buko juice every morning to get rid of the stone. The stone either passed or dissolved after a few days after drinking the buko juice.  I was peeing almost normal after about 4 days. I will not underestimate the medicinal value of buko juice. It saved me a lot of  pain.

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cvgtpc1
24 minutes ago, BossHog said:

It is. But it's not a full time job, it couldn't be as it's hard work indeed. First you climb the trees and get the coconuts, crack them open with an axe, and use a tool to extract the 'meat'. Then you gotta fire-smoke the meat and then bag it for sale to the buyer. We just did 4 hectares and it took the crew* two and a half days. The smoking is done overnight and you gotta be awake to tend the fire. They're pretty much awake and working for several days.

*Two guys working their tails off and they had their kids helping out (school hasn't restarted here; not even distance learning). They get a third (1/3) of the final sale to the copra buyer. In this instance their cut was 12,400 pesos for two and a half days work. Sounds like nothing or a lot depending on your perspective I guess: it's all relative.

Wondered how the payout worked if you hired somebody.  Family used to harvest on our land till Yolanda took down most of the trees.  12,400 vs the 300 a day laborer pay is pretty good imo.

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cvgtpc1
5 minutes ago, HeyMike said:

 

A few years ago I had to go to the hospital because of a kidney stone. Worst pain ever. I was prescribed something for the urinary tract and potassium sulfate(?). I stopped taking the medicine after 2 days because I could not even walk up a flight of stairs without stopping to catch my breath.

My wife told me to drink a tall glass of buko juice every morning to get rid of the stone. The stone either passed or dissolved after a few days after drinking the buko juice.  I was peeing almost normal after about 4 days. I will not underestimate the medicinal value of buko juice. It saved me a lot of  pain.

Hearing my wife's stories of her lolo, the Philippine forests are like a pharmacy if you know what you're doing.

Edited by cvgtpc1
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Ozepete
1 hour ago, BossHog said:

It is. But it's not a full time job, it couldn't be as it's hard work indeed. First you climb the trees and get the coconuts, crack them open with an axe, and use a tool to extract the 'meat'. Then you gotta fire-smoke the meat and then bag it for sale to the buyer. We just did 4 hectares and it took the crew* two and a half days. The smoking is done overnight and you gotta be awake to tend the fire. They're pretty much awake and working for several days.

*Two guys working their tails off and they had their kids helping out (school hasn't restarted here; not even distance learning). They get a third (1/3) of the final sale to the copra buyer. In this instance their cut was 12,400 pesos for two and a half days work. Sounds like nothing or a lot depending on your perspective I guess: it's all relative.

Good on you for paying them fairly and decent.  :thumbsup: 

It pisses me off to read/ hear of tight arsed expats, many living off their governments tit, who begrudgingly pay miserable minimum amounts to employ locals to work for them, often in extreme conditions.  

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hyaku

P27 a kilo here in Region 8.

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mikecon3

We got P25 a kilo in Masbate, but that was 3 weeks ago. It seems you're at the mercy of the buyer most of the time.

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cvgtpc1

Is there an average number of coconuts to produce one kilo?  I know I can google but you guys are actually doing it lol

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hyaku
13 hours ago, cvgtpc1 said:

Is there an average number of coconuts to produce one kilo?  I know I can google but you guys are actually doing it lol

Chopped and dried it's around 8/10 kg a large sack.

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