Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
BossHog

Current Price for Copra

Recommended Posts

Davaoeno

 

 

all that rain has more than doubled the yield this harvest. 

 

 

mmmm sounds like your coconuts are like watermelons - 90% water !!  :ROFLMAO:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hyaku

Mine are slowly coming back after Yolanda. I harvested the two days before the event. That's 6 months. Think I might clear the land and fertilize. I give the climbers a cut so even if the price is up they get more too. Not many will work hourly these days.

 

Everyone's garden is like a lumber yard here. Germelina seasoning everywhere. No need to use coco lumber. It fine till it gets wet. So fibrous its like a roll of toilet tissue. Found some nice black coco for weapons but again too fibrous to withstand any severe impact.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Humboldt

We have been selling per coconut 5 peso's each . Filipino will show up truck and crew ,  

I just have our helper count the coconuts and off they go ,,,it was somewhat of a hassle to process on property before

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
musicman666

Coco palms throw a lot of shade thus not much sun for growing veggies.

 

We grow peanuts between some trees that are widely spaced.

 

 

Pro tip: when smoking yer copra buy the largest yellowfin tuna you can find and stick it in the rafters of the smoke-house (tapahan) for a few days.

 

Brilliant smoked fish with a great orange color.

Also water....it's a hard battle to grow in the vicinity of a trees root system.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knowdafish

I just sold 2 sacks (73kg) in Biliran province for 30 P per kilo but it was only sun dried. They were offering 37 for fire cooked and there were prices down as low as 24 depending on degree of moisture and quality of product.

 

So they have the ability to check moisture content while you wait? I always wondered about that. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knowdafish
Do coconut trees, either for VCO or copra, produce a higher return than annual crops?

 

It depends on what the crop is. Sugarcane, rice, and strawberries can easily net more $$ per hectare than copra, as does lettuce and some of the other veggies, but they also require more input. How hard do you want to work?

 

We (FIL & MIL) grow sugarcane, rice, beans (mung beans and string beans), feed corn, peanuts, gemmolina (and soon mahogany), sweet potato, arrow root, and coconuts and have grown watermelon and various types of squash in the past. Our coconut palms are young though and we are still waiting for that 1st harvest. 

 

All the tree are planted around the perimeter with a few exceptions (one coconut palm, 3 mango, and some kind of small berry tree that the kids like to eat, but which I forget the name of) which shade the farm house. That leaves plenty of room and sun for other crops. 

 

A friend has quite a few coconut palms and she wants to grow coffee and cacao between them which I hear is completely do-able as they both like some shade. Her property is at elevation with a to-die-for view! 

Edited by Knowdafish
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RogerDuMond

Just as an aside we feed a mixture of feed and 20% copra meal to our animals. The cost of the copra meal is 11.5 pesos per kilo.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knowdafish

 

 

Will you plant “Philippine Mahogany” or “Luan” as it's known by?

 

Mahogany. Prices here for seedlings range from "free" to 50p each. I want to plant at least 20. By the time my son reaches college age they should be a big boost towards school expenses. He is only 3 now. I don't think the demand, or the price, for hardwoods will ever go down as the demand is too great and always growing. There are other exotic hardwoods that are worth even more $$ if someone has the space and the time. 

 

I think it pays to diversify in farming as it does to use as much of the land as possible and not let it sit idle. 

 

Now if I can only keep my FIL from "borrowing" any more trees we will be doing great! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
spydoo

There's an interesting phenomenon that some trees exude chemicals (called allelochemicals) that affect the growth of other plant species. It's called allelopathy. In only some cases have scientists been able to identify those chemicals, however many studies have found a difference in crop yield in company with other plants, so the theory is that allelopathy is the cause.

 

The reason this is relevant is that some of these studies have found increased yield in coconut plantations when other crops are planted with it. For example, one study found a sustained increase in coconut yield of over 70% when inter-spaced with cacao and of over 90% with cinnamon. 

 

So, not only is the inter-space crop a bonus, coconut yield should also be higher when inter-cropping with some species. 

 

Bear in mind some crops have the opposite effect (negative allelopathy) so it's good to read the research that has already been done on the species you may want to plant with your coconuts.

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BossHog

20 pesos and fifty centavos a kilogram this morning.

 

it had gotten as low as 18 over the weekend so it's not too bad.

 

I could calculate the percentage difference between 29 (last harvest) and 20.50 (this harvest)

 

but I'm a retard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Salty Dog

20 pesos and fifty centavos a kilogram this morning.

 

it had gotten as low as 18 over the weekend so it's not too bad.

 

I could calculate the percentage difference between 29 (last harvest) and 20.50 (this harvest)

 

but I'm a retard.

 

Your getting about 30 percent less than what you were getting last harvest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BossHog

Had been holding steady around 21-22 per kilo but has just crept up to 29. 

 

Time to harvest.

 

Any other current price reports from around the islands?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BossHog

Yes!

Capture.JPG.bc938b1807ba3ef2c2b89e3853d947a2.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BossHog

Down to 15 per kilo locally. That's the lowest it's been in quite some time.

  • Sad 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JamesMusslewhite
On 1/12/2012 at 1:31 AM, BossHog said:

Copra is a commodity that fluctuates wildly in value.

About 12 pesos a kilo/ Siargao today.

 

   Perhaps you should think about starting VCO cold-press production or heat-process cooking oil. Heat-process cooking oil has a 2 year shelf life and cold-pressed VCO has a 10 year shelf life. The heat-process cooking oil production also yields coconut water which can be used to make ice candy treats, and the cooking process yields the browned cooked coconut meat which can be used to make candy. The VCO process yields coconut water, cream cream, coconut flower and the clean white meat which can be dried and grated. These each can generate additional revenue streams and generate much higher profits from your trees than you are presently yielding from copra production.

   The husks and shells can be used to cook the oil and then the ash and charcoal used as soil amendments in gardens or grow beds.  

 

Edited by JamesMusslewhite
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..