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BossHog

Current Price for Copra

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Denis

For what it is worth....

 

I have never been involved with copra/coconut oil but did spend a couple of years in the back office of an olive oil grower/producer with domestic/export sales so can appreciate the differences and similarities.

 

the real market to follow is for coconut oil... http://www.indexmundi.com/commodities/?commodity=coconut-oil 

 

a quick google indicates that India seems to be a prime driver of the copra/coconut oil market because of their domestic demand which seems inelastic so they have to make up shortfall in domestic production with imports...... maybe that's what drove the Indians into the Philippines prior to the spanish!

 

one of the other factors that may drive demand for copra/coconut oil is the price of crude oil and epa bio fuel admixture regulation as coconut oil appears to have a high biodiesel coefficient!

 

given that the oil yield from copra is approximately 60%+ you potentially sold 900 liters of diesel!

Edited by No Fixed Address
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Portaz

Interesting in australia I'm involved in the horse industry and we sell heaps of copra, one of the mills here burnt Down and some other issue on one of the islands Fiji I think, has caused a massive shortage and subsequent price hike in ground copra meal is it the same product you guys are producing?

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JSL-USMC

My wife's sister today told me P28 Kilo

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Humboldt

3.5 peso's per coconut , they do all the processing harvesting drying etc

south of Cebu city about 3 hrs Alcoy

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hyaku

I hope they make coco lumber out of those felled coconut trees and rebuild with it. You can use it for walls in interior partitions and ceiling joists for a simple home. Sometimes they even use it for roof trusses and roof joists. It will probably be a lot better than some of the homes they have now.

 

Its like a battlefield on my land. Quite a few weeks of chainsawing to be done when I can return but mostly germelina

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JamesMusslewhite

The Philippines produces 40% of the world's coconut oil and the typhoons this year has destroyed over 20% of the coconut trees here in the Philippines, which should cause a reduction of world-wide coconut oil production. One should expect at least a moderate rise in copra prices for the next 5-8 years as trees will need time to be re-planted and or mature.

 

 

we have approximately 1000 coconut trees which consistently yields a minimum of 1,800 kilograms of copra each harvest time and we harvest these trees three time a year.

Edited by JamesMusslewhite

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BossHog

James,

 

Do you transport your copra from Dinagat to Surigao or sell it locally?

 

Care to comment on the price difference and current local prices? Thanks

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JamesMusslewhite

James,

 

Do you transport your copra from Dinagat to Surigao or sell it locally?

 

Care to comment on the price difference and current local prices? Thanks

We sell to a copra buyer on the island who then collects, loads, and ships the bagged copra from Dinagat Island to the City. I have never directly sold copra to the City dealers. The time and transportation expenses just seemed cost prohibitive. I want to form a small copra and farm co-op among the farmers in our area so we can collectively get our product to the city markets. This is one for that reason I am now designing a boat I want to build this coming year. I can transfer our copra and harvested crops,and that of our neighbors, to the city markets and buyers and simply share the diesel cost, this way we can all sell direct to the City dealers where the selling price is higher. We can choose where we want to dock as well as the scheduling times of departures which is not the case when using the passenger boats.  This would allow us to dock at the Boulevard, behind the city jail, or beside the smaller wet market where we can easily offload the product to transport to the dealers buyers, and markets. The it can allow more time to then purchase all our needed supplies and return to Dinagat Island. Cabunga-an is only a 45 minute ride to the City proper.

 

I can not tell you an accurate amount as to the difference in selling price other than saying the current copra buyer does quite well for themselves; where as the farmer has to burden most of the primary expenses and receives only a low-ball inconsistent price for all their hard work. I personally will not be doing too much more copra in the future, rather I will start producing traditional VCO which can produce far larger profit margins for the amount of labor needed to harvesting and processing of the nuts.   

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Jawny

It would be nice if copra followed the same pattern as other crops such as corn, wheat etc. Unfortunately, the price variations do not seem to lead to much impact on the individual farmer......as to time to harvest and such. The unique nature of harvesting and processing at the level of the farmer makes it a much more personalized decision as to when to harvest.

 

In my area, for example, a lot of farmers use their copra harvest as means to get a "prenda" which is a loan based upon using the copra as collateral. The farmer gets some fixed amount of cash as a loan the the lender gets a share of any copra harvest, typically half. So long as the loan remains unpaid, the share is taken.

 

I've never noticed any particular season for harvesting. Seems to depend upon the individual trees. Even then, not all are harvested at any one time. So, it is a never ending cycle and the value simply fluctuates while the farmer has mouths to feed and debts to pay.

 

As to cooperative efforts, that seems like a great thing if it can be done. Closest to that here is the guy with the large truck. He can make his truck available at some specified time so farmers can work around that time.

 

After the storm, many, many of these older trees were lost and of course the "harvest" was laying on the ground. A lot of effort is going into gathering these now. In some cases, the farmer is exchanging the husks for labor. The worker keeps the husks and makes charcoal or sells the husks.

 

In many instances in the past, the harvest ended up bringing very little profit as the workers had to be paid with the sale money.

 

In my land, the area where so many trees fell, we are planting sweet corn and sweet potatoes. Good cash crop as well as edible as is.

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Portaz

I have a ready made market in oz but probably not at 28 peso per kg

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BossHog

Sold a harvest today.

 

29 pesos a kilo.

 

The price has barely moved since last harvest.

 

Sure lost a lot of the young green coconuts during the January winds and expecting a low yield next go around.

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BossHog

Creeping up.

 

32 here yesterday.

 

Heard talk that it's 40 in Samar.

 

Anyone there?

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Aerosick

In Carcar, Cebu it was 30, now 29...

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spydoo

Do coconut trees, either for VCO or copra, produce a higher return than annual crops?

 

I admit I have thought it lazy to produce perennials; that cropping or at least horticulture would be more productive. In fact I surmised this to be a substantial cause of Filipino poverty. Please correct what I assume is my ignorance.

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BossHog

 

 

expecting a low yield next go around.

 

shows how wrong i can be. got a lot to learn yet.

 

all that rain has more than doubled the yield this harvest. 

 

sold this morning; price steady at 28.50 a kilo.

 

very happy days indeed

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