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BossHog

Current Price for Copra

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BossHog

Copra is a commodity that fluctuates wildly in value.

 

I'm sure more than a few of us harvest the nut to supplement our incomes.

 

It would be interesting to know price per kilo you all get and your location.

 

Let's keep it updated and have some mutual benefit.

 

About 12 pesos a kilo/ Siargao today.

 

Cheers.

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A_Simple_Man

During the last year I have seen the price up to double or triple the amount you mention so: Is it feasible to store it until the price rises?

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TheMatrix

 

About 12 pesos a kilo/ Siargao today.

 

 

that's low. We're getting 22 peso per kilo here in Cebu City.

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BossHog

yes the price is going to be much lower in remote island locations.

 

the copra needs to take a two-hour jeepney ride to the port, then a four-hour boat ride to the regional capital, then a 12-hour boat ride to a larger place like Cebu.

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kulaskusgan
About 12 pesos a kilo/ Siargao today.

 

 

can u give details where i can sell my copra here in cebu, with high price per kilo.. my copra is from mindanao.

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A_Simple_Man

I just sold 2 sacks (73kg) in Biliran province for 30 P per kilo but it was only sun dried. They were offering 37 for fire cooked and there were prices down as low as 24 depending on degree of moisture and quality of product.

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KennyF

Sort of off topic but still to do with coconuts.

When I look at coconut forests or plantations I have often wondered why the ground beneath the trees is not put to use.

On Camiguin where water is almost free, surely you could grow watermellons or pumpkins.

If you could grow just one pumpkin vine between each two trees I would have thought one could pick up a little spare cash. Buternut brings 30 to 40 pesos a kilo in cebu Supermarkers so I should think the farmer could expect 20 pesos per fruit at the farm gate.

 

Just a thought.

 

KinPP

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TheMatrix

Sort of off topic but still to do with coconuts.

When I look at coconut forests or plantations I have often wondered why the ground beneath the trees is not put to use.

On Camiguin where water is almost free, surely you could grow watermellons or pumpkins.

If you could grow just one pumpkin vine between each two trees I would have thought one could pick up a little spare cash. Buternut brings 30 to 40 pesos a kilo in cebu Supermarkers so I should think the farmer could expect 20 pesos per fruit at the farm gate.

 

Just a thought.

 

KinPP

 

Maybe the falling coconuts would smash the watermelons and pumpkins?

 

I once heard that more people die from falling coconuts than drunk driving. Not sure if its true, but interesting to know those falling coconuts mean business!!

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Jess Bartone

Maybe the falling coconuts would smash the watermelons and pumpkins?

 

If a farmer was enterprising enough to plant vegies between his mainstay trees, he would probably harvest the coconuts long before they were ready to fall.

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BossHog

Coco palms throw a lot of shade thus not much sun for growing veggies.

 

We grow peanuts between some trees that are widely spaced.

 

 

Pro tip: when smoking yer copra buy the largest yellowfin tuna you can find and stick it in the rafters of the smoke-house (tapahan) for a few days.

 

Brilliant smoked fish with a great orange color.

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BossHog

(Thanks for unlocking this thread, Paul)

 

 

Am due to harvest copra soon so have been keeping an eye on the price.

 

It had been stuck at 18/kilo for months and that was the price on Friday.

 

Saturday: 20

 

Sunday: 24

 

Monday (today): 29.

 

Trying to decide whether to harvest now or wait and see if it goes up even more.

 

Any thoughts on the spike in price?

 

Lack of copra from the storm regions? 

 

It sometimes tracks the international oil price but I don't follow that commodity.

 

When the price gets this high is when we start to see poachers going after the coconuts.

 

Might have to sit on the porch tonight with a cold one and a shotgun and watch over the plantation.

 

Just kidding. (Kind of).

 

But seriously, keep an eye on your trees if you depend on copra for income.

 

What's the price today where you live?

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USCebuana

I hope they make coco lumber out of those felled coconut trees and rebuild with it. You can use it for walls in interior partitions and ceiling joists for a simple home. Sometimes they even use it for roof trusses and roof joists. It will probably be a lot better than some of the homes they have now. 

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Denis

For what it's worth you can track historical price trends from last 6 months to last 30 years here...  http://www.indexmundi.com/commodities/?commodity=copra

 

Plus if you can find out which Commodities Futures Market/s list the contracts you should get some idea of trending prices...

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Knowdafish
Any thoughts on the spike in price?   Lack of copra from the storm regions? 

 

That would be my 1st guess as supply and demand are the two things that usually affect prices the most. 

 

The storms not only took out some of the supply, but also some of the suppliers. I doubt that prices will go down for many months to come. Coconut Palms take a few years to start producing, and I think that replanting is the last thing on most survivors minds. 

Edited by Knowdafish

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BossHog
That would be my 1st guess as supply and demand are the two things that usually affect prices the most.

 

Upon further research: the international commodity price on the site quoted above is for Philippines/Indonesia copra by the metric ton delivered to NW Europe. So maybe there are other factors in play besides the storm.

 

India is having a big spike in copra and coconut oil prices this week, too.

 

Usually there are two consecutive "off-harvests". I forget the Visayan word for it. We've just gone through the second and the next harvest ought to be a big one but with lower prices. This off-harvest covers the whole country I think but not sure if it extends all the way to India.

 

Went to the port today and sold my copra. Just a hair under 1,500 kilograms. Got 27 a kilo which isn't bad but nowhere close to when the price spiked to 50 about two and a half years ago.

 

Still, I'm not complaining and it was a very good earn and I'd be moaning if I'd harvested last week.

 

Talked to the Chinaman who I sold to and he expects some weakness in the local price over the next few weeks. But it's all guess work.

 

I searched but am unable to find a site that gives the daily international spot price. Anyone want to have a look. I believe the symbol is CPS.

 

The European price seems to be just under 700 USD a metric ton now. Since I'm getting 27 pesos (.615 USD) in the back-end of nowhere I'm surprised the ton price isn't higher.

 

We need a commodity guru to sort this out for us. Any financial trader types here on LinC?

Edited by BossHog
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