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Bill H

An unconventional Pump Boat build....

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Bill H

So I got bored and it turns out I needed another pump boat to service some static traps for my fishing business and also to set and retrieve fish and crab pots. I needed a boat that was both strong and light, could navigate in the shallow waters of the bay where my static traps are located, but also sturdy and large enough to handle open waters where we will set our fish traps and pots. I looked at the local boats for sale, but nothing really matched all the above criteria, so I decided to build my own with a bit of a twist. The traditional pump boats in this area start life as a log, usually from a Karot tree, but sometimes a mahogany tree. The log is cut into a very thick plank which is somewhat hollowed out and forms the keel of the boat. Solid wood keels are both heavy and very susceptible to marine borers, so in a short time they begin to look like swiss cheese. My idea was to substitute plywood for the hollowed out log since the borers are not quite so fond of chewing glue and plywood is much stronger and lighter than the solid wood of a hollowed out tree trunk.

 

To achieve the thickness I wanted in the bottom (keel) of the boat, I decided to laminate thin sections of plywood together using epoxy glue until I had the 1 1/8" thickness I wanted. I used 3/8" marine plywood for this task and since the keel would be 16' long, I overlapped the three layers so no one joint ran clear through the keel. The first picture is one of my guys applying epoxy to laminate the plywood. The second is the resulting thick plywood plank which measures 16" wide and 16' long. The locals all told me you can't build a boat like this, as it won't be strong. Even my crew had some serious doubts, but I pressed ahead anyway.

 

In the next post I'll show you how it's coming along.

 

Regards,

 

Bill

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post-8579-0-87910900-1325483236_thumb.jpg

Edited by Bill H
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fanboat

Lots of pics Bill!

this is going to be a great thread

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Stranded Shipscook

You are on the right path, buddy. My 33' sailyacht ( Catamaran) was build in that manner, and that was in Germany by a professional boat builder, i assume they know what they are doing.

 

Good infos are also under millions of links, mostly title with GRP Boat buildling or West System and others.

 

such as this one :

 

http://www.boatbuild...6/03/14/1429203

 

or that one

 

http://wharram.com/site/

Edited by G....

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smokey

use only the best glue... i forget what they call it but i watched a guy build a boat using plank and then a cotton stuffed into the cracks and then when the boat is in water the cotton grows and seals the boat ... i also watched a 65 foot hull made out of cement... and a fiberglass drag boat each was a this wont work and they did

Edited by smokey

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Davaoeno
use only the best glue...

 

 

now is not the time to be patriotic and buy glue that says " made in the Philippines " :as-if:

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smokey

now is not the time to be patriotic and buy glue that says " made in the Philippines " :as-if:

 

 

 

i have painted a few big boats and best glue and best paint would of been bad for my business. once i tried to develop a paint to use on the bottom that would stop the long green hair growth that slows down the boat... that is where i learned polyurthane and water are not friends,,

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Bill H

Actually, I'm using Pioneer Laminating Epoxy #7 but I'm not all that fond of it. For one it sets up a little too quickly for my taste, but it's strong and does the job. I've got some #5 on order and if they ever get it to me we'll give it a try to see if it works any better. Both of these epoxies are West System look alikes with a Filipino bent!

 

Stuffing cotton (traditionally oakum) into seams goes back about as long as boat were made up of planks. This boat however is mostly plywood around a solid wood frame, so there are no seams to caulk.

 

I'm not much of a fiberglass fan. Fiberglass smells bad, fiberglass dust makes you itch really, really bad when you're sanding it, contrary to common belief fiberglass is not water proof. In fact, the only reason most boats are built of fiberglass is because it's the material that lends itself best to mass production! Did I say I loathe fiberglass? Yeah and I don't like it either! LOL

 

I've been knocking around boats my entire life. I'm actually a steel boat guy, but my crew is skeptical enough just doing what we're doing, so I'm easing them into the best material for boat building slowly and incrementally. ;-)

 

Regards,

 

Bill

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Stranded Shipscook

Actually, I'm using Pioneer Laminating Epoxy #7 but I'm not all that fond of it. For one it sets up a little too quickly for my taste, but it's strong and does the job. I've got some #5 on order and if they ever get it to me we'll give it a try to see if it works any better. Both of these epoxies are West System look alikes with a Filipino bent!

 

Stuffing cotton (traditionally oakum) into seams goes back about as long as boat were made up of planks. This boat however is mostly plywood around a solid wood frame, so there are no seams to caulk.

 

I'm not much of a fiberglass fan. Fiberglass smells bad, fiberglass dust makes you itch really, really bad when you're sanding it, contrary to common belief fiberglass is not water proof. In fact, the only reason most boats are built of fiberglass is because it's the material that lends itself best to mass production! Did I say I loathe fiberglass? Yeah and I don't like it either! LOL

 

I've been knocking around boats my entire life. I'm actually a steel boat guy, but my crew is skeptical enough just doing what we're doing, so I'm easing them into the best material for boat building slowly and incrementally. ;-)

 

Regards,

 

Bill

Pioneer is good stuff, same as any other epoxy actually. the mistakes are mainly made in non-observance of mixtures and curing times. Time is absolutely crucial in working with Epoxy resins.

 

Specially when its hot. That is your problem right now. Some guys try to extend the time by thinning it down, or change the compound mixture, but one needs a lot of experience in doing it.

 

Working fast and with smaller quantities at one time is better.

Edited by G....

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Bill H

All true G, but my scale is a tad too big, so I have a problem mixing too small a quantity. I'm going to find a smaller scale next time I go to town, which will allow me to mix up smaller batches accurately.

 

Regards,

 

Bill

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trthebees

Polymer products in Mandaue also do laminating epoxy, and some disc rollers etc. They also do 200g/m cloth, which is quite decent for external sheathing or taping etc.

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