Jump to content

Britian Says no to EU Plan


Recommended Posts

Stranded Shipscook

Or you could try out some facts. Russia, France and Germany are the top 3 for arming the muslims.

Germany doesn't produce much stuff they could use. We have a mainly defense orientated weapons productions.

 

And i haven't seen many G3 rifles around the world. Or Leopard Tanks. Except one would refer to Israel,Saudi Arabia and South Africa as terrorist nations.

Edited by G....
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 298
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Stranded Shipscook

    75

  • Markham

    53

  • UZI

    40

  • Alan S

    17

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Behind all this, there is STILL the "banking crisis".   The European banks (excluding the UK ones) need to raise collateral of between 3.5 and 5 TRILLION (Euros) just to stay solvent, and that is a

As a Brit I am watching what has happened over the last days with concern, and reading the comments here with some amusement. Someone likened the British attitude to a potential passenger of the Titan

You mean give up sovereignty to a country with 50 different sets of laws, with 2 main parties that are usually diametrically opposed on most issues and is in huge debt without a clear strategy for pay

Posted Images

Julian C Thong

A nice summary of the EU commission:-

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Stranded Shipscook

That's the pivotal point. Germany won't agree to the structural changes necessary to allow the ECB to print money and be the lender of last resort precisely because of the failure of the Weimar Republic which is deeply rooted in its national psyche. It would much rather the IMF be the ultimate lender and guarantor but why should non-Eurozone IMF contributors pay for Eurozone profligacy? Things might be different had Germany and France not been the first countries to breach the Stability Pact that was agreed and put in place at the time the Eurozone was established. Not exactly setting a good example.

 

 

 

 

That's the view of many economists who say it's no longer a matter of "if" but "when". As this crisis deepens, the Euro will fall in value against both Sterling and the US Dollar - Guenther says it's over-valued and he may be right - but a steady drop in value will only add to the Eurozone's woes as it becomes more difficult and more expensive to borrow.

 

 

 

 

Of the countries that are currently outside the Eurozone, only two retain their national vetoes, Denmark and the UK. Since the new treaty will replace national vetoes with qualified majority voting, its unlikely that Denmark could sign-up for it since it would lose its jealously-guarded vetoes and Britain's position is quite clear on that - vetoes stay. The other eight non-EZ countries might be arm-twisted into joining the EZ, they're all recent entrants to the EU and have no vetoes to lose. That'll leave ourselves and the Danes outside and with little cause or benefit from remaining as EU members. This all assumes the Euro lasts that long, of course, member nations have up to the end of March to sign-up but Greece and Italy could tumble before then.

 

the Danish Krone is pegged to the Euro. Whatever happens to the Euro happens to the Krone as well. Just for info. ERM2.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a very interesting commentary on some of the political implications for the Left in Europe of what has been going on.......

 

 

"The consequences of this Rhenish Right ascendancy in EU institutions – not the same as Anglo-Saxon or Burkean “small platoon” conservatism, by the way – was in evidence at the Merkozy summit in Brussels. As the BBC’s Paul Mason put it, the deal has “outlawed expansionary fiscal policy” by enshrining near-zero structural deficits in international law, with constitutional debt brakes, mandatory sanctions and budget commissars for delinquent nations.

The 26 states that went along with this Merkel plan have given up the right to pursue counter-cyclical Keynesian stimulus, and have agreed to do so in perpetuity since it is almost impossible to repeal EU “Acquis”.

Personally, I am not a Keynesian – nor are many Daily Telegraph readers – but this strikes me as a mad commitment to make. For the Left it is surely an unmitigated disaster. They cannot pursue their economic agenda ever again. Fabians feared long ago that such an outcome was built into EMU. They called the euro a “bankers’ ramp”, but somehow their warnings were drowned out in the mass hysteria of monetary union."

 

For more, see:

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/comment/ambroseevans_pritchard/8964183/Workers-of-Europe-unite-youve-only-euro-chains-to-lose.html

Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian C Thong

Interesting, because the company I worked for in Europe most definitely allowed this. I have used it. Indeed when I came to live in The Philippines I cashed in some days, and banked others. I was so intrigued i took the time to read the directive:

 

Member States shall take measures to ensure that workers enjoy:

  • the minimum daily rest period of 11 consecutive hours per period of 24 hours;
  • the minimum period of one rest day on average immediately following the daily rest period in every seven-day period;
  • for a daily period of work of more than six hours, a break as defined by the provisions of collective agreements, agreements concluded between social partners or national legislation;
  • not less than four weeks' annual paid holiday, qualification for which shall be determined by reference to national practice/legislation;
  • an average weekly working period of not more than 48 hours, including the overtime for each seven-day period.

it doesnt contain a reference t the point you made. Now you you may call me a socialist (even though Im a former office bearer in the Conservative party) but I consider those rules to be pretty fair.

 

Why do Little Englanders want to "opt in" to allow near slavery? I just dont understand. Its the same illogical thought that makes them hate De Gaulle for vetoing British entry but who also want Britain out. De Gaulle should be their hero, not their villain.

 

I'm afraid the law did change about carrying over holidays, mind you it may have been UK legislation. I forget the detail but they had to be spent or waived withing a month or so of the new year. I believe you could take the money in lieu.

Edited by TommyStubbing
Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian C Thong

the Danish Krone is pegged to the Euro. Whatever happens to the Euro happens to the Krone as well. Just for info. ERM2.

 

But could be unpegged at the swipe of a pen.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Stranded Shipscook

I think i am safe to say, that all politicians and their associated newspapers ( that's for Pro and contra EU ) use a lot of "blame EU" in their statements.

 

As it can be expected that no regular person ever reads the associated regulations or laws. So its pretty easy and safe to just blame it on the others.

As Sperry so nicely demonstrated with the "Working rule" excerpts..

 

In the times of google this isn't much of a problem i guess.

 

I also do not find it fair, that people use the same tactics as Politicians. They should fully read and understand first before they are quoting from those sources and rules and not expecting others to do for them in the hope that the "argument" goes through. (Which it mostly does in my case, as i don't google, i believe when people quote a directive or law and take it for granted that it expresses the opinion or point the poster makes.)

:as-if:

Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian C Thong

Ambrose on the changes and how the left should start to fight back:-

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/comment/ambroseevans_pritchard/8964183/Workers-of-Europe-unite-youve-only-euro-chains-to-lose.html

 

The end peice:-

 

The question for today’s Left is whether it is in their interests to keep apologising for an EU monetary regime that has pushed the jobless rate for youth to 49pc in Spain, 45pc in Greece, 30pc in Portugal and Ireland, 29pc in Italy and 24pc in France – yet 8.9pc in undervalued Germany – and that offers no credible way out of the slump for the Southern half.

 

Mark my words, this will not go away. The only hope is that war does not errupt in 5 years or so.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Stranded Shipscook

 

 

Mark my words, this will not go away. The only hope is that war does not errupt in 5 years or so.

What war ? Civil unrest you mean ?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Germany doesn't produce much stuff they could use. We have a mainly defense orientated weapons productions.

 

And i haven't seen many G3 rifles around the world. Or Leopard Tanks. Except one would refer to Israel,Saudi Arabia and South Africa as terrorist nations.

You are correct, I was recalling from a article I read a few years back. The high german number was related to all the bunkers and other construction not strictly arms.

France, Russia and China have been the largest arms suppliers to Iraq since 1972. Russia has been the biggest supplier of arms at 57% followed by France with 13%, China with 12%, Czechoslovakia with 7%, Poland with 4%, Brazil with 2%, Egypt with 1%, Romania with 1%, Denmark with 1%, Libya with 1% and the USA with 1%

Link to post
Share on other sites

What war ? Civil unrest you mean ?

 

It could be ether or both. There has already been a ongoing war on freedom and the individual by most governments in the west. As the EU shatters what old hostilities will arise and become large conflicts? Just look at Kosavo/serbia, it was in the back yard of the EU yet they all stood with their hands in their pockets whistling and waiting for the US to come handle it.

 

Looking around the world it is a challenge to find the areas where prosperity and peace are flourishing. Brazil and a few others are bright spots.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You are correct, I was recalling from a article I read a few years back. The high german number was related to all the bunkers and other construction not strictly arms.

France, Russia and China have been the largest arms suppliers to Iraq since 1972. Russia has been the biggest supplier of arms at 57% followed by France with 13%, China with 12%, Czechoslovakia with 7%, Poland with 4%, Brazil with 2%, Egypt with 1%, Romania with 1%, Denmark with 1%, Libya with 1% and the USA with 1%

 

Pleased to see the British fail at this one.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Experienced

And i haven't seen many G3 rifles around the world.

 

Maybe you just needed to get a little farther from your boat... they're only used in about, oh, forty countries. ;-)

Link to post
Share on other sites
Stranded Shipscook

Maybe you just needed to get a little farther from your boat... they're only used in about, oh, forty countries. ;-)

wow, i didn't knew that. But i guess, mostly by law enforcement or other special forces and not as broad standard rifle for their Armies. (would be too expensive anyhow and i think its a quite sensitive weapon really not suitable for the, well, "not so trained" soldier)

And then so many now manufacture them.

 

As i said, i didn't see them and i been around a lot. Mostly its either M14/16 or AK's.

Edited by G....
Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..

Capture.JPG

I Understand...