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The Vietnam War experience


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Davaoeno

Let me share the OP with you

 

 

It's not just you, but i hope this thread takes up company with Hatred Speech is not Free Speech, Filipino Men do not deserve Filipina's and I'm 66 & Tired too

 

Its interesting that you should mention that thread, because I started it, and now it has disappeared, as well as any reference to it in my profile ie topics started, posts, content etc. its as though it never existed.

 

Now if you are suggesting that my own thread was moved to a forum that I do not have access to ie the DK- then that is a pretty blatant example of censorship !!

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Here's a Vietnam war experience. My wife is Chinese Vietnamese. When the US pulled out she was 14, a freshman in high school. When the Viet Cong took the city, Saigon shut down for two weeks. After

Steve, I really hope you don't actually buy any of that bullshit they were spouting at the museum in Hanoi. If you do, then you dishonor those who served and died there.

That was a hard time and not many speak of it.. Hard to be there hard to come home too.

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Alan S

I am trying NOT to close this thread, but some contributions are moving it towards closure.

 

I suggest you stick to the topic, not attack other members, and keep things civilised, or it WILL be closed.

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tobster

Sorry I could not complete the post as I original intended as my wifes sister went into labour as I was making the post...............

 

Anyway my post was promted by the death of a vietnamese friend.

 

HIS FAMILY OWNED A FRENCH CAFE ABOUT A HALF A MILE FROM THE AMERICAN EMBASSY DURING THE WAR.

 

DURING THE TET OFFENSIVE HIS PLACE BECAME A STRONGHOLD AND HE PERSONALLY SAVED THE LIVES OF A DOZEN OR SO US PERSONAL AS HE TOOK OUT VC WITH HIS WEAPON AND HIS NURSE WIFES EFFORTS..........

 

DURING THE NVA PUSH IN 1972, HE AND HIS WIFE ESCAPED INTO THAILAND AND RODE A SINKING BOAT TO AUSTRALIA.........

 

THEY SET UP A FRENCH CAFE IN SYDNEY AND WORKED HARD TO MAKE IT A SUCCESS....

 

JUST BEFORE I CAME HERE HE TOLD ME THE STORY OF HIS LIFE, AND ON HIS PASSING I FELT THAT SOMEONE SHOULD MENTION HIS STORY AND SACRIFICE...

 

THE MAN ASK FOR NOTHING AND SAVED THE LIVES OF MANY US PERSNEL AND DID SO COS HE CARED............

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smokey

 

Sorry, but I have been to Cuba and no one forced me to be a communist nor did they torture me !

 

And as far as I know there are no communist countries in the middle east.

 

Sorry but I will have to give you a 0 out of 2 !! :stick_poke:

 

 

 

 

dang i messed up again... should of finished high school before starting on my two main hobbies ... making money and getting married .. this is my 4 try and so far so good...

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For Real

Sorry I could not complete the post as I original intended as my wifes sister went into labour as I was making the post...............

 

Anyway my post was promted by the death of a vietnamese friend.

 

HIS FAMILY OWNED A FRENCH CAFE ABOUT A HALF A MILE FROM THE AMERICAN EMBASSY DURING THE WAR.

 

DURING THE TET OFFENSIVE HIS PLACE BECAME A STRONGHOLD AND HE PERSONALLY SAVED THE LIVES OF A DOZEN OR SO US PERSONAL AS HE TOOK OUT VC WITH HIS WEAPON AND HIS NURSE WIFES EFFORTS..........

 

DURING THE NVA PUSH IN 1972, HE AND HIS WIFE ESCAPED INTO THAILAND AND RODE A SINKING BOAT TO AUSTRALIA.........

 

THEY SET UP A FRENCH CAFE IN SYDNEY AND WORKED HARD TO MAKE IT A SUCCESS....

 

JUST BEFORE I CAME HERE HE TOLD ME THE STORY OF HIS LIFE, AND ON HIS PASSING I FELT THAT SOMEONE SHOULD MENTION HIS STORY AND SACRIFICE...

 

THE MAN ASK FOR NOTHING AND SAVED THE LIVES OF MANY US PERSNEL AND DID SO COS HE CARED............

The man is a hero, your lucky to have a friend like this...and congrats Tito Tobster

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This thread is very painful to me....Having served in Vietnam and in the Navy from 1963-1970....I was never a "victim" of my Government!!!! I volunteered for duty in 'Nam and I'm damn proud of my service( I was only "in country" for 7 months) ...

 

There's no reason you shouldn't be proud of your service. I disagree that you weren't a victim (even if you don't feel like one) though. For some, they lost their lives. Others lost their sanity. The rest had to listen to abuse and condemnation of them and people like them. Unless you were a decisionmaker who guided the US into that conflict, you were not in control of it, hence you were a victim of its results.

 

 

and I remain proud of my Country despite the Jane Fondas, The Ted Kennedys, the Clintons and the cowardly bastards that ran off with their tail between their legs to Canada. The only real effect the war had on me was a short period of "Survivor's Guilt"...

 

Draft dodger is one of the nastiest insults among the military, and I understand and respect why they feel as they do.

 

In certain cases I completely agree:

 

During the Civil War, if a Southerner ran to Mexico instead of standing with his neighbors and fighting for his home, I'd agree he's worthy of scorn.

 

The World Wars were such sweeping conflicts that one could reasonably argue that entering those conflicts was in any American's interest because they were sure to spread to the US and endanger their homes and loved ones (and in WWII, already had).

 

While I'm sure there were draft dodgers in all of those wars, there weren't enough that you hear about them and I'd agree with you in your characterization of them.

 

Viet Nam and Korea were different.

 

Those were both conflicts where there wasn't an immediate foreseeable threat to the US, regardless of which side came out on top. In other words, from the perspective of the US Government, they were arguably voluntary wars. Personally, I hesitate to automatically classify someone who refused to be conscripted into a voluntary war a coward.

 

Anyway, your personal motives and service are admirable. I salute you and everyone who fought (voluntarily or enslaved by their country). In spite of that, I can (and do) feel that the very fact that our country was involved and many of our citizens forced to participate was a betrayal by the government.

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The Vietnam War Experience, where did you go? I vote to shut it down! 68 plus posts and less then half actually deal with the topic, half of those are hearsay or relayed from someone else's experiences. I really do not think that the original poster had this in mind.

 

Only about one in seven soldiers that served in that theater actually saw and or engaged the enemy in a life and death struggle. There was a big difference between the tour of duty of a logistical soldier and a combat MOS soldier. Maybe you should take a poll and see how many posters are actually a Vietnam Combat Veteran. Chances are if thats what the original poster had in mind he may not get much feedback anyway. Their kinda of funny like that, they may talk to each other about their experiences, but talking to someone in detail that has not been there done that is a rare occurrence. Whats the point? They could not really understand anyway.

 

I've been asked about my participation by many people over the years. Now and then I've wanted to open up a little, but they would manage to piss me off within the first few minutes. They set there, start fidgeting and I can see it in there face, here it comes. "Did you ever kill anyone, how did it feel"? Now I ask you, what kind of fuc-ing question is that? End of conversation! One time I actually had a long conversation with a non-veteran. He was truly curious, interested and was not judgmental. He never asked that question. At the end of our conservation I shook his and thanked him. He had a puzzled look on his face and clasped my hand with both of his and said, "Why thank me?, its you that deserves the thanks." I smiled and told him I appreciated him not asking the question everyone else always had. He just replied, "Thats between you and God." smiled and walked away.

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Easyrider

The Vietnam War Experience, where did you go? I vote to shut it down! 68 plus posts and less then half actually deal with the topic, half of those are hearsay or relayed from someone else's experiences. I really do not think that the original poster had this in mind.

 

Only about one in seven soldiers that served in that theater actually saw and or engaged the enemy in a life and death struggle. There was a big difference between the tour of duty of a logistical soldier and a combat MOS soldier. Maybe you should take a poll and see how many posters are actually a Vietnam Combat Veteran. Chances are if thats what the original poster had in mind he may not get much feedback anyway. Their kinda of funny like that, they may talk to each other about their experiences, but talking to someone in detail that has not been there done that is a rare occurrence. Whats the point? They could not really understand anyway.

 

I've been asked about my participation by many people over the years. Now and then I've wanted to open up a little, but they would manage to piss me off within the first few minutes. They set there, start fidgeting and I can see it in there face, here it comes. "Did you ever kill anyone, how did it feel"? Now I ask you, what kind of fuc-ing question is that? End of conversation! One time I actually had a long conversation with a non-veteran. He was truly curious, interested and was not judgmental. He never asked that question. At the end of our conservation I shook his and thanked him. He had a puzzled look on his face and clasped my hand with both of his and said, "Why thank me?, its you that deserves the thanks." I smiled and told him I appreciated him not asking the question everyone else always had. He just replied, "Thats between you and God." smiled and walked away.

 

I believe a lot of people don't really want to hear what it was like serving in Vietnam, they are just waiting to ask if you killed someone. I always hated that question too and is one reason I try to avoid the subject of Vietnam.

 

No one can understand what it was like unless they were there. It was like being in hell to me. The enemy wasn't able to kill me but I almost killed myself. My plan was to make my own men think I was the enemy coming through our perimeter at night so they would shoot me. I even chose the area where it would happen but before I carried it out, a Vietnamese girl made friends with me and would talk to me most days, which helped me come out of my deep depression. One guy in my company couldn't take it anymore and put his 45 to his head. Others in my company did too but I didn't know them. I don't know what their families were told. We were just young kids.

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I was in Ankhe, Vietnam in 1967-1968. I was right below Hon cong mountain in the 13th signal battalion, 1st Cavalry Div. I didn't see a whole lot of action, but enough. It was not a fun year, and I lost a great many friends. I don't know of anyone who wants to talk about what they saw or what they did. I did not agree with the war, but I would do it again if my country needed me. I only wish we would have stayed to finish what was started. Many human beings lost there lives for what they thought was the right thing to do. Talking about it will not prevent it from happening again and again. I have no animosity for the Vietnimize people. I made some good friends while I was there also. I wish I could find some of the girls I met, and I have tried with no success. So I wish you good luck in finding someone who wants to bragg on there exploits.

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HeyMike

Easyrider, I for one am glad you met that Vietnamese girl... good having you with us here.

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Spent one year in Saigon as an MP. Can't say that it was a bad experience. Probably would not be in the Philippines today if not for Nam. Later, SB

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sandwindstars

 

I believe a lot of people don't really want to hear what it was like serving in Vietnam, they are just waiting to ask if you killed someone. I always hated that question too and is one reason I try to avoid the subject of Vietnam.

 

No one can understand what it was like unless they were there. It was like being in hell to me. The enemy wasn't able to kill me but I almost killed myself. My plan was to make my own men think I was the enemy coming through our perimeter at night so they would shoot me. I even chose the area where it would happen but before I carried it out, a Vietnamese girl made friends with me and would talk to me most days, which helped me come out of my deep depression. One guy in my company couldn't take it anymore and put his 45 to his head. Others in my company did too but I didn't know them. I don't know what their families were told. We were just young kids.

 

After all these years, I believe it is still a very sensitive topic. I'm not American but have been exposed to it some not only through the news. I wondered then if I had been an 18 year old and drafted in that hell hole, what I would have done. Politics aside, I have to admire those who got through and managed to live a productive life after that. The most memorable scene for me to do with that time was at Clark Air base. A few days before Christmas (I was 13 I think), and we were there to listen to a Christmas concert, Handel's Messiah. Just before the concert started, they wheeled out the injured from the base hospital to the front. From time to time, they would wheel some of them back out. (Handel was like 3 hours). There was something really sad about that.

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Steve, I really hope you don't actually buy any of that bullshit they were spouting at the museum in Hanoi. If you do, then you dishonor those who served and died there.

 

What do you mean by this comment? Are you saying that every statement made there is 100% false?

 

And I think you should step back and perform a bit more analysis.

 

Let's take an example from WW2,

 

The commonwealth aircrew in RAF Bomber Command showed enormous courage and bravery. Many (and certainly most at the height of the conflict) died.

 

However that does not change the fact that the Area Bombing Air Offensive was almost certainly a war crime.

 

I and many others have no problem with these two facts. You can salute someone's courage whilst acknowledging and accepting he was in fact being manipulated by politicians, on whom history will not be kind.

 

To adopt your attitude of "you're for us or against us" precludes objective debate

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