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Languages---Which One is More Useful, Tagalog or Visayan?

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Davaoeno

Oh dear Ian...you really should have quit while you were ahead. :fighting0029:

.

 

on further study i think you may be correct !!! [ however, that doesnt give you the right to call me dear- not unless you are willing for this relationship to go to the next step !! :evan_iliadis: I'm just so tired of having my emotions trifled with !! i am NOT easy !!! [ cheap-yes !!] ]

So many people here are unwilling to take a chance and use some english. Even when i joke with them and try to make them feel as comfortable as possible. They just want to hide away and tell me they have a nosebleed ! lol Both my maid and my yaya have been with us for almost a year- and both feel very comfortable with my wife and me- but I'll be damned if i can get them to speak anything at all in english [ even tho both of them now understand quite a bit ]

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Mang Kanor

^True, most Filipinos aren't comfortable speaking English as people tend to laugh at every mistakes they commit.

The society has a mentality on mocking people who speaks english which he/she is not good enough (carabao english), thats why filipino tend to shy away on speaking english in public places to avoid being a laughing stock... this is also applicable to tagalog language, speak tagalog with a stiff tongue on a cebuano society and you'll be beaten into pieces...

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Headshot

 

that doesnt give you the right to call me dear- not unless you are willing for this relationship to go to the next step !! :fighting0029: I'm just so tired of having my emotions trifled with !! i am NOT easy !!! [ cheap-yes !!] ]

Just chalk it up to a difference between the American and Canadian dialects... :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:

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Woolf

Some words and phrases and their respective definitions or uses are peculiar to Philippine English.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippine_English see down the page

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Athena

 

on further study i think you may be correct !!! [ however, that doesnt give you the right to call me dear- not unless you are willing for this relationship to go to the next step !! :evan_iliadis: I'm just so tired of having my emotions trifled with !! i am NOT easy !!! [ cheap-yes !!] ]

So many people here are unwilling to take a chance and use some english. Even when i joke with them and try to make them feel as comfortable as possible. They just want to hide away and tell me they have a nosebleed ! lol Both my maid and my yaya have been with us for almost a year- and both feel very comfortable with my wife and me- but I'll be damned if i can get them to speak anything at all in english [ even tho both of them now understand quite a bit ]

 

 

Cheap ???????????????????? nah .............. Not Davao 007, surely?????????????

 

headshot is asking if you will settle for "darlin" or "sweetie pie" ............

 

 

:scratch_head::biggrin_01::rolleyes:

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ArieBombarie

^True, most Filipinos aren't comfortable speaking English as people tend to laugh at every mistakes they commit.

The society has a mentality on mocking people who speaks english which he/she is not good enough (carabao english), thats why filipino tend to shy away on speaking english in public places to avoid being a laughing stock... this is also applicable to tagalog language, speak tagalog with a stiff tongue on a cebuano society and you'll be beaten into pieces...

also true and even at home is considered public, private is when they are on the toilet

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Easyrider

Oh dear Ian...you really should have quit while you were ahead. :scratch_head:

 

Athena was talking about elementary through university...most classes are taught in English. The difference in university is that NO classes are taught in Filipino (or Pilipino)...unless the student is studying to become a teacher. Then they continue to have Filipino classes in university. In elementary through high school, the ONLY classes taught in Filipino are the Filipino language classes and the social studies classes. However, OUTSIDE the classroom (and even inside the classroom in most schools) the language of conversations is the local language. SHS Ateneo de Cebu is one of those schools that fine students for using Cebuano on-campus...to reinforce the use of English, Filipino and Mandarin (the third required language at that school).

 

As for why many children of school age don't seem capable of conversing in English, my guess is that they just aren't comfortable in a language they haven't really mastered (remembering that most students do NOT converse in English...even in school). It is much different listening to a language in class than it is trying to speak it without making mistakes. My wife estimates that about 30% of the population NEVER becomes comfortable enough to converse in English...about the same percentage that can't tell time on a clock with hands. Maybe some people live in neighborhoods where the rate is much higher.

 

Headshot,

 

You seem to always know what you are talking about when it comes to school in the Philippines. I guess that is because your wife was a school teacher. I often wonder where some people get there information about the schools in the Philippines when they make a statement like, English is not used or taught in schools. As you said, most classes are taught in English and most books are in English.

 

By the way, most statements I make concerning school come from speaking to high school graduates, a school teacher on my street, and from 2 students living on the 1st floor below me. I don't use my imagination as it seems some do.

 

I don't know which one is correct Pilipino or Filipino, maybe it doesn't really matter anyway, but today I received my first new 20 pesos bill. On the bottom left corner in small print it says, FILIPINO AS THE NATIONAL LANGUAGE 1935

Edited by Easyrider

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Athena

Some words and phrases and their respective definitions or uses are peculiar to Philippine English.

 

http://en.wikipedia....lippine_English see down the page

 

 

 

You might find that wiki article is slightly misleading ……………..

 

Those words and phrases might be widely used in the everyday usage because they are either have no Pilipino translation or is a foreign derivatives but what wiki did not explain was that most Filipinos’ knows they are not the correct english words/usage but bastardised english (taglish) which most Filipinos are fun of doing. Kind of filipino mentality thing, same as having double names eg. Lenlen, Kiki, Denden, Lotlot, etc…………

 

In the serious articles and the academia that is not acceptable or tolerated!

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Paul
My wife jumped all over me for criticizing the English spoken here. She said, "You have your English, and we have our English. Just because there are differences doesn't make one right and the other wrong." She's right, of course. There are MANY dialects of English...and many are barely intelligible to other English speakers.

 

I have stated the following on this site, many times in the past.

 

Often, when we (westerners) converse with Filipinos, we think they are making mistakes in English when they speak to us. For example, when a Filipino is talking about a particular person in your family, they may confuse (according to us anyway) he and she. You may talking about your cousin John, but when when your wife replies, she may say, "Yes, she is going to the store."

 

You are left scratching your head thinking, "Is my wife still talking about my cousin John, or someone else?" For her, she is correct because there is one word in Cebuano for he, she, and it. That word is "siya", pronounced "see-ya", or "s'ya", pronounced "sha", short a sound. So, for her, she has not made an error, having only translated as closely as she could during that conversation.

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Athena

I don't know which one is correct Pilipino or Filipino, maybe it doesn't really matter anyway, but today I received my first new 20 pesos bill. On the bottom left corner in small print it says, FILIPINO AS THE NATIONAL LANGUAGE 1935

 

 

 

Oh well, that’s PI for you …………. They are not exactly reknown for being meticulous, witness the problems on birth certificates. Yeah, you would have thought something as official as that they would pay particular attention ……………….

 

But for your edification, perhaps this might help you to understand ……………

 

 

The emergence of a national language that could unite the whole country is the realization of a dream that goes back to the year 1935. President Manuel L. Quezon of the Commonwealth of the Philippines made this possible through the inclusion of an article in the 1935 Constitution of the Philippines regarding the development of a national language.

 

Of the more than a hundred languages being spoken by the different ethnolinguistic groups of dwellers in the more than seven thousand and one hundred islands comprising the Philippines, eight of them are considered major languages. These major languages are Ilocano, Pangasinan, Pampango, Tagalog, Bicol, Cebuano, Hiligaynon and Waray-Samarnon.

 

The 1935 Constitution Article XIV, Section 3 states that "...Congress shall make necessary steps towards the development of a national language which will be based on one of the existing native languages..." There are two significant words in the statement, namely existing and native. The initial step made by the national Assembly was the passing of Commonwealth Act No. 184 (1936) that created a national committee and empowered its members to decide on which one of the existing native major languages will the national language be based. The committee members were eminent linguists and each one of them representing a linguistic group or one of the major languages. They were Jaime C. de Veyra (Hiligaynon), Santiago Fonacier (Ilocano), Casimiro Perfecto (Bicol), Felix Salas Rodriguez (Samarnon), Felimon Sotto (Cebuano), Cecilio Lopez (Tagalog), and Hadji Butu (Maranao-Maguindanao). Mr. Jaime de Veyra was the chairman of the said committee. A year later, four more committee members were included. They were Isidro Abad (Cebuano), Zoilo Hilario (Pampango), Jose Zulueta (Pangasinan) and Lope K. Santos (Tagalog).

 

After a thorough and earnest effort in studying the case, the committee recommended Tagalog to be the basis of the national language. Hence, the Executive Order No. 134 s. 1937 stating that the national language will be based on Tagalog. Three years after the proclamation of Tagalog as the basis of the national language (officially called "Pilipino" since 1959) it was decided as one of the official languages of the Philippines. It was taught as a subject in the teacher education courses and in the elementary and secondary schools throughout the country. Lope K. Santos who was then appointed director of the Institute of National Language (1939), undertook the preparation of grammar book (Balarila ng Wikang Pambansa) which constitute the bulk of what was taught in school.

 

The Tagalog-based national language was taught in school only as one of the subject areas (1940) but was not adapted as the medium of instruction. During World War II, the Japanese encouraged the use of the National Language rather than English in the schools. The Tagalog-based national language was, therefore, propagated not only in education but also in mass media and in official communication. The census for 1948 reported that 7,126,913 people or 37.11% of the population spoke the language, representing an increase of 11.7% from the 1939 figure of 4,068,565. Of these seven million people, 47.7% learned it as a second language (Liamzon).

 

Once again, the National Language issue sparked heated discussion during the 1973 Constitutional Convention. A committee on National Language (CNL) was created by the convention delegates to look into the language question and to make recommendations on the policy that should be adapted on the matter. The CNL, after hearing conflicting testimonies from various language experts in the country, recommended to eliminate Pilipino and replace it with a new "common national language to be known as Filipino, based on existing native languages...". The FILIPINO to be developed pursuant to the 1973 constitution could be a fusion of the different native languages. This CNL recommendation met a great deal of oppositions from various sectors of the community. They pointed out that such an artificial language was not feasible, since it lacked both native speakers and a literary tradition to help propagate it.

 

FILIPINO, the national language of the Philippines was finally settled in the 1987 Constitution. Article XIV section 6 states that "the National language of the Philippines is Filipino. As it evolves, it shall be further developed and enriched on the basis of existing Philippine and other languages.

 

The constitution also provided that subject to provision of law and as the congress may deem appropriate, the Government shall take steps to initiate and sustain the use of Filipino as a medium of official communication and as language of instruction in the educational system.

Section 7. For purposes of communication and instruction, the official languages of the Philippines are Filipino and, until otherwise provided by law, English.

 

The regional languages are the auxilliary official language in the region and shall serve as auxilliary media of instruction therein."

It is predicted that by the year 2000, the Philippines will be a Filipino lingua franca speaking nation, which is quite an achievement wrought within a time-frame of around 65 years (1935-2000).

 

http://www.ncca.gov....php?igm=3&i=207

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Stranded Shipscook

 

 

 

You might find that wiki article is slightly misleading ……………..

 

Those words and phrases might be widely used in the everyday usage because they are either have no Pilipino translation or is a foreign derivatives but what wiki did not explain was that most Filipinos’ knows they are not the correct english words/usage but bastardised english (taglish) which most Filipinos are fun of doing. Kind of filipino mentality thing, same as having double names eg. Lenlen, Kiki, Denden, Lotlot, etc…………

 

In the serious articles and the academia that is not acceptable or tolerated!

What's kiki ?

 

post-8399-0-03590500-1317211884_thumb.jpeg

Edited by CATMAN

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Davaoeno

Maybe I'm just slow today but I'm not feeling that edified. You highlite 2 parts- one that sayd the national language is officially called Pilipino, and one that says the national language is Filipino ! Are we to assume that the national language was called Pilipino from 1959 until 1987 when suddenly the official language became known as Filipino ??

 

seems that is the case:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The evolution of the Wikang Pambansa, now known as Filipino, has not remained uneventful, as one finds out from the its historical perspective in the previous section. From 1935 onwards, to the present 1990s we have seen this language develop, first as Tagalog-based that barely ill-disguised itself as the "national language"--a clear victory of Manuel L. Quezon and the espousal of the tagalistas over the Bisayan hopes of Sotto and his Ang Suga advocates-- then, in 1959 acquiring the term "Pilipino"given to it by executive fiat to remove the last vestiges of "tagalogism" and imprint its national character. In 1965, when the "puristas" (purists) attempted to enhance the vocabulary through artificial wordsmithing and thereby intensifying the 'word war" with their critics. Then, beginning in the 1970s which saw Pilipino finally being used as medium of instruction at the primary and secondary levels of public and private schools. And, lastly, from its 1987 constitutional enshrinement as "Filipino" to the present --an amalgamation of Pilipino/Tagalog, Spanish, and a preponderance for English in respelled forms.Maybe i'm just slow today , but

Edited by davaolife

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Headshot

FILIPINO, the national language of the Philippines was finally settled in the 1987 Constitution. Article XIV section 6 states that "the National language of the Philippines is Filipino. As it evolves, it shall be further developed and enriched on the basis of existing Philippine and other languages.

So...if I understand this correctly...since 1987, the national language is FILIPINO. Generally, when a new constitution goes into effect, all previous constitutions and laws are void.

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Athena

What's kiki ?

 

post-8399-0-03590500-1317211884_thumb.jpeg

 

 

:rofl: ...............

 

 

 

Tsk, tsk, tsk …………. Naughty, naughty Catman ……….. :biggrin_01:

 

 

Maybe I'm just slow today but I'm not feeling that edified. You highlite 2 parts- one that sayd the national language is officially called Pilipino, and one that says the national language is Filipino ! Are we to assume that the national language was called Pilipino from 1959 until 1987 when suddenly the official language became known as Filipino ??

 

seems that is the case:

 

 

 

The short answer is YES! You are correct!

 

The long winded answer is that it is officially named Pilipino from 1959 and evolved to Filipino in 1987 to take into account the reality that an integral part of the language used in the everday and intellectual discourse of Filipinos are of foreign derivatives.

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Davaoeno

 

 

The highly educated person here adapts to whatever language they have to use depending on who their intended listener or who the receiver is. As far as going somewhere and observing how people converse to the local of their own place, well you will for sure hear them speak in their own native dialect biggrin.gif I am a visayan but people from Cebu will have a hard time understanding what we are saying. there maybe a few words that is quite the same but really the truth is even is people are Visayan, there are still specific dialect that each applies to each region. Talk to people in Cebu or anywhere inthe visayas using other visayan words and they would sometimes have a hard time picking up what you are saying. However, talk to them in FIlipino and most mabe not all would understand you.

 

I find that surprising ! Where in the visayas are you from ? Did you grow up there- or in Cebu ?

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